Advice on handling new horse
 
 

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Advice on handling new horse

This is a discussion on Advice on handling new horse within the Natural Horsemanship forums, part of the Training Horses category
  • How to spot a mellow horse
  • Handling a new horse

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    03-04-2013, 11:53 AM
  #1
Foal
Advice on handling new horse

I am actually looking for possibly a website or article that might have information on handling horses, and how to teach them to respect you. I do not have an issue (usually) with this, but there is someone in our barn that just got a new horse. The horse is too much for him, as this person is very green.. horse has been neglected and is about 200 lbs under weight, about 16.2 hands TB. He will not listen to me when I make suggestions on how to handle the horse but he likes to read all about horses so I was hoping maybe someone could point me in a direction that he could read for himself what he should be doing. Right now, he lets the horse walk all over him- he says "Oh he's my boy, he loves me, he trusts me, he wouldnt hurt me".. but there is nothing being done to encourage any respect from the horse. If the horse wants to stand there and be held, then great, but if the horse tries to pull his head away from him.. he just lets him go. "Ok boy, you can go now, I know you don't want to stay here." He was reluctant to be wormed- and he said "oh don't worm him today, he's in a bad mood. He doesnt want to do it". These are literal quotes from him.. I try to explain to him how it works in the horse's world with respect etc. He doesnt listen, I know nothing. As frustrating as that is, I am just trying to help. This horse is large, and once he gets the weight back on him could be very dangerous if he is allowed to do whatever he "wants" to do. Any suggestions???
     
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    03-04-2013, 12:11 PM
  #2
Showing
Withhold the advice and ignore what is happening. It's not your horse and it's apparent the owner isn't prepared to listen. If he gets hurt, that's his choice. He's made it this far in life without your protecting him and that's the way he wants it to continue.
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    03-04-2013, 12:14 PM
  #3
Trained
It's hard to watch, but find something else to do, instead. AND, give them both a wide berth.
     
    03-04-2013, 12:28 PM
  #4
Super Moderator
Sorry, but I have to agree with the others. He will not accept advice unless he asks for it himself. You could, however, invite him to join HERE! He might start to see himself in many of the situations that crop up here regularly.
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    03-04-2013, 12:33 PM
  #5
Foal
Its easier said than done to turn the other cheek- As much as he doesnt listen when I say things, he does ask for help in some things. I was the one he asked to worm his horse for him.. then he tells me nevermind because his horse wasnt in the mood for it (horse was just moving his mouth away from the syringe.. nothing catastrophic). I didnt really know what to say to that.. I just ignored him and wormed his horse anyway and just walked away. He said- "oh, ok good he let you do it". Its not a big barn, there are only 7 horses and 3 are mine. I guess he will figure it out on his own. Just didnt know if there were recommended books on how to handle horses.. I learned by taking advice of other people that know more than me!
     
    03-04-2013, 12:40 PM
  #6
Trained
If he asks for help, tell him that you're not comfortable helping him because he doesn't listen to you and you're afraid he's going to get hurt. If he persists, tell him to look up Clinton Anderson's methods for gaining respect on the ground on YouTube. Then wash your hands of him and walk away.
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    03-04-2013, 12:42 PM
  #7
Super Moderator
Well, there are just tons of books out there. I am not sure which is the best , if a person has to choose only one. You are in a bit of a tough spot. Hopefully, he'll have something happens that turns on the light bulb without knocking it out of his head permanently first.
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    03-04-2013, 12:51 PM
  #8
Trained
Just wanted to add...
There was a chick at my old barn that was similar to this guy you're talking about...only worse. She came over to chat one day with her (bat-crap crazy rescue) mare in tow. Stood there completely ignoring the horse while it grazed on weeds. My best friend and I mentioned that she might want to stop her from eating the weeds, so she pulls the horse's head up, then proceeds to stick her hand in its mouth trying to get the weeds out, all the while baby-talking to the horse. "Eww! Gypsy, don't eat that! It's yucky!" My best friend and I tried to be nice and help this lady, but all we ended up getting for our trouble was me in the emergency room with a fractured ankle (and missing a week of work) and a nasty rumor spread about me that I "abuse" my horse because I smacked him on the flank when he tried to kick me as I was cleaning his hind feet.

I've learned the hard way to steer clear of people like that, even if they beg for help.
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    03-04-2013, 12:53 PM
  #9
Started
I think the sad thing here is this guy needs far more teaching himself befor he tries to teach his horse anything. It's these people who get their hands on natural horsemanship info and end up giving the idea a bad name.
My opinion being said, this guy really needs lessons and experience. It's too bad he didn't get a nice mellow horse to start with, one who would be patient as he learns.
Hopefully getting him to join this forum would help. There are alot of people here with a lot of knowledge and experience. It might help keep him out of the hospital.
Good luck to you in doing what you can...when asked. It would be hard to be in your position.
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    03-04-2013, 01:05 PM
  #10
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dustbunny    
I think the sad thing here is this guy needs far more teaching himself befor he tries to teach his horse anything. It's these people who get their hands on natural horsemanship info and end up giving the idea a bad name.
My opinion being said, this guy really needs lessons and experience. It's too bad he didn't get a nice mellow horse to start with, one who would be patient as he learns.
Hopefully getting him to join this forum would help. There are alot of people here with a lot of knowledge and experience. It might help keep him out of the hospital.
Good luck to you in doing what you can...when asked. It would be hard to be in your position.
Thanks- He asked me when he first learned about this horse what I thought- I told him to steer clear. Look for a mellow horse that you know is safe- not a neglected abused huge TB. Obviously he didnt listen that day either- just said "oh no, he's a good boy, he loves me already and told me he would be a good boy" Yea.. that says it all. I try not to be in the barn when he is in there.. its almost like watching ewwy gooey teenagers that are infatuated with each other.. (puke) haha don't get me wrong, I love love love my horses and dote over them all the time.. but when it comes to doing something- I ask, and they do. Respect is most important. Oh well... time will tell! I will encourage him to join horse forum.. hope he doesnt find my post- he will know Im talking about him! Bahahaha

Thanks everyone for the advice :)
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