Tips on when to do Two-Point.
 
 

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Tips on when to do Two-Point.

This is a discussion on Tips on when to do Two-Point. within the Jumping forums, part of the English Riding category
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    12-19-2010, 01:25 PM
  #1
Foal
Tips on when to do Two-Point.

When I'm jumping, I have trouble knowing when the horse will take off or 'Feeling the stride'. Any tips on how to sort it out? Because I sometimes get left behind or go forward too early. Thanks!
     
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    12-19-2010, 09:17 PM
  #2
Green Broke
Here's the secret to knowing when your horse will take off. IT DOESN'T MATTER! No, really! When you approach the fence approach it in your medium seat (this is inbetween your full seat and 2 point), and then just sit there. Let your horse jump up to you, do NOT jump for your horse! Your body will naturally go into a 2 point over the fence while you do nothing (your horse jumping up will close your hip angle). Your hips must stay soft for this, getting stiff will not allow you to jump properly.

The problem with thinking you have to put your body into a 2 point over the fence is that 1) you absolutely have to get the timing just right or you will get left behind or go forward to early and particularly 2) you'll try and jump for your horse which leads to ducking and jumping ahead. The problem with this is really that you're affecting your horse's ability to jump.
     
    12-23-2010, 06:33 PM
  #3
Foal
No way, upnover! It's all about balance. About 4 meters away, start going into two point. Make sure you are balanced and at a comfortable stride with your horse. You have to try to be balanced with your horse going over the jump, upnover.
     
    12-30-2010, 11:46 AM
  #4
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by olliexmas    
When I'm jumping, I have trouble knowing when the horse will take off or 'Feeling the stride'.
This might not be exactly what you're asking, but I think if you can find your take-off spot better it will help. That's also important when you jump bigger or on more difficult horses. If you have a trainer, ask them to count down the strides for you. Ie. 3...2...1...jump. Once you sort of get the idea, try counting it outloud yourself. When you approach the jump, say when you think you're three strides out, then two, then one. If the horse takes off right after that last stride, you were correct! Eventually it'll just come to you, and you won't have to say it outloud or really think about it; you just feel it. If you know when you're taking off before you get there it should be easier for you to know when to "jump."
Until you can find your spot, I would suggest you just come into a little two point/half seat about a stride out so you don't get left behind, and just let the horse come up to you. (Yeah, it's easier said than done, unfortunatly) Hope I helped! :)
     
    12-30-2010, 01:11 PM
  #5
Started
Quote:
Originally Posted by monkeyleap    
No way, upnover! It's all about balance. About 4 meters away, start going into two point. Make sure you are balanced and at a comfortable stride with your horse. You have to try to be balanced with your horse going over the jump, upnover.
You're really going to tell upnover that they're wrong?..

You can't exactly just get into 2 point half way across the ring in a show... just saying. Maybe when you first first first start you can use that technique but...
     
    12-30-2010, 09:22 PM
  #6
Weanling
Are you jumping from a trot or canter? If you are jumping from the trot, I would put a trot pole about 7 to 9' in front of the fence, which will help guide you to the fence correctly. At both gaits, work on keeping a steady rhythm to the horses stride coming in, this will help make the timing of the jump more consistent. Either way, what upnover said is correct, and I couldn't have said it much better myself. What I think about is staying still with my upper body, moving my hands forward on the neck, and staying soft in my hips and squatting. If I stay still and soft, the horse will close my hip angle for me at the correct time. No getting left behind or jumping early

What hflmusicislife said is also correct about finding the spot 3 strides out. Right now, you don't need to worry much about it, let your horse get you to the correct location and let the horse make any corrections needed while you are learning. But if you learn to see when you are 3 strides out, you will eventually get to where you can help adjust the horses stride as well.
     
    12-30-2010, 09:53 PM
  #7
Green Broke
Quote:
Originally Posted by upnover    
Here's the secret to knowing when your horse will take off. IT DOESN'T MATTER! No, really! When you approach the fence approach it in your medium seat (this is inbetween your full seat and 2 point), and then just sit there. Let your horse jump up to you, do NOT jump for your horse! Your body will naturally go into a 2 point over the fence while you do nothing (your horse jumping up will close your hip angle). Your hips must stay soft for this, getting stiff will not allow you to jump properly.

