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About riding bitless...

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    12-30-2012, 06:17 PM
  #21
Banned
Quote:
Originally Posted by Muppetgirl    
Yes you are......actually you're a meanie doodie poopie head barn witch!
Sweet!!
     
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    12-30-2012, 07:42 PM
  #22
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by ACowgirlThing778    
ALL OF YOU ARE WRONG!!!!! ANY HORSE CAN BE RIDDEN BITTLESS!!!!!! As a matter of fact, I ride bareback and bittless everyday! How would you like it if some human shoved metal into your mouth and started yanking you around with it! At least look at how a horse is controlled with a bit ... when a horse feels pressure, they move off of pressure. You r not pulling the horse to the side, you r putting pressure on one side of the mouth and the horse is moving off of that pressure. When you put a bit into a horses mouth, you are not only creating pressure but also pain in some cases. And don't think that you can't cause pain in a snaffle because to can cause pain in any bit.. if you use a rope halter, you cause not pain and only pressure!

This post just proved the whole point of this thread...good job ACowgirlThing778!
     
    12-31-2012, 07:26 AM
  #23
Foal
I have been taught that you ride bitless (for both rider and horse) until you don't need a bridle at all, then you ride bridleless. Once bridleless is good you then ride with a bit to help shape, not control, the horse.
I realise that this is not the reality for most folks, but it is an ideal to aspire to and gives you a good idea where you are on the path of your and your horses development.
It also places a nice emphasis on what the bit is actually supposed to be used for. It is to help shape the horses flexion (lateral and vertical) whilst the body is controlling where the horses feet actually go. Again this is the ideal to aspire to and again it gives a good benchmark as to where refinement is needed in both yours and your horses training.
     
    12-31-2012, 09:48 AM
  #24
Foal
I ride my gelding in just a rope halter and have for the past 11 years, he is now 14. I owned both his parents and also am the only person who has ever ridden him. I see a lot of folks ride horses in just halters that have no business doing it and it's quite scary. My horse is very light in the halter, takes both leads from a stand still on the straight away, side passes, backs forever with barely a lift of the reins and does a pretty fair 360 spin although nothing compared to a finished reining horse. I have ridden him on trails that most people would not even think of going on and have always trusted him 100% where ever I point him. He may be the exception to the rule, I don't know, but I would not trade him for anything on this earth. He will die on our place and be buried next to his father.
Pegasus1 likes this.
     
    12-31-2012, 10:07 AM
  #25
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by ACowgirlThing778    
ALL OF YOU ARE WRONG!!!!! ANY HORSE CAN BE RIDDEN BITTLESS!!!!!! As a matter of fact, I ride bareback and bittless everyday! how would you like it if some human shoved metal into your mouth and started yanking you around with it! At least look at how a horse is controlled with a bit ... when a horse feels pressure, they move off of pressure. You r not pulling the horse to the side, you r putting pressure on one side of the mouth and the horse is moving off of that pressure. When you put a bit into a horses mouth, you are not only creating pressure but also pain in some cases. And don't think that you can't cause pain in a snaffle because to can cause pain in any bit.. if you use a rope halter, you cause not pain and only pressure!
Now why would you put a bit in a horse's mouth and start yanking them around? I use a bit and I don't yank my horse around. You don't HAVE to do that with a bit you know, and if you DO yank your horse around....then shame on you.
     
    12-31-2012, 10:48 AM
  #26
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pegasus1    
I have been taught that you ride bitless (for both rider and horse) until you don't need a bridle at all, then you ride bridleless. Once bridleless is good you then ride with a bit to help shape, not control, the horse.
I realise that this is not the reality for most folks, but it is an ideal to aspire to and gives you a good idea where you are on the path of your and your horses development.
It also places a nice emphasis on what the bit is actually supposed to be used for. It is to help shape the horses flexion (lateral and vertical) whilst the body is controlling where the horses feet actually go. Again this is the ideal to aspire to and again it gives a good benchmark as to where refinement is needed in both yours and your horses training.
I think you might have that back wards. Look at some of the best trainers who do bridleless riding. Argubaly THE best at it is Stacy Westfall. She starts all her horses in a bit then works to bridleless and then... Bridleless is the end results of good training. Bridleless/bitless does not produce good training or a well trained sort horse. There is no way to make your cues light enough and be responsive enough to get the horse as light as at least I want.
     
