Zig zagging towards Jumps.
   

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Zig zagging towards Jumps.

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    09-06-2009, 02:53 PM
  #1
Foal
Zig zagging towards Jumps.

Okay So i've started Romeo on jumping. :]
He does really good! Except that its hard to make him go straight towards a jump. He zig zags towards it and leg only makes him go towards a canter, when I prefure him to trot in canter out. And I know it can be dangerous for him to jump at an angle so I don't want him to.

What can I do to make him learn to head straight and more towards the middle of the jump? Also what can I do to make him learn his striding and lift his legs more? He's new to jumping but is doing fairly well. He wants to canter towards them all the time but if I let him he'll knock the pole down cause he dosent know his strides yet.

Also, Romeo has a bit of a hay belly 'cause he wasnt ridden much.
What excersizes can I do to work that belly off and make him.. slimer!

Thanks. :]
     
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    09-06-2009, 02:59 PM
  #2
Started
For the zig zagging, legg into hand. Hold the reins evenly to keep him at a trot, and hold with both legs to hold him straight. And look UP! Pick a spot above and beyond the jump and ride to that spot. Don't think about the jump, think about riding straight to that point. By keeping your head up and straight, your body will stay straight and you won't accidently cue him to shift with your seat
     
    09-06-2009, 03:53 PM
  #3
Trained
You say your leg only makes him speed up into a canter. Does he understand lateral aids? If you put your left leg on him at any gait, does he know to move off it? Both legs play a large part in keeping your horse straight to the jump. If he doesn't know how to move off your leg, it would greatly benefit you to teach him some basics.
     
    09-07-2009, 10:28 PM
  #4
Green Broke
I'm going to take a guess that your horse's flatwork needs a little work. Before I really start a horse's jumping training they need to be able to have 3 solid gaits and know how to move off my leg. So a leg cue to them doesn't just mean "go faster" it can also mean "move over". (leg yields particularly but also turn on the forehand, shoulder/haunches in, etc) That way, when a horse starts to drift or try to avoid the fence I can fix it. You need to be able to make a "chute" for your horse using both reins and both legs so they have no option to go forward. But unless your horse can move away from your leg there isn't much you can do. I'm also going to guess that he is knocking down poles, not just because he can't find a distance (at the beginning of his training this is your job, not his) but also because he doesn't know what to do with his body. I suggest lots and lots of gymnastics! It's the best way to teach a horse what to do with his body while he jumps and eventually find his own distances.
     
    09-07-2009, 11:39 PM
  #5
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by upnover    
I'm going to take a guess that your horse's flatwork needs a little work. Before I really start a horse's jumping training they need to be able to have 3 solid gaits and know how to move off my leg. So a leg cue to them doesn't just mean "go faster" it can also mean "move over". (leg yields particularly but also turn on the forehand, shoulder/haunches in, etc) That way, when a horse starts to drift or try to avoid the fence I can fix it. You need to be able to make a "chute" for your horse using both reins and both legs so they have no option to go forward. But unless your horse can move away from your leg there isn't much you can do. I'm also going to guess that he is knocking down poles, not just because he can't find a distance (at the beginning of his training this is your job, not his) but also because he doesn't know what to do with his body. I suggest lots and lots of gymnastics! It's the best way to teach a horse what to do with his body while he jumps and eventually find his own distances.
Yes and No. O.o

He does move off my leg if he starts to move a way where I don't want him to go. Usually quite well. He'll sometimes drift but I think the reins might be an issue. He prefures long rein, I think its cause he used to be western and he's used to it he starts tossing his head and being an ass if its too short. Um for the poles? He used to. Now he's getting better, I've started him on bounces, and he did well, he over jumped them a bit at first but I unno. I raised it once and THEN he started to knock them down alot. It went to small verticle to bigger crossrail. Then I raised the verticle by one hole and he knocked it down.

Is there something I can do for reins? Or other exersizes?
     
    09-08-2009, 10:54 AM
  #6
Foal
If you just want to work on his jumping - lay yourself some ground poles on either side of the jump. Also working him through some small crossrail gymnastics may help you out a good bit. 2 stride, 1 stride, bounce. Keep jumps low so he does not get frustrated and run out on you. :) As far as flat work goes - working him at the sitting trot across your diagonals and figure eights may help you out as well
     
    09-08-2009, 02:15 PM
  #7
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by Canopach01    
If you just want to work on his jumping - lay yourself some ground poles on either side of the jump. Also working him through some small crossrail gymnastics may help you out a good bit. 2 stride, 1 stride, bounce. Keep jumps low so he does not get frustrated and run out on you. :) As far as flat work goes - working him at the sitting trot across your diagonals and figure eights may help you out as well
Ooh.. Hm.. Those are good idea thanks!
     
    09-08-2009, 08:46 PM
  #8
Foal
The fact that he's zigzagging isn't entirely his fault. Make sure you alway look at the jump as you aproach it... don't get me wrong, you shouldn't look down, but as you near the corner to turn into the jump, turn your head in the direction of the jump. A lot of weight is in your head, and this will help direct your horse. Try setting up a tiny x. This will encourage him to jump in the middle, which is the smallest part.
     
    09-10-2009, 01:12 AM
  #9
Green Broke
Quote:
Originally Posted by Unwoven    
Yes and No. O.o
He does move off my leg if he starts to move a way where I don't want him to go. Usually quite well. He'll sometimes drift but I think the reins might be an issue.
I'm not entirely certain what you mean... but it doesn't sound like he has enough understanding to know what your leg cues are. Can he leg yield? You mentioned when you put your leg on he just starts cantering. He needs to know the difference between a canter cue and a leg yield cue. What I mean by knowing how to move off your leg is that if he starts to drift left? I would close my left leg and he should straighten. He drifts right? And I close my right leg and he straightens. So he is not "allowed" to drift because my leg will stop him and straighten him before he really gets a chance to drift.

About the reins... what kind of bit are you using? I've trained many many western horses to jump and I don't have any head tossers. But then again I don't think I've trained any really upper level western horses that only go on a really loopy rein. Anyways, first thing I do is put a snaffle in their mouth and then teach them to accept contact/submit to pressure. If he's tossing his head he's either not accepting the bit OR he has some teeth issues that are hurting him. Make sure the bit or his teeth aren't the problem first.

The hardest thing for a horse to learn about jumping is where to put his legs. They don't automatically know what to do with their body. My opinion is htat it's best to start off small and KEEP it small, for a while. Let him learn how to jump and where to put his legs and what to do with his body and then raise the fences. If he's unsure over the small stuff he'll either start rushing the bigger stuff or knocking them down (or usually both). That's why gymnastics are so great! Teaches them how to use their body!

And as someone else mentioned, make sure you are giving him the correct cues with your body. Eyes up and forward, etc.
     

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