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        12-29-2011, 07:28 PM
      #21
    Foal
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by CherylB    
    He's a pretty boy! I hope Cash and you are a good fit. I hope he gets accustomed to being ridden and handled again. It must be a challenge after a year of "neglect." (Not sure if he was neglected or not.)

    I had my first barn duty (on the job training to the max) and it rained the entire 3 hours. What a way to get my feet wet! ;) I'll never forget my first day there. I hope it's a rare event to be outside and working with the horses (and goats) on a really rainy day like today. I only signed up for two days a week so we'll see how the weather gods treat me. So far, the worst weather in the forecast are on my two days! LMAO
    Hes home now :) He wasn't neglected, just not ridden for a year. Tomorrow is his first real day of work. Hopefully in a few short weeks we can start trail riding.

    Hope the weather picks up for you, its starting to get very cold, very quick.
         
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        12-30-2011, 12:38 AM
      #22
    Foal
    I have a newbie question. If a horse acts unruly at feeding time and acts aggressive when taken back into its stall in the evening, how should that be dealt with? I saw the woman who is a regular there wait until the horse had a split second of ears forward before she poured his grain into the bucket. I have less experience with horses than with dogs but I know a dog would need a little more "calm submissive behavior" before being rewarded.

    If this horse has a problem with people being in her stall, should she be given her grain and then taken out of her stall to be cross-tied for grooming and then put back in her stall for her dinnertime hay? I want to work on this behavior flaw and respect her space issues, while finding a way to get her to move past these quirks.

    What do y'all think? Her pattern is to be taken from the corral, let loose of her harness and immediately be able to begin eating her evening hay. Then the grain is brought in and that's when she starts acting nasty. Her ears go back, she backs into the stall and tolerates the little grooming that is expected. Then her grain is poured into her bucket at the second she acts appropriately.

    Shouldn't she be made to act appropriately for more than a split second? Should I put her into the cross-ties for grooming right after she eats her evening grain (which doesn't take long) and then bring her back into her stall for the hay? Seems to me that would be respecting her space while still maintaining the upper hand.
         
        12-30-2011, 06:35 PM
      #23
    Foal
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by CherylB    
    I have a newbie question. If a horse acts unruly at feeding time and acts aggressive when taken back into its stall in the evening, how should that be dealt with? I saw the woman who is a regular there wait until the horse had a split second of ears forward before she poured his grain into the bucket. I have less experience with horses than with dogs but I know a dog would need a little more "calm submissive behavior" before being rewarded.

    If this horse has a problem with people being in her stall, should she be given her grain and then taken out of her stall to be cross-tied for grooming and then put back in her stall for her dinnertime hay? I want to work on this behavior flaw and respect her space issues, while finding a way to get her to move past these quirks.

    What do y'all think? Her pattern is to be taken from the corral, let loose of her harness and immediately be able to begin eating her evening hay. Then the grain is brought in and that's when she starts acting nasty. Her ears go back, she backs into the stall and tolerates the little grooming that is expected. Then her grain is poured into her bucket at the second she acts appropriately.

    Shouldn't she be made to act appropriately for more than a split second? Should I put her into the cross-ties for grooming right after she eats her evening grain (which doesn't take long) and then bring her back into her stall for the hay? Seems to me that would be respecting her space while still maintaining the upper hand.
    Does she act up on a lead? Try giving her the hay first, and then bringing the grain in. Or you could tie her in the stall when you grain her.
         
        01-01-2012, 12:36 PM
      #24
    Foal
    Well, on Tuesday when I was being taught how to grain her, the horse was acting threatening and doesn't like people in her stall. So she (the girl) waited until that split second when her ears went forward to pour the grain in her bucket. I know more about dogs than I do about horses and a split second wouldn't do with a dog. They need to be "calm submissive" and in the right state of mind to do things with them.

    Anyway, on Friday I chose to grain this horse to see if I could manage to get a longer period in which to feed her and she was much better with me. It might have been a fluke but I didn't have any problem. And the girl on Friday did groom her outside of her stall, on cross-ties. I thought that was a smart thing to do. If she doesn't like people in her stall and her space when she's in there, then we might as well respect that and do what we can to work around her idiosyncrasies. There are times when we need to go in there with her, but we can still be considerate of her and limit those times.

    Lord knows we all have some!
         

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