Gaining Trust With Flap Jack - Page 3 - The Horse Forum
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post #21 of 30 Old 07-24-2012, 10:43 AM Thread Starter
Weanling
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Horsnaround64 View Post
You need to do all the steps as she did before. He needs this form you and him to be safe. If he had good ground manners he would have never ran anyone over. Start over and you will have a great horse And you both will be safe . Becareful
He ran her over because he started to buck while she was leading him and I was in him only really stepped on her leg
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post #22 of 30 Old 07-24-2012, 10:46 AM
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Get a driving whip if you can - easier to handle than a lunge whip so you can be a bit more precise about where you flick him. And they're also easier to use when free lunging in an arena or paddock. My tool of choice! Do you have a small arena you can free lunge in? Friendlier on the joints than working on circles.
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post #23 of 30 Old 07-24-2012, 10:48 AM
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He should never run onto someone - I understand a green horse spooking and running, but it should always be away from people. A horse that runs over a person has no respect for them.
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post #24 of 30 Old 07-24-2012, 10:50 AM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EvilHorseOfDoom View Post
Get a driving whip if you can - easier to handle than a lunge whip so you can be a bit more precise about where you flick him. And they're also easier to use when free lunging in an arena or paddock. My tool of choice! Do you have a small arena you can free lunge in? Friendlier on the joints than working on circles.
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no small area until he gets moved to my house. Do you have a link to a good driving whip?
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post #25 of 30 Old 07-24-2012, 11:06 AM
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I'll find you a link to my favourite in the morning - it's nearly midnight here. It's a bit more expensive than some ($60 approx) but it has great balance and feel, and a good quality lash.
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post #26 of 30 Old 07-24-2012, 11:13 AM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by EvilHorseOfDoom View Post
I'll find you a link to my favourite in the morning - it's nearly midnight here. It's a bit more expensive than some ($60 approx) but it has great balance and feel, and a good quality lash.
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Ok thanks
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post #27 of 30 Old 07-24-2012, 12:13 PM
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Evil horse said it perfectly, just because his old owners did ground with him desn't mean the lessons will travel over to you, sure he knows to move his ass when you flick a rope at it, but the respect? No.
And don't say you've taken the right amount of time because you didn't immediately jump in the saddle, taking the right amount of time when the horse is ready. Yes you have to push them, but not drag them.
Excuse my bluntness but I'm also worried about your experience. The fact that you said the horse you've trained before was the best you own, compared to a really nice horse, well, doen tell anybody much. Have you ever rode a Professionarily trained horse? It's like a punch in the gut at first when you think back to all of your hard work on your own horses, but it makes you better. Strive for lightness and suppleness with your colt, and really instill the basics before jumping forward.

Also, realize it takes a whole lot of time to train a speed/barrel horse. Patterning him will take you at the very least 6 months and than MAYBE you can go faster than a slow lope. And that's after you have him nice and broke.
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post #28 of 30 Old 07-24-2012, 12:36 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Malice View Post
Evil horse said it perfectly, just because his old owners did ground with him desn't mean the lessons will travel over to you, sure he knows to move his ass when you flick a rope at it, but the respect? No.
And don't say you've taken the right amount of time because you didn't immediately jump in the saddle, taking the right amount of time when the horse is ready. Yes you have to push them, but not drag them.
Excuse my bluntness but I'm also worried about your experience. The fact that you said the horse you've trained before was the best you own, compared to a really nice horse, well, doen tell anybody much. Have you ever rode a Professionarily trained horse? It's like a punch in the gut at first when you think back to all of your hard work on your own horses, but it makes you better. Strive for lightness and suppleness with your colt, and really instill the basics before jumping forward.

Also, realize it takes a whole lot of time to train a speed/barrel horse. Patterning him will take you at the very least 6 months and than MAYBE you can go faster than a slow lope. And that's after you have him nice and broke.
Yes I have rode some professionaly broke horses and either it is the same as my horse or sometimes worse than mine. And for barrel racing who knows if I am actually going to do it.

If the trainer at the barn I am at would have trained him they would have been riding him at a w/t/l by now(if they could get on him they thought he was a bucker even if you would try to put pressure on him), and they go fast with there training. They had a 2 year old at the barn that they trained to do w/t/l in a 30 day period and that included starting from saddling.
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post #29 of 30 Old 07-24-2012, 01:13 PM
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my filly did that one>:( i was so mad.. i was just walking her and she stepped right INTO my boot when she was running.. OMG it hurt so bad.. grr did i work her and make her realize "this is my space I DONT CARE what scared you.. you dont come into MY SPACE" lol

http://www.horseforum.com/member-journals/sunnys-thread-160521/ << read about Sunny and I. Our journey
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post #30 of 30 Old 07-24-2012, 10:06 PM
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Here we go. I think mine was the 66in version - I didn't buy it online, I got it from my local saddlery, but unfortunately they don't sell them there anymore so when I lost this one (I'm a forgetful idiot lol) I had no choice but to buy their cheapie one which doesn't have anywhere near the balance and control of the one I had originally. So the extra $$ are well worth it - feels like an extension of the arm, rather than a stick.
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