snaffle?? - The Horse Forum
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post #1 of 14 Old 06-04-2008, 12:44 PM Thread Starter
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snaffle??

this probably should go somewhere else but I wasn't sure so w/e..

What is the difference between a snaffle and a full cheek snaffle?
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post #2 of 14 Old 06-04-2008, 12:52 PM
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Regular Snaffle






Full Cheek Snaffle



The mechanism of the bit is similar to other jointed English snaffles in that the mouthpiece puts pressure on the bars of the mouth, and if jointed the tongue and roof of the mouth. Using the keeper to keep the cheek pieces vertical also acts to exert a slight downward pressure on the crown of the bridle.


Sorry not the greatest help. Lol

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post #3 of 14 Old 06-04-2008, 03:27 PM Thread Starter
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I have a little problem with my twisted d ring snaffle.....when I pull one rein sometimes the bit like goes through her mouth! Ughhh..so I am saying would a full cheek snaffle prevent that?

If my horse doesn't like you then I don't either.Deal with it!
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post #4 of 14 Old 06-04-2008, 03:47 PM
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there are bit guards to prevent that, though usually, depending on the thickness of the guards, you'll have to get a large sized bit
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post #5 of 14 Old 06-04-2008, 05:49 PM
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"snaffle" is the overall name for a bit that has a single joint and acts on the bars of the horse's mouth. "full cheek" describes the sides of it. I think full cheeks help turn a horse easier because it actually turns the nose a bit and you don't have a ring that's going to slide through your horse's mouth. I use a rubber bit guard (a flat round circle of rubber with a hole in the middle) on my loose rings to keep that from happening! With a D ring you shouldn't have that problem (the d should act very similarly to the full cheek) but you could try the bit guards. They're only $2 or 3.
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post #6 of 14 Old 06-04-2008, 08:46 PM Thread Starter
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thanks upnover..that very helful.i think ill try that.i think the bit may be a bit large for her.its like I have to pull her whole head over so that's like the weight of her head im pulling on and so it like slips and inch or 2 through her mouth and its soo frustrating! And I don't even know if it hurts her.im sure its not exactly the most compfortable thing but im going to try those 2 things...its cheaper than a new bit!
Thanks again!

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post #7 of 14 Old 06-04-2008, 08:49 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by upnover
"snaffle" is the overall name for a bit that has a single joint and acts on the bars of the horse's mouth. "full cheek" describes the sides of it. I think full cheeks help turn a horse easier because it actually turns the nose a bit and you don't have a ring that's going to slide through your horse's mouth. I use a rubber bit guard (a flat round circle of rubber with a hole in the middle) on my loose rings to keep that from happening! With a D ring you shouldn't have that problem (the d should act very similarly to the full cheek) but you could try the bit guards. They're only $2 or 3.
Nope. A snaffle can have ANY kind of mouthpiece, not just a single joint. The term just refers to a bit that works off direct pressure I.e. No leverage/no shanks.

A full-cheek is often used for young horses as it reinforces the turning aid. I'm not a fan of bit guards, but we have used a full cheek (also called a fulmer) smaffle on one of our ponies as she had a nasty habit of gaping her mouth open to allow the bit to slip through and avoid the turn. A D-ring SHOULD solve this, as this is what the flat side of the rings is designed for, unless the horse is really gaping its mouth. If that's the case you might want to invest in a full-cheek until you can get that problem sorted.
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post #8 of 14 Old 06-04-2008, 09:05 PM
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It is possible that your bridle is a little two loose....?

I normally like one to even no wrinkles but I've never had my D ring slide through.

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post #9 of 14 Old 06-04-2008, 09:55 PM Thread Starter
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you know what blu..i bet you that's it! I am going to tighten it.put like a hole or 2 in ther.i like my bit to have 2 wrinkles on her cheek,i do belive that's how it is SUPPOSED to fit.but that's just MO

If my horse doesn't like you then I don't either.Deal with it!
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post #10 of 14 Old 06-04-2008, 10:08 PM Thread Starter
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this is the bit I have---bit it has twists like the second pic



If my horse doesn't like you then I don't either.Deal with it!
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