Canada Bound - of family, dogs and horses - Page 14 - The Horse Forum

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post #131 of 306 Old 10-18-2012, 07:21 PM
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Originally Posted by Shropshirerosie View Post
The locals keep themselves amused trying to scare me with tales of the winters here . Yes, I've got a Dodge Ram; a truck is my favourite vehicle by far - 4wd, towing, moving hay bales, the uses are endless.
Whining about the weather (and the innacuracy of weather forecasters) is the national past time here. Winter really is bearable with the right clothing. It can get quite cold, but it is a dry cold.

Driving on the other hand is a little more frightening when the roads are bad, especially when that first snowfall hits (forcasted for this weekend by the way). Cold or not, a light skiff of snow over a nice layer of ice will turn your vehicle into a curling rock faster than you can say "watch out!". You should be good with the Dodge since it is 4WD. You also have the advantage that it is a larger, heavier vehicle than most, which means you are more likely to come out on top in the game if inertia.
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post #132 of 306 Old 10-19-2012, 03:47 PM Thread Starter
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My Arm doesn't need to be Amputated

Yesterday I had my x-ray and surgeon update. Yah! The bash my arm got from my seven year old son didn't knock it out as I had secretly feared. When I say secretly, I mean of course that I admitted it to everyone but my husband

This is what I learnt from the Surgeon:

1 the ego of the surgeon knows no bounds, and the ability of all the medical staff to laugh at his jokes remains unfettered.

2 my English accent, which unintentionally gets more clipped the more he tries to patronise me, brings out the best (worst?) in the surgeon as he seems to think me a fine audience for his jokes.

3 my sling is now there only to protect my arm from crowds, horses, and small boys. When not around those, I can take it off and should use my arm as much as possible in order to get some movement back into the tendons and ligaments and such like.

4 apparently the fracture I sustained is extremely uncommon in healthy young people and that fact that I managed it is either indicative that I have weak bones (highly unlikely) or that the force with which I hit the ground centred on just one small part of arm was extraordinarily strong, and unlucky.

5 my husband and I can call his dislocated shoulder and my proximal humerus fracture a dead tie as far as pain and inconvenience goes. But I still think I win because I fainted (which of course husband doesn't know) twice, AND I had to have surgery.

6 the bones aren't healed or joined yet, but the plate he put in is holding it all together so I don't need to worry about injuring it in the course of the day.

So hip hip hurray I have of course immediately embarked on a get-this-arm-mobile again programme. Which of course I overdo and get a bit tired by the evening...!

My upper arm can come away from my body by about 3 inches to the front, side and back (which makes putting a t-shirt on difficult, and taking it off impossible). The elbow has full movement now, but is incredibly weak. I have a bingo wing! On my right arm because my toned muscles are now feeble and flabby I can't rotate the arm in the shoulder at all.

Over the next four weeks I keep going on my own, then another check-up and x-ray, than hopefully physio to help get it moving.

Get up, get going, seize the day. Enjoy the sunshine, the rain, cloudy days, snowstorms, and thunder. Getting on your horse is always worth the effort.
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post #133 of 306 Old 10-19-2012, 04:00 PM Thread Starter
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An English Girl tries out Round Penning

In the course of being unable to ride, I have perused threads here to find out all the names of trainers good, bad, and ugly that do on-line training stuff as I am pretty much a novice when it comes to "groundwork" (that being a swear word in many an English yard).

So today, I went out to the round pen armed with a head collar and lead rope, and long lunging whip. My aim was to do a little work with Ukon to see if I could get him moving (as I see in videos), get his attention, and get his respect. First off I catch Ukon and head collar him using the patented one-armed trick as discussed on another thread, then go to take him into the Round pen. But oh! Riley sees grass which he hasn't investigated and he goes in first. Doh.

Put Ukon back in field, and go in to see what I can achieve with Riley. He's definitely more used to being free schooled than lunged and I was quite pleased with what I achieved - he's lazy, clever, thinks he's boss, but is willing to concede to me if I demonstrate my worth. Not an ounce of malice in him. A good education for me. Then I take him out, and fetch Ukon again.... One armed gate opening too slow and Riley slips in again! Cue another Riley session. With him I have to use the lunging whip ready to make contact with his bottom to prove that I really do mean business.

Then back to fetch Ukon again, and this time be cleverer with gate, and with telling Riley to move away before I open it. Ukon is the opposite of Riley and I could drop the lunge whip and just use the lead rope coiled up in my hand. He is young and showed it, doing some quite unnecessary speed but I was really pleased that I did manage to work with him and engage his brain. He was blowing like a train at the end of our short session - fat and unfit.

So - my first experience of "Round Penning", that ancient art so loved by many. Interesting, enlightening, and I will enjoy doing more.
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Get up, get going, seize the day. Enjoy the sunshine, the rain, cloudy days, snowstorms, and thunder. Getting on your horse is always worth the effort.
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post #134 of 306 Old 10-19-2012, 04:09 PM
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Sounds like a good progress. So you'll be out riding tomorrow then!!!!!!
I too had to try out the whole round penning thing - just to prove I could do it and so could the horse. We also did the tarp challenge.
Our West Midlands accents frequently get mistaken for Australian or Irish ???????? At least no one here says how awful they are
Have you got any options for winter riding there - indoor schools for eg
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post #135 of 306 Old 10-20-2012, 02:04 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Shropshirerosie View Post
...