The problem with thinking you have to put your body into a 2 point over the fence is that 1) you absolutely have to get the timing just right or you will get left behind or go forward to early and particularly 2) you'll try and jump for your horse which leads to ducking and jumping ahead. The problem with this is really that you're affecting your horse's ability to jump.
Quote:
Originally Posted by hflmusicislife    
This might not be exactly what you're asking, but I think if you can find your take-off spot better it will help. That's also important when you jump bigger or on more difficult horses. If you have a trainer, ask them to count down the strides for you. Ie. 3...2...1...jump. Once you sort of get the idea, try counting it outloud yourself. When you approach the jump, say when you think you're three strides out, then two, then one. If the horse takes off right after that last stride, you were correct! Eventually it'll just come to you, and you won't have to say it outloud or really think about it; you just feel it. If you know when you're taking off before you get there it should be easier for you to know when to "jump."
Until you can find your spot, I would suggest you just come into a little two point/half seat about a stride out so you don't get left behind, and just let the horse come up to you. (Yeah, it's easier said than done, unfortunatly) Hope I helped! :)
Quote:
Originally Posted by sandsarita    
Are you jumping from a trot or canter? If you are jumping from the trot, I would put a trot pole about 7 to 9' in front of the fence, which will help guide you to the fence correctly. At both gaits, work on keeping a steady rhythm to the horses stride coming in, this will help make the timing of the jump more consistent. Either way, what upnover said is correct, and I couldn't have said it much better myself. What I think about is staying still with my upper body, moving my hands forward on the neck, and staying soft in my hips and squatting. If I stay still and soft, the horse will close my hip angle for me at the correct time. No getting left behind or jumping early

What hflmusicislife said is also correct about finding the spot 3 strides out. Right now, you don't need to worry much about it, let your horse get you to the correct location and let the horse make any corrections needed while you are learning. But if you learn to see when you are 3 strides out, you will eventually get to where you can help adjust the horses stride as well.
All three of these posts^^.

You really only have to give a release with the hands because as the horses body comes up, it is going to naturally close the angle of your hip. Your body should stay at pretty much in the position you are in for cantering. Since you are just learning, then you are not needing to be giving a huge release like someone who is going over a 5' fence is.

By counting your strides in, you will also learn to see spots, and learn if you need to push your horse forward, let him be, or collect. You can also help yourself out with this by having a "meter stick canter" meaning that the stride to the canter is always the same. It keeps the same rhythm, with no change. If you are going to count strides...start with a small amount of strides out, and then add so that you can understand where you need to be. If you are getting a bad spot to the same fence multiple times, try a different route. Go two steps further before you turn, or turn sooner. Also count strides between fences if you are doing a line.

Monkeyleap--4 meters out is an awkward spot to go into a 2-point position. Why would you get into it a stride and a half out? If anything, for a new person learning to jump, it would be better to be in a 2-point position as soon as they started trotting/cantering to come to the jump. It gives them less to think about, so they can concentrate on their positioning or hands or a trillion other things.
     
    12-30-2010, 09:57 PM
  #8
Weanling
If I go into two point and im not going gallop or going up a hill my mare drops onto her forehand and therefore refuses (silly sensitive mare haha), so I sit up into the fence and rider her into it. Then as she comes up I just find my body folds forward. The less I think about counting the stride the more likely I am to get it right as I will get too focused on getting the stride and muck it up haha.
     
    12-30-2010, 10:23 PM
  #9
Trained
If you approach the fence in your half seat and allow the horse to close your angles for you, you should remain balanced.

Being fairly new to jumping myself, I found that trying to get into 2 point just made me jump ahead. Instead I just try to remain over the horse and out of his way and let him do the jumping instead of me. I've found that many beginner riders will also 'balance' in two point by using the reins and upnover's method is more effective (even if I'm still perfecting it )
     
    12-30-2010, 10:53 PM
  #10
Yearling
I just wanted to say that I found this thread very informative! I'm still learning to jump myself, and I've found that getting into two-point too early (by trying to "help" myself) actually made me get ahead. One thing that I want to say is really important is making sure your leg is strong! I started learning with a weak-ish leg, and now that my leg is stronger, jumping is much easier! Just focus on the flatwork a LOT! My trainer always emphasizes, if you can't do it on the flat, what makes you think you can do it while jumping?

I also wanted to add a little story!
I was trotting over raised ground poles (so trot poles really...) and my horse (silly boy) decided to jump the 4 trot poles in sets of 2. I wasn't thinking about getting into 2 point, but found that my horse naturally "tossed" my body out of the saddle into the correct-ish (bare in mind this was totally unexpected) position. So I think that not thinking about it really helps!
     

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