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Angry horse

This is a discussion on Angry horse within the Natural Horsemanship forums, part of the Training Horses category
  • Can an angree horse be trained
  • When correcting horse he gets angry

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    07-09-2013, 04:39 PM
  #11
Showing
Quote:
Originally Posted by Blackzodiac    
She asked how can she be a firm leader? She sits by her stall so that the mare can get used to her
Posted via Mobile Device
Sitting by her stall doesn't do anything for their relationship.

Firm leader = does not let the horse do anything naughty and will correct it right away.

Leads the horse, does not let the horse walk all over the place.

Establishes boundaries, doesn't let the horse cross those boundaries.

Rewards horse with release of pressure

Does not shy away from the horse when the horse tests owner

Does not get angry with the horse, or sad with the horse as the horse won't understand what that means.. will insteady be a clear and effective body-language communicator with the horse, while maintaining a neutral emotion.
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    07-09-2013, 05:38 PM
  #12
Green Broke
Horse is not angry..horse is saying it is the boss of you all.

Clearly too.

It is not sitting around feeling sorry for itself, or worrying about the past. They do not think like that.

Correct horse as you were told above, act like horse is NOT the leader and quit trying to psychoanalyze the "horsey" into behaving.
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    07-09-2013, 05:53 PM
  #13
Banned
Im thinking its too much love making her crabby- don't sit outside her stall door and walk by her every few minutes trying to pet her and love on her- just leave her to her own so she can settle down and feel comfortable.

I know the owner is excited about her new horse but things like that can cause stress-- give her some time to herself with her new stall buddies and her hay with out the constant checking on her- she sounds irritated and stressed out to me.

Don't go over correcting her unless you know the cause of her negative reactions- that will make them worse if its not her being 'marish'

Has the first owners come to see her yet and see the behavior?
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    07-09-2013, 08:07 PM
  #14
Weanling
Does your friend have the skills to do some ground work with her? Not just leading here and there, but real ground work to establish herself with her on the ground. She may need some help with this with someone experienced to start if she doesn't have the skills. Trying to do this on her own without the experience and knowledge will make things worse than they are. Get some help to work through these issues.
     
    07-11-2013, 08:12 PM
  #15
Foal
My friend read through all of these and wants to thank every one. She took a lot of the advice given on here and now the mare listens much better!! There are some things that she does such as pin her ears back but she doesnt try to show dominance or invade her space. Other than that, my friend can now tack her up(much better on the crossties, she stays still and doesn't pin her ears at all. We've come to the conclusion she just is more comfortable outside her stall) and she hasn't tried to show any aggression or dominance in the past few days. Now they're beginning to develop a trusting relationship.

Thanks to everyone who replied :)
Posted via Mobile Device
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    07-15-2013, 09:12 PM
  #16
Foal
My mare (whom I had owned for 6 years at the time) was such a fussbudget when I moved her to my most recent barn a couple of years ago. As I said, I had owned and ridden her for 6 years, she had been moved several times before without problems, but this time around, she was a little jerk. I think it was related to the fact that due to personal reasons, I had not worked with her much in the months right before that move. My barn owners have always told me she is much better behaved when I come out regularly anyway.

Anyways, she eventually got over it and settled in. Had I not known her I would have been really worried because she acted up for a good two weeks. I knew my good girl was in there somewhere. I just went out and handled her every day I could. I even did some positive imagery when I was driving over to the barn. I find if I expect things to go well, they often do.

I think this mare has just had her world turned upside down and is reacting. Cannot blame her. And she will probably test the new owner. Just keep having her owner handle her consistently. If she is not safe to ride yet, just groom and take for walks. If not safe to walk yet, just groom. Baby steps, she will get there. Celebrate small improvments, not every horse reacts the same to major change. She needs time and consistency to get used to her new surroundings, and to bond with her new human.
     
    07-15-2013, 11:40 PM
  #17
Showing
My good trail gelding, a forward thinking horse, taught me that I need to be democratic in what I ask of or concede to him. When he had training issues, (he arrived with a lot of baggage) I learned to break it down into tiny requests that he could deal with. Each step would be worked in sequence until he connected all the dots. Then he was brilliant. Sometimes a little give and take is all it takes.
     
    07-16-2013, 04:22 PM
  #18
Green Broke
Quote:
Originally Posted by Blackzodiac    
She has been checked thoroughly, and I assume all health issues such as ulcers aren't an issue.
And I know, I hate to see my friend have such a hard time with her.
She asked how can she be a firm leader? She sits by her stall so that the mare can get used to her
Posted via Mobile Device
You can't assume ulcers are no9t an issue. They can come on at any time and the vet could not have checked for that in a normal exam.
     
    07-16-2013, 04:25 PM
  #19
Green Broke
Quote:
Originally Posted by Blackzodiac    
My friend read through all of these and wants to thank every one. She took a lot of the advice given on here and now the mare listens much better!! There are some things that she does such as pin her ears back but she doesnt try to show dominance or invade her space. Other than that, my friend can now tack her up(much better on the crossties, she stays still and doesn't pin her ears at all. We've come to the conclusion she just is more comfortable outside her stall) and she hasn't tried to show any aggression or dominance in the past few days. Now they're beginning to develop a trusting relationship.

Thanks to everyone who replied :)
Posted via Mobile Device
When the mare starts showing she is angry growl at her and slap her on the side if needed. If ears go back at feeding they do not get the food until ears go forward.
     
    07-16-2013, 08:20 PM
  #20
Showing
If a horse pins it's ears at me, I ramp up my energy while glaring at the horse and making it move outta my way. The look on my faces tells the horse he's going to die if he doesn't move. I never hit them. And they always move.
     

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