Congenital lateral patellar (sub)luxation
 
 

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Congenital lateral patellar (sub)luxation

This is a discussion on Congenital lateral patellar (sub)luxation within the Miniature Horses forums, part of the Horse Breeds category
  • Dislocated patella equine
  • Luxating patella in horses

 
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    05-03-2013, 02:30 PM
  #1
Yearling
Congenital lateral patellar (sub)luxation

My stallion has just been diagnosed with the above, so I was wondering if anyone on here has ever dealt with it before as it is very common in small breads eg Miniature horses and british Shetlands. The vet said it isn't bad enough to need operated on but he is have a lot of trouble right now with his legs. A couple of days after his lameness exam to find out why he is always stiff his patella dislocated about 5 days ago now and is still lame, he is on box rest and pain killers but I was wondering how over people treated their horses/ponies also I was wondering if there was anything that will help prevent his knee caps from dislocating as the vet said there wasn't anything but I want to try my ****edest to get him and keep him sound and he is my heart horse.

Sorry for the long story and I hope it makes sense.
     
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    05-03-2013, 05:47 PM
  #2
Started
Ah m'dear, I'm so sorry you are dealing with this. It is VERY common in Minis, and has been discussed in great detail and many times on the Li'l Beginnings Mini Horse forum. Worth your joining that forum I think.

Definitely genetic. Definitely the horse should be taken out of your breeding programme.

Lizzie
     
    05-03-2013, 06:23 PM
  #3
Yearling
He will be, we are trying to find a new stallion that is not related to him but there is nothing that is anywhere near half as good as him, the only problem is I have read a few studies that say it is ressive which means my mare carries it too so I think most shetland lines will carry it, also he has already had 6 foals thankfully only one for me not so thankfully the vet diagnosed her with it we wouldn't have but anything to him last year but we only found out about his legs last weeks and before a couple of months ago he was relatively sound.
     
    05-03-2013, 06:37 PM
  #4
Green Broke
How very unfortunate! Im sorry to hear. But on the upside I am glad you are making the responsible decision to remove him from your breeding program. That is why I am a firm believer in breeding only registered horses, it is so much easier to track pedigrees and spot genetic disorders if you know where an animal comes from.
Best of luck, hope the little fellow improves soon.
     
    05-04-2013, 12:11 AM
  #5
Yearling
He is a registered british shetland pony therefore you can track every single line of his back to the 1800's when the stud book began yet neither his breeder or me the only people to have ever owned him knew as it must have just been hiding as it pedigree is chocked full of the best of the best shetland ponies to walk this earth and he is no doubt one of them.
     
    05-04-2013, 08:18 AM
  #6
Started
It is a common problem in several dog breeds. Mostly smaller breeds. Years ago I purchased a dog. He cost me over $3,000, which in those days was a heck of a lot of money. I showed him to his championship, which I do with most of my dogs before breeding. This was in the days before genetic testing came about. As he grew older, I discovered he had a patella problem and was also obviously in pain. In his first and only litter, there were two girls and three boys. I had kept two boys and immediately neutered them. One boy went to a friend of mine who trained dogs for the movies. He was also neutered. Both girls went to friends who spayed them, since they were not to be used for breeding. I had to neuter my beautiful show dog. Killed me to have to do it.

I did inform his breeder, but she didn't want to hear about it. Sadly, all these years later, she is still breeding this same line of dogs.

Unfortunately, when dealing with animals, things don't always work out as one would like. We have to bite the bullet and deal with it responsibly, or breed from animals with problems and say nothing.

Lizzie
     
    05-06-2013, 01:10 AM
  #7
Green Broke
Just for the record I wasnt putting down your little fella :). I was responding to you tracking his relatives (which told me he is registered) and more giving kudos for you being so responsible. How is he doing by the way?
     
    05-06-2013, 07:40 AM
  #8
Yearling
The swelling is going down and he is getting sounder by the day, so another couple of weeks he will be back out with his friends.
     
    05-06-2013, 09:15 AM
  #9
Started
Are you gelding him before placing him back with the herd?

Lizzie
     
    05-06-2013, 10:11 AM
  #10
Yearling
No because he lives with colts, geldings and stallions.
     

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