So today, I went out to the round pen armed with a head collar and lead rope, and long lunging whip. My aim was to do a little work with Ukon to see if I could get him moving (as I see in videos), get his attention, and get his respect. First off I catch Ukon and head collar him using the patented one-armed trick as discussed on another thread, then go to take him into the Round pen. But oh! Riley sees grass which he hasn't investigated and he goes in first. Doh.

...
Now, I know you use that term over the pond, but it makes me giggle to hear it used in my own country!
Halter, m'dear! :)

...you will be more disappointed by the things you didn’t do than by the ones you did do. ... Explore. Dream. Discover.”
–Mark Twain
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post #136 of 306 Old 10-20-2012, 10:13 AM
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Originally Posted by aspin231 View Post
Now, I know you use that term over the pond, but it makes me giggle to hear it used in my own country!
Halter, m'dear! :)
Hahah No - In the UK a halter is something made of rope and/or canvas
It was always considered the 'cheap' alternative and the sort of thing that got left on horses sold at auction though welsh cobs are traditionally shown in hand in white canvas halters
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post #137 of 306 Old 10-20-2012, 10:24 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by aspin231 View Post
Now, I know you use that term over the pond, but it makes me giggle to hear it used in my own country!
Halter, m'dear! :)
And funnily enough when I've been typing I have actually paused and considered which word to use - the one I've been using all my life, or the one which I've recently adopted to avoid confusion! As you can see, I've been taking the traditionalist approach..... Up to now!

Get up, get going, seize the day. Enjoy the sunshine, the rain, cloudy days, snowstorms, and thunder. Getting on your horse is always worth the effort.
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post #138 of 306 Old 10-25-2012, 10:05 PM Thread Starter
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Musings on Enforced Rest

Since I've been a horse owner, I have had the following happen to me and my horse(s) which have forced us to take a break from riding:

Pregnancy
Childcare issues
Check Ligament damage
Knee injury
Abcess
Chiropractor treatment
Severe allergic reaction
Knee injury (again)
Check ligament (again!)
Moving country
Broken arm

Each one, apart from the pregnancy and country move was unplanned and unwelcome. However! Every single time either I or my horse(s) have had a period of enforced box rest I have admitted at the time that taking time out from riding and being forced to do groundwork, or just plain old care and bonding have been good for us. It has always always forced me to slow down, chill out, and take the pressure of my horse. And this has always been to our mutual benefit.

My broken arm now is forcing me to do what I would have advised anyone on here to do with new horses - take time to let them settle in, get to know them on the ground, relax and step back. And I am loving it! Yes, I am looking forward to getting back in to the saddle but this is a really good wake up call to take things at a pace that works for the horses as well as for my 'achievement timetable'.

Get up, get going, seize the day. Enjoy the sunshine, the rain, cloudy days, snowstorms, and thunder. Getting on your horse is always worth the effort.
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post #139 of 306 Old 10-25-2012, 10:18 PM Thread Starter
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Shopping

Went shopping yesterday with a friend who was able to advise me on glove purchase. How stupid does that sound? I'm 42 and really should be able to choose a good pair of winter gloves for myself. But here's the rub: my life experience is of British Winters. These are invariably wet, with quite a lot of damp, all shrouded in fairly Chilly. That's not what it is here of course- here is cold, with large amounts of cold on top, and snow that is almost always not wet but is most definitely cold.

I had been looking at gloves in the shops paralysed with indecision, and didn't realise it until friend said "buy these ones" OHH! I said - so the leather ones are good because they're tough and warm, and of course there is no WET to make them die a sad and crusty death! Never in England would I have contemplated buying thick leather gloves for the winter!

Next step Boots Mmmm I love boots. Thick ones, thin ones, smart ones, tough ones, I love them all. The opportunity to go out and spend large money on a pair of Sorels (see, I am learning about brands) is filling me with joy
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Get up, get going, seize the day. Enjoy the sunshine, the rain, cloudy days, snowstorms, and thunder. Getting on your horse is always worth the effort.
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post #140 of 306 Old 11-02-2012, 11:31 PM Thread Starter
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English English - Canadian English

Pants - underwear
Knickers - panties
Trousers - pants
Break - recess
Petrol - gas
Gas - natural gas
Rotovator - rototiller
Jump start - boost
Lovely - awesome
Super - awesome
Great- awesome
Brilliant - awesome
Wonderful - awesome
Isn't it? - eh?
See? - eh?
See - eh
. - eh
When it snows - when snow flies (I love that one :) )
Snowing - snowstorm
Snowing - light flurries
Snowing - snows flying
Good doer - easy keeper
Nappy - herd bound
Nappy - buddy sour
Nappy - barn sour
Nappy - diaper
Shop - store
Workshop - shop
Detached garage - shop
(Stable)yard - barn
Barn - barn
Garden - yard
Front garden - yard
Back garden - yard
Some acres of land that we own - yard
Pretty flower beds - garden
Tea - steeped tea
Tea - black tea
Herbal tea - tea
Green tea - tea
'Tea, white, one' - black tea, with milk and sugar
Disgusting sweetened flavoured hot drink made out of cinammon and other stuff - chai tea
Bridleway - trail (though not an exact translation)
Hacking out - trail riding
Towing - hauling
Trailing - hauling
Horse Lorry - a what???
Hard feed - grain
Hay - grass hay (as opposed to the alfalfa mix hay which is more common)
Fuel efficient vehicle - why?
MPG - ha ha you're English aren't you?
Kilometres - clicks (slang, don't know how it's spelt)
Firelighter - firestarter

That's all I can think of now

Get up, get going, seize the day. Enjoy the sunshine, the rain, cloudy days, snowstorms, and thunder. Getting on your horse is always worth the effort.
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