broadening my horse sense
 
 

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broadening my horse sense

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        02-05-2012, 08:40 AM
      #1
    Weanling
    broadening my horse sense

    Good Morning everybody!
    I am so glad I found this forum!
    My girlfriend is a very talented rider and trainer, having been around horses and livestock all her life, and truth be told, I am very much amazed as to what she can do with her horses!
    I've been interested in horses for decades, but due to professional commitments and other life priorities, I have had very little opportunity to pursue knowledge and experience in riding and care of horses.
    She has 2 babies, both thoroughbreds, that are very amazing creatures. The problem lies in that the most rideable one has degenerative foot conditions, and the other is too green for me to ride.
    Thankfully, her best friend has a wonderful paint that is both large enough and forgiving enough for me to begin gaining experience in both riding and proper care for her.
    I am very thankful to be surrounded by so many wonderful and knowledgeable folks, but it never hurts to surround yourself with more, right?
    So, I will thank you all in advance for humoring me when I ask the seemingly ridiculous questions on things that have been asked a thousand times before, and appreciate all the knowledge and experience that you share, to assist me in becoming a better rider and helping me best serve my future horse buddies.
    It would very much break my heart to know I had harmed my horse through lack of knowledge, experience, or other neglect on my part.
    That's where this forum comes into play for me.
    So, again, thank you in advance for your help, wisdom, and guidance!
         
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        02-05-2012, 08:48 AM
      #2
    Banned
    Good morning :) and welcome to the forum!
    Its so very nice to here from people like you, wanting to learn as much as you can is the first step to becoming a GREAT horseman.

    I have to ask though, by "babies" how old do you mean?
         
        02-05-2012, 09:47 AM
      #3
    Weanling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by sierrams1123    
    Good morning :) and welcome to the forum!
    Its so very nice to here from people like you, wanting to learn as much as you can is the first step to becoming a GREAT horseman.

    I have to ask though, by "babies" how old do you mean?
    Ha! Her babies are Sammie, 3, and Charity, 11. Charity has the degenerative foot issue, and Sammie is a still growing warhorse....absolutely gorgeous, but wider than my flatbed duallie truck.....
    We're sitting on the sofa, discussing horses, their behaviors, and character compositions, while enjoying our morning coffee.
    The stories she tells me, and the differences between what seems to be common sense to me, and the actual actions taken by others, are mind boggling to me.
    She takes the psychology of training based on Jack Brainard, with a few of her own experience based tricks mixed in.
    Having seen the results firsthand, the adoration her horses have for her, and the awesome respect that she has for them and theyb have for her, i'd say it's working well.
    Her abilities with horses are very similar to my abilities with dogs.
    And that, to me, is a glorious thing.
         
        02-05-2012, 11:42 AM
      #4
    Banned
    Okay. You could have thrown off some folks on here with the "babies" comment....could have come off as you were really trying to ride baby horse.....not a way to make friends on this forum.
         
        02-05-2012, 12:13 PM
      #5
    Weanling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by sierrams1123    
    Okay. You could have thrown off some folks on here with the "babies" comment....could have come off as you were really trying to ride baby horse.....not a way to make friends on this forum.
    Thats true....and I understand your point.
    Well taken I might add.
    No, the horses are far from being babies in the sense of age and size, but still loved as though they are our children.
    Which somewhat correlates to a couple threads I have seen which, disturbingly so to me, seem to demonstrate pure cruelty to the animals.
    A horse whose tongue is so tore up to have lacerations, and it's called training?
    A "trainer" beating the snot out of a horse?
    Yeah, I don't think so.
    My honey has helped me augment my general respect for horses, clarified some of the do's and don'ts, and tells me about the things she sees at work as examples of what to do and what not to do.
    By her, I have a reasonably wise horse sense (her words) of common sense for the horse.
    If that makes sense at all.

    She advocates the training mentality of "if the horse isnt doing what I want it to do, I have to alter how I ask".
    One point that sticks out for me from Jack Brainards book is, "the horse is almost never wrong. If you don't get the results you want, you best change your communication methods" or something to that effect.
    Makes sense to me.
    From what I have experienced so far, horses communicate through expression and action.
    Being able to understand what theyre saying comes from experience.
    Thank you for pointing out my comments that could be misconstrued.
    I will be more wise on my phrasing of things in the future.
    Have a great day!
         
        02-05-2012, 10:10 PM
      #6
    Green Broke
    Welcome to the forum!! So overall, are you planning on eventually getting a horse for yourself?
         
