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~ Leg Position? Confused!

This is a discussion on ~ Leg Position? Confused! within the Jumping forums, part of the English Riding category
  • Proper leg position horse over fences
  • George morris leg position

 
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    11-15-2009, 05:57 PM
  #51
Trained
Equitation is VERY important - regardless if you are doing a small x rail or a 4'0" fence - and you should be concerned with where your lower leg is, your seat is, your core is, your shoulders are and your hands etc, etc, etc.

You legs, should be stuck at that girth 100% of the time over fences. On approach, over, landing, depart.

You are not only aiding your form and solidity in your tack, but you are also aiding your horse and are remaining supportive as you should be.

You are NEVER ontop of your horse. You area ALWAYS around your horse. This is a team effort, if you don't do your job properly, how do you expect your horse to do his/hers? If you are out, how do you expect your horse not to be?
     
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    11-24-2009, 12:09 PM
  #52
Weanling
There was a really great article in Practical Horseman several months back about leg position, the gist of which was that your legs should always be at a 90 Degrees angle to the ground, no matter where you and your horse are in relation to the ground. It had some great pics, culled from eventing, jumping and steeple chase. I think it might have been by Dutten?

Anyway, it was really good at explaining how your leg should look and why it should be that way. Basically, whether your horse is flat, taking off, in the air or landing, your leg should form a 90 degree angle to the ground...no matter what discipline you practice. This give you the most secure position over fences and the most control.

Although Jumpers may not be judged on leg position, having that control is what will allow you to make the tight turns and have the controlled speed needed to make time. So any assertion that it is appropriate for Jumper riders to have their legs flying off behind them is incorrect, although they'll be more likely to be punished by their overall performance than by judges.

And of course, bad leg position can happen even to those of us who know better - gives us something to work on!
     
    11-24-2009, 05:13 PM
  #53
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by PoohLP    
There was a really great article in Practical Horseman several months back about leg position, the gist of which was that your legs should always be at a 90 Degrees angle to the ground, no matter where you and your horse are in relation to the ground. It had some great pics, culled from eventing, jumping and steeple chase. I think it might have been by Dutten?

Anyway, it was really good at explaining how your leg should look and why it should be that way. Basically, whether your horse is flat, taking off, in the air or landing, your leg should form a 90 degree angle to the ground...no matter what discipline you practice. This give you the most secure position over fences and the most control.

Although Jumpers may not be judged on leg position, having that control is what will allow you to make the tight turns and have the controlled speed needed to make time. So any assertion that it is appropriate for Jumper riders to have their legs flying off behind them is incorrect, although they'll be more likely to be punished by their overall performance than by judges.

And of course, bad leg position can happen even to those of us who know better - gives us something to work on!
It was by Jim Wofford! I read that article at least ten times . I agree- if you don't have a secure position, you can't expect your horse (unless they are basically push-button, but even then) to do their job properly if you don't do YOURS. Although George Morris says that even the best riders will compromise their position over a 5', 5'6", etc. fence. Not saying it's ideal, but it's pretty much reality.
     
    11-24-2009, 05:36 PM
  #54
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by anrz    
It was by Jim Wofford! I read that article at least ten times . I agree- if you don't have a secure position, you can't expect your horse (unless they are basically push-button, but even then) to do their job properly if you don't do YOURS. Although George Morris says that even the best riders will compromise their position over a 5', 5'6", etc. fence. Not saying it's ideal, but it's pretty much reality.

I know this is a little off topic but I love Jim Wofford, I had a clinic with him about 5yrs ago and he is awesome and totally drives into your head about where ur legs should be. He freaked out on this one girl bc she couldnt keep her leg from slipping but she thought her and her horse what the bees knees if you know what I mean
     
    11-24-2009, 06:41 PM
  #55
Green Broke
I know my leg needs alot more work, that's my winter project, I think being aware that you need that kind of work on your position is better than saying "it isn't that important" I disagree with the statement of 90 degrees, becuase when your horse is taking off or landing, their body is in a different position and your leg would have to be either to forward or to back to keep it at 90 degrees. I think saying to keep it parrell to the girth would be a little safer, wow I'm using Geometry in my real life! Who woulda thunk it?
     
    11-24-2009, 08:26 PM
  #56
Trained
Jim Wofford rocks. I haven't ready anything by him yet that I disagree with. It's good common sense riding. He's dead on. When you jump, your lower leg should always be perpendicular to the ground and your upper body should stay in the same relative position as well. The only moving human parts when you jump should be your arms for the release and your hips and knees to absorb the motion of the horse jumping up to you. You torso is not supposed to move in the whole grand scheme of things. Folding at the hip is what gets your butt out of the saddle to accomodate the jump. Apparently to a lot of riders, that looks like an upper body movement rather than coming from the hips. I can show it way better than I can say it, so I'll try to make an animation if I get some time to better illustrate it.
     
    11-24-2009, 10:45 PM
  #57
Weanling
I went back and found the article. It was Wofford's May 2009 Cross Country Clinic article, titled "Why Vertical is ABSOLUTE. I was wrong about the 90 degree angle, what he says is that your stirrup leather should be vertical to the ground. On the flat, this translates to a 90 degree angle. As you're jumping, the actual angle of your leg changes, but your stirrup should always be vertical to the ground. He says he likes to think of it as vertical rather than perpendicular, because perpendicular is relative, but vertical is absolute.

Here's the short, online version of the article:
Why a Vertical Stirrup Leather is Critical on Cross-Country
     
    11-24-2009, 11:12 PM
  #58
Trained
Quote:
Sorry for a triple post, but this just can't be possible. I'm sorry, but how do you expect anyone to be able to show when that's the only time they ride? How could you possibly know they aren't riding at home?
Different discipline, btu I know a polocrosse rider who has about 4 horses in work with a trainer constantly while she lives somewhere else - gets on for the ganme and hands them back. Does happen :]
     
    11-25-2009, 03:54 PM
  #59
Green Broke
I get what you're saying now Pooh
     

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