training to raise front legs when jumping
   

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training to raise front legs when jumping

This is a discussion on training to raise front legs when jumping within the Jumping forums, part of the English Riding category
  • The horse to pick up front legs when jumping
  • Obstacle jumping for horse

 
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    11-18-2008, 03:10 PM
  #1
Foal
training to raise front legs when jumping

Hi,

I want to train young horses to raise their front legs when they are jumping. Will be training mainly young horses, in a sand arena. Are there any lessons or training tips to get the horses to raise their front legs when jumping?
I read an article that there are training lessons to help a horse raise its front legs, but it never developed what the actual training involves.

All replies would be welcome.

Thanks in advance.
Jimydee.
     
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    11-18-2008, 07:53 PM
  #2
Green Broke
I think it's more of a conditioning thing, rather than actually teaching them to lift thier legs up. They have it in them instictively - they don't want to knock thier legs on poles, it stings. After a while they do seem to be a little more cautious. Just practice and let them do a lot of free jumping to get thier "jumping legs" before you get on them and throw thier balance off...that will help them build up thier nerve too, without depending on you to do all the work for them.
     
    11-18-2008, 08:00 PM
  #3
Foal
Conditioning is very important for sure but don't overtax or overstress your horse's mind or body. Horses do instinctively raise their front legs, but you might want to help your horse get the hang of picking the correct spots and handling different questions by using gymnastic exercises...ground poles first, then small x's and verticals.
Also taking your horse out on hacks where (s)he might encounter a log or small obstacle to step or gently pop over is a way to teach which can make it fun as well.
Good luck!
     
    11-18-2008, 09:10 PM
  #4
Trained
Especially with young horses, be careful about over taxing their joints! Condition them well before even thinking about a jumping training program.
Lines of jumps/gymnastic exercises will pop their knees up. Another way to keep them straighter over fences and get them to think about their jumping is to put 2 poles in a triangle like formation so that the bottom of the two poles is infront of the fence about as wide as it and the top of the poles are resting on the vertical with a 1-2 foot gap between them.
____
/ \
Would be like the aerial view, but with the / \ poles resting on the other one.
     
    11-18-2008, 11:54 PM
  #5
Foal
Gridwork, gymnastic exercises. Some horses are born with more scope than others, so that is something to look for. It takes a while to be effective, so patience is important.

And also, how young are we talking? I would not start a horse jumping under 5. Some breeds mature in their joints slower than others, so you need to look into that as well.
     
    11-23-2008, 04:59 AM
  #6
Foal
Depends on the age and breed of your horse, but generally so that you know, TB's usually have training forelegs because they move naturally with their forefeet low over the ground. Normally a horse that is neglectful of their forelegs tend to compensate by bringing their hocks far too high under the take off, therefore resulting in a scope that is too curved for the obstacle; this shortens the horse's base of supports and results in a really uncomfortable jump/landing for both the horse and rider.

To train your horse to use their forelegs i'd recommend the following:

First: widen your oxers and raise the farther pole 2 or 3 steps higher sloping upwards (to encourage the horse to take a better scope and forces the horse to bring knees into forward position)

Second: use this sequence for obstacles..



It should take about 3-4 months of training.
     
    11-24-2008, 06:53 PM
  #7
Foal
Lots of crossrails with steep sides. This will encourage straightness and get them to be really careful with their feet.

However, if a horse just isn't picking up his feet no matter what, drop the jumping. Some horses are not suited for jumping, and some downright hate it.
     
    12-04-2008, 09:58 PM
  #8
Foal
I have used, BIG cross rails. Like put up all the way to the top hole. Also you could but up a jump then criss cross two poles across it. Meeting at the top.
     
    12-06-2008, 12:14 AM
  #9
Showing
Quote:
Originally Posted by banoota    
Depends on the age and breed of your horse, but generally so that you know, TB's usually have training forelegs because they move naturally with their forefeet low over the ground. Normally a horse that is neglectful of their forelegs tend to compensate by bringing their hocks far too high under the take off, therefore resulting in a scope that is too curved for the obstacle; this shortens the horse's base of supports and results in a really uncomfortable jump/landing for both the horse and rider.

To train your horse to use their forelegs i'd recommend the following:

First: widen your oxers and raise the farther pole 2 or 3 steps higher sloping upwards (to encourage the horse to take a better scope and forces the horse to bring knees into forward position)

Second: use this sequence for obstacles..



It should take about 3-4 months of training.
man! You're artsy look at that work!
     
    12-07-2008, 10:55 AM
  #10
Foal
Gymnastics, gymnastics, gymnastics...lol

I have found that doing alot of "pops" helps...also, you can try building an upright and put two poles in a v-shape, this also helps them learn to jump the centre of the jump.
     

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