        02-05-2012, 10:35 PM
      #7
    Weanling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by csimkunas6    
    Welcome to the forum!! So overall, are you planning on eventually getting a horse for yourself?
    Most certainly! As it turns out, the folks that are boarding my girl's horses have two others theyre boarding for an absentee owner, who has gotten behind on the board and feed bills pretty bad.
    Of the two, one is about 30, the other is about 15 (best guess by all parties present today).
    The old one is definitely unrideable, due to a multitude of issues.
    The other is lamed up pretty bad, but my girl thinks a shoeing, and some enhanced nutrition, would remedy the situation enough to make him rideable on the trails.
    He seems to have a real good disposition, quite friendly, and likes a good scratch behind the ears. Everyone there today thought he would make a great horse for me, knowing my abilities and desired focus for my horse.
    He stood well for her when she looked at his feet, and didnt fuss when she cleaned out his hooves. There was a bit of funk in his hooves (she mentioned it by a name, but i'm not remembering it), that smelled like fermented dog poo in july, which she said should be easily remedied with a good shoeing and a little extra attention to his feet.
    So, time will tell, and we'll see if the owner comes around and decides to help the horse have a good quality home and life instead of the miserable existence he has going on.
    It was quite torturous for me to watch that poor horse hobble around on his sore feet.
    I SO wanted to call my farrier buddy to come do his feet to give him some relief and help him be happy again. But, due to the legal aspects, I was advised to do nothing.
    Oh, and even through all that, ya know the best part?
    He's a gorgeous PAINT!
         
        02-05-2012, 10:38 PM
      #8
    Green Broke
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by azwantapaint    
    Most certainly! As it turns out, the folks that are boarding my girl's horses have two others theyre boarding for an absentee owner, who has gotten behind on the board and feed bills pretty bad.
    Of the two, one is about 30, the other is about 15 (best guess by all parties present today).
    The old one is definitely unrideable, due to a multitude of issues.
    The other is lamed up pretty bad, but my girl thinks a shoeing, and some enhanced nutrition, would remedy the situation enough to make him rideable on the trails.
    He seems to have a real good disposition, quite friendly, and likes a good scratch behind the ears. Everyone there today thought he would make a great horse for me, knowing my abilities and desired focus for my horse.
    He stood well for her when she looked at his feet, and didnt fuss when she cleaned out his hooves. There was a bit of funk in his hooves (she mentioned it by a name, but i'm not remembering it), that smelled like fermented dog poo in july, which she said should be easily remedied with a good shoeing and a little extra attention to his feet.
    So, time will tell, and we'll see if the owner comes around and decides to help the horse have a good quality home and life instead of the miserable existence he has going on.
    It was quite torturous for me to watch that poor horse hobble around on his sore feet.
    I SO wanted to call my farrier buddy to come do his feet to give him some relief and help him be happy again. But, due to the legal aspects, I was advised to do nothing.
    Oh, and even through all that, ya know the best part?
    He's a gorgeous PAINT!

    Sounds like thrush....it can be treated and prevented, which is always good.

    Its so awesome that you are doing your research before, sounds like you have basic knowledge of horses too....beyond jealous though, my husband has no desire to get a horse.

    As for the Paint part, that's awesome! Nothing like a little Paint to brighten your day
         
        02-05-2012, 10:54 PM
      #9
    Weanling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by csimkunas6    
    Sounds like thrush....it can be treated and prevented, which is always good.

    Its so awesome that you are doing your research before, sounds like you have basic knowledge of horses too....beyond jealous though, my husband has no desire to get a horse.

    As for the Paint part, that's awesome! Nothing like a little Paint to brighten your day
    Thats what she called it! Thrush! Stinky stuff too....ugh.
    Im fortunate to have a little basic knowledge, having grown up on a dairy farm of a sort.
    Im also very fortunate to have so many wonderful people around me who do know horses, and are so supportive of my endeavor!
    As long as I can take him on a good, long ride in the back country, hopefully bowhunting too, and he does his part in helping grow carrots (he'd be in charge of manure production- I think he's the best man for the job), we'll be good.
    Now, it just remains to be seen whether the owner rectifies their rectal-cranial inversion and comes to realize the situation theyre putting that poor horse through, the torture it endures with needing a shoeing in a bad way, only time will tell.
         
        02-05-2012, 11:43 PM
      #10
    Trained
    Welcome to the forum
    Nice to meet you
    Have fun
         

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