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Brat when tied

This is a discussion on Brat when tied within the Natural Horsemanship forums, part of the Training Horses category
  • How to build a patience pole for horses for lunging
  • My daughter when she gets tied

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    05-15-2012, 10:43 PM
  #11
Trained
What about going from a different direction with this? Horses who do this sort of thing tend to be weird about having pressure applied. What about working with her on various pressure/release exercises? Something as simple as halting her in the aisle on a lead line and taking up pressure on the line until she offers a step forward thereby releasing the tension herself? Teach her she can undo the pressure herself by simply stepping into it and not against it? Once she gets it, move onto tying her on one cross tie or that tree thing? Most horses can understand such concepts if they are explained properly to them.
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    05-15-2012, 11:13 PM
  #12
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by MyBoyPuck    
What about working with her on various pressure/release exercises? Something as simple as halting her in the aisle on a lead line and taking up pressure on the line until she offers a step forward thereby releasing the tension herself?
Don't know that that's approaching it differently, just that is one of the steps I would consider an absolute necessity before ever tying a horse.
     
    05-16-2012, 01:34 AM
  #13
Green Broke
If I understood right, you tie her up then work her? If you worked her first, she would be more likely to stand nice. Essentially her standing becomes a reward instead. It will also allow her to think about what she worked on.
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    05-16-2012, 05:35 PM
  #14
Weanling
Yeah - ok you guys are starting to head for left field.

This is a young horse being a brat - testing her boundries, and temporarily getting away with stuff - causing her to push harder in that direction. She does very much like to test people and push buttons. She is also too smart for her own good, she is arab.

While I am sure that there are other trainers out there who would do something different, this is not a complicated issue. She knows how to be tied. She has been tied before, and left alone- and was fine, she gets tied for my daughter all the time - and is fine, she just picked up a bad habit when it is me.

It won't hurt her to to spend some hours on the rail of woe. It will teach her that tied means tied, no matter what. It will teach her patience. If I had the opportunity she would spend a couple five or six hour days on he rail of woe - but I just don't have the time to sit at the stable and stare at her that long.

Periodically, my wonderful gelding forgets his manners (he does not stand still while being ground tied) and he gets to spend an hour or two on the rail of woe. (He did so last month actually)

Normal procedues for when my daughter works her is that she is groomed tied to a post in the paddock (where hair doesn't have to be cleaned up), then brought into the main barn and worked, mostly at liberty, concentrating lots of holding her feet up with a cotton rope - while at liberty. Also some lunging and starting to ground drive.

Normal procedure for when I woudl work the filly - grab both horses out of the paddock and brign into barn. My horse gets ground tied while the filly goes on half the cross tie. I fully groom my horse and saddle him up while she does "whatever". Take two or three minutes to run a brush over her main body. Mount up, dally the filly to my saddle and head on out!

My daughter does not have the same tying issues that I do with the filly. Funny that...

I forgot to mention. My daughter can lead the filly all over with a rope looped over either front pasturn. Here is where she learned that from : oops - video is no longer on youtube, how annoying. It was from a different thread about how to lay down a horse - but one of the interm steps was the guy leading the horse all over the arena by one leg.
     
    05-17-2012, 04:11 AM
  #15
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by yadlim    
Yeah - ok you guys are starting to head for left field.
Respectfully, with only part of the story & no first hand experience, with this last post giving a bit of a different story than the earlier ones, with us not knowing you & you asking opinions, that's just what you got, left field or otherwise. I perceive the story and would handle things a bit differently, but that's me.
     
    05-17-2012, 10:18 AM
  #16
Yearling
The first step to being successful with your horse is your state of mind and attitude.

I have never worked with a horse that could be called a "brat".

I have worked with horses that have behavioral issues and many of those issues were caused by the way they were handled by humans.
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    05-17-2012, 10:50 AM
  #17
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marecare    
The first step to being successful with your horse is your state of mind and attitude.

I have never worked with a horse that could be called a "brat".

I have worked with horses that have behavioral issues and many of those issues were caused by the way they were handled by humans.
You should have worked with my mare 2 years ago. And 'Brat' would have been a nice term for her.

She is now a very nice 8 year old mare who needed some time to mature as well as being put in her place.

Hang in there OP. It gets better with age! The "Rail of Woe" sounds like a fair thing for one who knows how to be tied and is being a stinker just as long as you are close and she can't hurt herself while testing your/her/Rail of Woes limits.

Maybe put a rope halter on her so it's really not fun?
     
    05-17-2012, 01:49 PM
  #18
Trained
Patience Pole - instead of rail of woe or whatever you're calling it, LOL! It's the same thing but it teaches patience and how to stand still. Doesn't sound so negative.

She's learning fine, but she's probably bored with the routine by now so I'd try to change it up. Take her out for a nice long trail ride (pony her from your gelding) so that she's tired when you tie her. Then start with grooming her from nose to tail, if you can get a hose or bucket over there, bathe her. Start getting her used to the 'post ride' clean up session. Take carrots and reward her for a 30 second quiet tie, then 1 min etc, just keep changing things up so she doesn't know what to expect.

But yes, Patience Pole works great, I train all of mine to stand tied for up to 8 hrs if that's what is needed. They get fed, watered, groomed, petted, loved on during that time but they stand tied. Stallions learn to stand quietly next to mares, mares in heat and youngsters learn to stand with the group. OH, that's another thing that might help. Take one of your horses that does tie well and tie them with her, she can learn by observation.
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    05-18-2012, 01:56 AM
  #19
Yearling
From the sounds of it when the filly is tied with your daughter she hass almost constant attention yet with you you're either focusing on the gelding or not there.

Ella had a slightly similar issue when tying she almost couldn't cope if I wasn't there. It start as weaving pawing etc.

The only thing that worked was increasing time spent away from her hiding around the corner! To begin with if she was left too long then yes the pulling rearing etc would start. Using approach and retreat strategies worked brilliantly with her. In a month she'd happily stand for 2 hours as I rode my other horse ( that's as long as I had time to wait) still haven't found a limit to her patience.

Just another option that worked for me!
     
    05-18-2012, 02:02 AM
  #20
Started
Whelp... I'd find a good sturdy post, and tie her pretty short so she can't make a wreck and leave her there all day or until she stops being a brat.
     

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