natural horsemanship exercises to improve your bond:
 
 

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natural horsemanship exercises to improve your bond:

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  • Natural horsemanship exercise
  • Exercises for your horse to bond

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    06-05-2011, 10:30 PM
  #1
Started
natural horsemanship exercises to improve your bond:

Neigh there horsey people!!

My beautiful pony and I have been dramtically improving our bond with natural horsemanship :)


At the age of only 13 I have already helped heal horses who have been abused, made a pony who wouldn't get on a float, horses that refuse to be caught and many many more things.

In this entry I would like to tell you just a simple way to improve your bond with your equine friends

THE GAME:

This will improve the bond with you pony/ horse.

Walk infront of your pony on a loose line with him trailing behind you.
He should be completley foccused on you.
Stop suddenly at a random time and if he keeps walking throw yours arms in the air and wave them around (don't do it with people watching because they might mistake you as a lunatic lol) until your horse steps back.
Praise him and try again walking forward and stopping suddenly. He should stop the second you stop; if he doesn't try again with the arms.

Once he understands try in a trot.

Once practicing for a little bit everyday (or when ever possible) you should be able to do it without any equiptment (halter, lead)


HINT: Don't use food treats as praise but instead give him a small rub on the forehead (horses LOVE that!!)



If you have any questions or have a trouble pony etc you need help with please post a comment and I'll get back to you

Thankyou
     
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    06-06-2011, 12:39 AM
  #2
Yearling
All horses should be taught to stop when the handler stops period. More so respecting my space than bond but hey if that's what they call it nowadays... Then I hope everyone bonds with their horses.
     
    06-06-2011, 01:50 AM
  #3
Green Broke
Curious question. How many problem horses have you actually worked with at 13 years old?
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    06-06-2011, 02:28 AM
  #4
Banned
Marlea, this might have worked for you so far, but I am not sure it is the best advise. Having a horse behind you on a loose lead when it is a horse with no manners could have you walked on. When you wave your arms around like that, the horse could spook and run off, dragging you with it, or pulling the lead rope from your hands.

I am glad it has worked for you so far, but I am not certain it always will. My former horse would have trampled you in a second.
     
    06-06-2011, 02:32 AM
  #5
Started
Ok... not the responces I was hoping for (lol)

Howclever- I have rescued 4 saleyard horses and have brought them back up to full potential again, trained my friends terror of a horse to float, joined up with several horses and heaps more things. Age has no boundries.


AlexS- You can simply shake the lead or push him back or use a slight manouver of your hands
     
    06-06-2011, 02:49 AM
  #6
Banned
My former horse would rear and take your head off, if you did not move in time, if you shook the lead rope at her. It meant nothing to her and just annoyed her.

If you can shake a lead and get results, I think the horses you have had were better trained than you thought they were.
     
    06-06-2011, 03:21 AM
  #7
Started
Ok fine... scrap and stuff that idea then

HEAD TO TAIL

A flexing exercise

Take your horses tail and put it towards his head at the same time push his nose to the tail so he's touching it... I can't explain this very well so heres a rough picture I found on the internet. When you have yours horses neck like this get his tail and make him sniff it (haha)
Now do the other way
WARNING: this wont work with buckers, but I can give you advise to stop bucking too if you want
Attached Images
File Type: jpg clintonflex200[1].jpg (13.2 KB, 360 views)
     
    06-06-2011, 09:33 AM
  #8
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by AlexS    
Marlea, this might have worked for you so far, but I am not sure it is the best advise. Having a horse behind you on a loose lead when it is a horse with no manners could have you walked on. When you wave your arms around like that, the horse could spook and run off, dragging you with it, or pulling the lead rope from your hands.

I am glad it has worked for you so far, but I am not certain it always will. My former horse would have trampled you in a second.
Sorry, I have to agree with this post. And age does have some limitations. Experience being the main one. I think you know most when you realize how much you have left to learn.

Anyway, great job so far in retraining the horses! But please remember some horses won't respond the same way and it can be very dangerous...
     
    06-06-2011, 12:22 PM
  #9
Green Broke
Why won't the flexing exercise work with buckers?

Just curious.
Posted via Mobile Device
     
    06-06-2011, 06:49 PM
  #10
Yearling
That flexing exercise seems like it would over flex the horse? I thought you were only supposed to bring their head to your boot, or your shoulder.... or am I mistaken?
     

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