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This is why

This is a discussion on This is why within the Jumping forums, part of the English Riding category

     
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        06-19-2010, 11:04 PM
      #21
    Yearling
    Hopefully the inexperienced rider is riding an older, well trained horse that's gone through hell and back when it comes to jumping. Generally school masters have been around enough courses and keep a steady pace, so they actually figure out their own distances regardless of the rider. I've been on a few truckers like that and it's great. Granted, I'm not exactly inexperienced, but it's a nice feeling not to have to do much other than steer!

    Green horse + green rider = black and blue with the horse gone, generally.
         
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        06-19-2010, 11:39 PM
      #22
    Trained
    Strange summed it up well.

    Quote:
    So how do they know WHEN to jump with inexperienced rider?
    When horses are about 10 strides from the fence, they see it as 2 in their line of sight. Then when they get about 5 strides away, the fence merges into 1, then when they get even closer, it has completely dissapeared from their vision.

    They already locked it in when they were 10 strides away.

    There are 2 types of horses.

    1) The horse who will do his job regardless of his riders education.

    This horse has its positives and its negatives. Yes, this horse will get his rider over the fence regardless and will help his rider grow, mature, build confidence and make things enjoyable - while at the same time, wont teach the rider to be solid and functional.

    2) The horse who requires his rider to be supportive and solid through their form to get them to the fence.

    This is a horse only meant for a rider who has established the fundamentals and has become more confident in their riding, so that if the horse does stop due to rider error, the rider will beable to say "ok, what did I do wrong, what do I need to do to correct this" so that they become that much better the next time around.

    This is a horse that will make an unconfident rider, more unconfident - so a horse that does not belong under a rider who isn't at that level where they can learn and grow from, where they wont be scared to progress forward.

    Both have their place. Both teach, both educate, while at the same time they both can hinder and both can hold back a rider.

    They each have their place, with the right rider on their backs.
         
        06-20-2010, 12:35 AM
      #23
    Yearling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by MIEventer    
    Strange summed it up well.



    When horses are about 10 strides from the fence, they see it as 2 in their line of sight. Then when they get about 5 strides away, the fence merges into 1, then when they get even closer, it has completely dissapeared from their vision.

    They already locked it in when they were 10 strides away.

    There are 2 types of horses.

    1) The horse who will do his job regardless of his riders education.

    This horse has its positives and its negatives. Yes, this horse will get his rider over the fence regardless and will help his rider grow, mature, build confidence and make things enjoyable - while at the same time, wont teach the rider to be solid and functional.

    2) The horse who requires his rider to be supportive and solid through their form to get them to the fence.

    This is a horse only meant for a rider who has established the fundamentals and has become more confident in their riding, so that if the horse does stop due to rider error, the rider will beable to say "ok, what did I do wrong, what do I need to do to correct this" so that they become that much better the next time around.

    This is a horse that will make an unconfident rider, more unconfident - so a horse that does not belong under a rider who isn't at that level where they can learn and grow from, where they wont be scared to progress forward.

    Both have their place. Both teach, both educate, while at the same time they both can hinder and both can hold back a rider.

    They each have their place, with the right rider on their backs.
    Agreed. They definitely each have their place.

    This is where the trainer comes in and it's up to their discretion as to when the rider is solid enough to move on to a horse that's going to need them more than an old schoolmaster. At the same time though, the switch to a greener horse needs to be gradual. For example, they wouldn't be shoved onto a 5 year old right away. They'd probably move to a horse that's fairly consistent, but looks at a certain kind of jump, like barrels. It'll keep the rider confident, but teach them how to ride when a horse is a little iffy at some jumps, etc.
         
        06-21-2010, 08:32 AM
      #24
    Showing
    Thanks, ladies! One more question then. So when the horse does't jump, but "merge" to the side and go around the fence (I've seen that happened even with VERY good riders), why does that happen if the horse can't see the fence anyway and relies on rider or own memory?
         
        06-23-2010, 07:31 PM
      #25
    Trained
    Because the rider permitted it through their form - whether it was their seat, their, legs, calves, upper body, shoulders, hands, head, eyes - whichever.....without knowing it. So the horse had the opening and took it.

    99% of errors that occur when jumping, are rider - not horse.

    When I cliniced with Ian Milar eons ago, in a galaxy far far away - I learnt from him *and I'll remember this to the day I die* was: "A good rider blames themselves, where a poor rider blames their horse"

    So, there was something that the rider did, somewhere between 5 strides to 1 - which creates the results that occured.
         

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