    12-31-2012, 10:54 AM
  #27
Banned
Quote:
Originally Posted by nrhareiner    
I think you might have that back wards. Look at some of the best trainers who do bridleless riding. Argubaly THE best at it is Stacy Westfall. She starts all her horses in a bit then works to bridleless and then... Bridleless is the end results of good training. Bridleless/bitless does not produce good training or a well trained sort horse. There is no way to make your cues light enough and be responsive enough to get the horse as light as at least I want.
And along with this, I do believe the Vaqueros start their horses in a bosal and build up to a bosal And a bit, then they quit using the bosal all together once the horse is resposive and light, then they graduate them through bits up to a spade bit. There are exceptions to this rule, but that is how they train a very light and responsive bridle horse......I want one!
     
    12-31-2012, 11:40 AM
  #28
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pegasus1    
I have been taught that you ride bitless (for both rider and horse) until you don't need a bridle at all, then you ride bridleless. Once bridleless is good you then ride with a bit to help shape, not control, the horse...
I believe you were taught wrong. Of course bits were and are used for control. That does NOT mean they are used to punish a horse or to inflict pain, but they are important means of control.

I spent much of my adult life on a flightline. F-4s, F-111s & even a tour in the EA-6B at Whidbey Island. When you walked out on a flightline, there were jets running. Even if you were the first launch of the day, there would be someone running a powercart or doing an engine check. There is a reason we wore earplugs, and there is a reason my hearing is marginal after years doing that. You often had to shout at someone to be heard. You sometimes had to touch them so they would know you wanted them and could focus on you.

Of course, in a library that isn't true. You don't start shouting in a library, and you shouldn't need to grab someone to get them to pay attention to you.

Horses are like that. A relaxed horse, walking in an arena, is in the library. When Mia is in a library, her listening is acute. She can 'hear' my legs, and she can hear it bitless when I take some slack out of the reins. It is easy to hear, in a library.

But horses don't always walk in an arena, and some horses are more excitable than others. And when a horse gets excited - fear, joy, speed, another horse, etc - they leave the library and go to the flightline. Horses are emotional creatures, and their emotions cause background noise. As their emotions get stronger, their ability to 'hear' becomes less.

A horse who sees a coyote just ahead and is afraid, or a horse focused on working cattle, or Mia when she gets to run next to another horse...they're on a flightline surrounded by jet engines. You need some way to cut thru their emotional noise and get them back in touch with YOU. And that is why we have bits.

A bit isn't there to cause pain. It isn't a torture device. It doesn't punish a horse. It is a communication device. The reins are like telegraph wires, sending signals to one of the horse's most sensitive receptors: the mouth.

A bit is an amplifier. It helps get past the emotional noise and help a horse hear his rider. Used at the wrong time, in a library, it is a painful blast of noise. Used on the flightline, it is a critical tool allowing communication. During the in-between places, it allows more subtle communication - talking instead of just waiving arms or pointing.

A harsh bit isn't cruel. It is a strong amplifier. Maybe even the equivalent of when the crew chief for a jet puts on headphones and plugs into the aircraft intercom, so he can hear the pilot speaking. There are no cruel bits, only bits that are stronger than needed or used to shout when a whisper would do.

I rode bitless for 3 years because I bought in to the YouTube Gurus - the videos of how bits are cruel, or people like Rick Gore:
"Answer:Metal bits in the mouth = Less Horsemanship, more pain, and a lack of partnership between horse and rider...Pain rarely makes a horse feel safe! Bits = Pain, especially when both rider and horse get scared and or nervous."
I was wrong, and so are the Internet Gurus who preach bitless without understanding why bits are used. That doesn't make bitless wrong. For a lot of horses and a lot of riders, bitless is all it takes. My Appy/Arabian gelding is a much calmer horse than Mia. He prefers a bit, but he is quite safe to ride bitless. Some horses NEVER leave the library. Others, like Mia, spend very little time there - so pick the tool that matches your horse and your riding.

Internet picture that brings back memories:


     
    12-31-2012, 03:31 PM
  #29
Foal
A rope attachment is a mild mild mild bitless attachment, but I do school my horse in a hanging cheek, I find the sweet metal bits are better for horses though.
     
    12-31-2012, 03:33 PM
  #30
Showing
Quote:
Originally Posted by BBBCrone    
Sweet!!
Get in line behind the rest of us, Missie!
BBBCrone and Muppetgirl like this.
     

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