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My horse tries to avoid jumps

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        01-31-2014, 02:21 PM
      #11
    Green Broke
    This sounds like a confidence issue, and simply something that he isn't ready for. I would do some more work with cross rails and low verticals at the trot, and ground poles at the walk, trot, and canter.
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        01-31-2014, 02:22 PM
      #12
    Super Moderator
    I would suggest you work at his collected canter before you try jumping him at anything other than a trot - I'm also hoping that you don't mean gallop - but if the horse feels it can't deal with the combination of its speed and taking off over a jump its most likely going to run out rather than risk falling over the pole
    Use lots of grid work - ground poles leading up to a small jump and place angled poles either side of the jump to detract it from running out
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        01-31-2014, 02:27 PM
      #13
    Foal
    Naj,

    While "get a trainer" is great advice, I understand that that can be a long, complicated process, and that even with a trainer, there will still be sessions on your horse without your trainer around.

    So, in the meantime, a few questions:

    1. Have you trained a horse to jump before? How did that go?
    a.)Is this YOUR first attempt at jumping as well? Or have you been trained on proper apprach, two-point, timing, etc....

    2. Is the confirmation of the horse equiped to handle the stress of jumping? Perhaps this horse is just not physically confident, as well as mentally, to be taking on this tast.

    3. How old is this horse?

    4. Are you planning on competing - or just having fun at home? I believe this will also make a huge difference on how you train.
    a.)If you're just planning on having fun at home, then training will probably come from a whole different view point. Ex: No real NEED for flying lead changes, proper headset, perfect knees, etc...However, all of those things would still be an advantage.
         
        01-31-2014, 02:29 PM
      #14
    Yearling
    How old is this horse? Is he maybe not physically able to hold himself at the canter and able to jump the height you are requiring?
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        01-31-2014, 02:34 PM
      #15
    Green Broke
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by speedy da fish    
    It's funny because I also have an Anglo Arab who had this problem, although instead of running out he loved to slam on the breaks and dump me over the jump!
    ROFL!! My Arabian, "Corporal" (19982-2009, RIP) used to love to do that, too, AND embarass me, like when I was leading the family on a VERY LONG trail ride to Harney's Peak--if you've done the ride, you KNOW!--and I dismounted to fix something, let go of him and he started WALKING down the trail, just fast enough for me to have to run after him.
    TOO smart for his own good, and NOT FUNNY!!! =b
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        01-31-2014, 04:50 PM
      #16
    Super Moderator
    About what you can expect from an Arabian. The one I had would jump anything he couldn't go around but if he could get from A to B without jumping he couldn't see the point
    That breed can be way too smart for their own good!!!
         
        02-02-2014, 04:21 PM
      #17
    Naj
    Foal
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by speedy da fish    
    I hope by gallop you mean canter. Please no not gallop into jumps.

    It's funny because I also have an Anglo Arab who had this problem, although instead of running out he loved to slam on the breaks and dump me over the jump!

    Take it nice and slow, if he is okay to pop over a small jump in trot then continue with that until he is feeling confident (and you too!)

    Do some canter pole work so he gains confidence cantering over something and works out his rhythm.

    I find grid work; a grid of about 3 or 4 small jumps is great for nervous horses, it really helped me and my horse with our confidence and rhythm.
    Yeah I mean canter, you have right it's a confidence issue and I guess what you suggested will be very helpful. Thank you
         
        02-02-2014, 04:33 PM
      #18
    Naj
    Foal
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by thatkrayz    
    Naj,

    While "get a trainer" is great advice, I understand that that can be a long, complicated process, and that even with a trainer, there will still be sessions on your horse without your trainer around.

    So, in the meantime, a few questions:

    1. Have you trained a horse to jump before? How did that go?
    a.)Is this YOUR first attempt at jumping as well? Or have you been trained on proper apprach, two-point, timing, etc....

    2. Is the confirmation of the horse equiped to handle the stress of jumping? Perhaps this horse is just not physically confident, as well as mentally, to be taking on this tast.

    3. How old is this horse?

    4. Are you planning on competing - or just having fun at home? I believe this will also make a huge difference on how you train.
    a.)If you're just planning on having fun at home, then training will probably come from a whole different view point. Ex: No real NEED for flying lead changes, proper headset, perfect knees, etc...However, all of those things would still be an advantage.
    Hi, I used to jump on well trained horses, so I guess I have the proper jumping technics. While it is my first time teaching a horse to jump, I guess as you said it's the lack confidence and fear that making him avoiding the jumps. So I will not rush things up in order to make the horse build self confidence.
    PrivatePilot likes this.
         
        02-02-2014, 05:07 PM
      #19
    Green Broke
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Corporal    
    ROFL!! My Arabian, "Corporal" (19982-2009, RIP) used to love to do that, too, AND embarass me, like when I was leading the family on a VERY LONG trail ride to Harney's Peak--if you've done the ride, you KNOW!--and I dismounted to fix something, let go of him and he started WALKING down the trail, just fast enough for me to have to run after him.
    TOO smart for his own good, and NOT FUNNY!!! =b
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by jaydee    
    About what you can expect from an Arabian. The one I had would jump anything he couldn't go around but if he could get from A to B without jumping he couldn't see the point
    That breed can be way too smart for their own good!!!
    They are too smart for their own good! Why do we do it to ourselves?

    Naj, good luck with the jumping, it comes in time! Arabs and Arab crosses really love working and once they have found confidence and trust you they work so hard for you but it is a lot of fun getting there too!
         

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