miniature vs. pony - Page 2
 
 

       The Horse Forum > Horse Breeds, Breeding, and Genetics > Horse Breeds > Miniature Horses

miniature vs. pony

This is a discussion on miniature vs. pony within the Miniature Horses forums, part of the Horse Breeds category
  • Mini horse vs mini pony
  • Miniature pony vs miniature horses

 
LinkBack Thread Tools
    09-21-2010, 08:26 PM
  #11
Trained
I went to a driving class and saw several different "minis", but to me, only some looked like horses.
mini1.jpg


mini2.jpg


mini3.jpg

Edited to add: it was a great show. Congrats to all are in order.

I found this on the web:
THE AMERICAN MINIATURE HORSE OFFICIAL STANDARD OF PERFECTION
General Impression: A small, sound, well-balanced horse, possessing the correct conformation characteristics required of most breeds. Refinement and femininity in the mare. Boldness and masculinity in the stallion. The general impression should be one of symmetry, strength, agility and alertness. Since the breed objective is the smallest possible perfect horse, preference in judging shall be given the smaller horse, other characteristics being approximately equal.
Size: Must measure not more than 34 inches at the withers, at the last hairs of the mane for AMHA or 38" for AMHR. HEAD: In proportion to length of neck and body. Broad forehead with large prominent eyes, set wide apart. Comparatively short distance between eyes and muzzle. Profile straight or slightly concave below the eyes. Large nostrils. Clean, refined muzzle. Even bite.
Ears: Medium in size. Pointed. Carried alertly, with tips curving slightly inward.
Throat Latch: Clean and well defined, allowing ample flexion at the poll.
Legs: Set straight and parallel when viewed from front or back. Straight, true and squarely set, when viewed from the side with hooves pointing directly ahead. Pasterns sloping about 45 degrees and blending smoothly, with no change of angle, from the hooves to the ground. Hooves to be round and compact, trimmed as short as practicable for an unshod horse. Smooth, fluid gait in motion.
Color: Any color or marking patterns, and any eye color, is equally acceptable. The hair should be lustrous and silky.
Show Disqualifications: Excess height. Monorchidism in Senior Stallions. Any unsoundness or inheritable deformity. If in doubt, the show Judge may request the opinion of the show Veterinarian. Non-disfiguring blemishes not associated witlh unsoundness, or injuries which are temporary, should not be penalized unless they impair the general appearance and or action of the horse




So, it seems pretty subjective to me, other than as dirtymartini suggests a foal of two registered minis should be a registered mini, but may not be show material.
     
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
    09-21-2010, 08:30 PM
  #12
Trained
Then I found this, which is more my understanding (other than the age statement at the end):

Many horse experts will tell you that any full grown equine that measures under 14.2 hands at the withers is classified as a pony. This isn’t always the case, however. A pony is typically considered an equine under 58 inches tall when it reaches adult height, but a pony also has other distinctive characteristics other than just its small size. For example, most pony breeds have thick, broad bodies and thick necks. They also have legs that are proportionately shorter for their body than a horse exhibits. Some pony breeds also have broad heads, especially through the forehead, along with larger eyes. Some ponies also have large hooves for their size.
On the other hand, miniature horses are even smaller than most pony breeds. Most registries won’t allow membership to a mini that’s taller than 34 inches when full grown. There are miniature horses, however, as tall as 38 inches. A miniature horse is also built differently than a pony. Ideally, a mini is a scaled-down version of a horse, with a slimmer build than a pony, and longer legs for its size. The head is also in proportion to the body, as are the feet. Also, a miniature horse does not have the heavy bone often associated with pony breeds. In essence, a miniature horse is usually more refined than a typical pony. A mini is longer lived than most ponies, too. They have an average life span of 25-35 years.
     
    09-21-2010, 09:16 PM
  #13
Started
Quote:
Originally Posted by iridehorses    
Their breeding goal is to develop the smallest possible horse that maintains the correct conformity and the smallest of the breed is considered more desirable.
And I gelded our little 26" stallion I have been chewed out by more than one mini breeder as he has the looks and the size. I didn't want to deal with a stud no matter what the size!
     
    09-22-2010, 05:24 AM
  #14
Foal
I have a miniture pony shesz georgeous
     
    09-22-2010, 08:24 PM
  #15
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by trigz    
i have a miniture pony shesz georgeous
A miniature PONY? So it's like 20" high or what?
     
    09-23-2010, 12:36 PM
  #16
Yearling
This is how I see it. If it look like a horse, it's a horse. I have a 13 hh horse. She is not a pony. Ponys have very thick manes and tails and they are just different. She has the skinny mane, she is just a small horse.

I have a pony, that is 34" tall. He is not a miniature horse becuase he looks like a pony, he has thick mane, and that cute pony face. His legs are very stocky, nothing like the stork-legs of miniature horses I have seen.
     
    09-23-2010, 05:58 PM
  #17
Trained
^^ I agree, ChevyPrincess!
     
    09-29-2010, 04:45 AM
  #18
Started
A "horse" or "pony" is a miniature if it is 38" or less. If a shetland is under 38", it is also a miniature in addition to being a shetland pony (there are lots out there who are double registered). If two miniatures produce a foal who goes over 38", the foal is no longer a miniature.

Now, ponies is more up for debate IMO. *I* call anything under 14.2h a pony. But some breeds of horses are smaller and they do NOT appreciate being called a pony. Why, IDK, I happen to be a HUGE pony fan :)
     
    10-07-2010, 06:16 PM
  #19
Foal
That is a hard question to answer because there are many variables...there are 2 size classes for miniatures,34-under and 34-38..both sizes are to look as close to a horse as possible..unfortunately in down sizing the breed the majority of the 34 under look big bodied with short legs..34-38's are usually more "leggy"... Now they are adding Shetland (not the fat roly poly one's most think about) but the 'Modern,Classic style that look more "arabian"...Those Shetlands are also crossed with Hackneys for more action..I have a Shetland by breeding, but because he is 35" he is registered as AMHR, American Miniature Horse Registry...34: and under are registered with the American miniature Horse Association....the 2 clubs have their own shows and are seperate clubs, tho you can have a Mini that is registered AMHA/AMHR...confusing, I know...Minis are adorable and their like potato chips, one is not enough!
     
    10-07-2010, 06:23 PM
  #20
Foal
Sorry but miniature horses DO have heavy manes and thick tails...Most that are shown have had their manes pulled and undershaved...small minis tend to have shorter legs and shorter thicker necks that the 34" and up...all of them look like wolly bears in the winter and should be shaved when the weather is warmer...at one time anything 38" and under could be hardshipped as a mini. Now I think they are closing some of the hardshipping.
     

Thread Tools

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
My first miniature! bunnykit Miniature Horses 19 12-16-2010 12:30 PM
10" Miniature Horse/Pony saddle Bluelover Tack and Equipment Classifieds 2 12-04-2009 07:25 PM
Miniature horses anyone? mysnafflebit Horse Breeds 12 11-26-2008 11:18 PM
WANTED;; miniature/pony cart and/or harness cowgirl4jesus94 Driving 1 06-29-2008 12:51 AM
Miniature for Sale whinruss Tack and Equipment Classifieds 0 05-03-2007 11:19 PM



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 04:01 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0