adopted reining horse - The Horse Forum
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post #1 of 6 Old 11-12-2012, 09:55 AM Thread Starter
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adopted reining horse

I adopted a rescued
Horse 6 months ago.The previos owner claims she was a reining horse.She is very sweet.My daughter has ridden her bareback.She took to the saddle ok untill the flaps made contact,then she freaked.What could the reason be for this.
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post #2 of 6 Old 11-12-2012, 08:11 PM
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I have no real experience with this, but I'd think that she's either scared of it, or (if she is a reiner) she might have very sensitive sides and my slapping the stirrups down she thought you meant go.
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post #3 of 6 Old 11-12-2012, 08:31 PM
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^ Agreed.

Some reiners will scoot right out from under you if you don't ride quiet enough.

I would suggest finding a trainer to do all this stuff for you....
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Pssh.I didn't pick up the wrong lead
It's called a counter canter...
...A very advanced maneuver.
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post #4 of 6 Old 11-12-2012, 08:39 PM
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Some trainers train their reiners such that they flap their legs prior to using the big spurs(during training) so that the hose learns to react just from the flap of the leg this may well be what you are experiencing. Does she have any old spur marks? I would bet that is what this is. Reiners are super sensitive, regardless. That is how the are trained
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post #5 of 6 Old 11-12-2012, 09:06 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by franknbeans View Post
Some trainers train their reiners such that they flap their legs prior to using the big spurs(during training) so that the hose learns to react just from the flap of the leg this may well be what you are experiencing. Does she have any old spur marks? I would bet that is what this is. Reiners are super sensitive, regardless. That is how the are trained
Yup, totally agree! A quiet seat and a quiet hand is what you want if your on a well trained reining horse......some of them you just think about what you want to do next and they do it!!! I suspect they detect the slight imperceptibal physical changes in seat etc.....even though we don't know we are doing it.....those are the fun ones to ride!!!
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post #6 of 6 Old 11-13-2012, 10:17 AM
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If this horse was campaigned this could be a sign of stress. Try saddling her off side instead and if she stands, promptly offer a treat. What doesn't work on one side often work on the other. Horses that like to lean on a farrier will often stop when the farrier changes the sequence. If one of you holds her while the other saddles, be sure both of you are on the same side. I'd also do this out in the open and not in the confines of a barn. If she still has to move, stay by her saddle area and follow her if she circles. She'll likely quit after two or three, then saddle her. Don't worry about the pad, just saddle her, walk her then remove it. Then put her away and leave her alone. That's a huge reward for a horse.
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