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The Essence of Natural Horsemanship??

This is a discussion on The Essence of Natural Horsemanship?? within the Natural Horsemanship forums, part of the Training Horses category

     
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        02-23-2011, 08:31 AM
      #11
    Weanling
    Im mostly looking to apply the prinicpals to my (hopefully) new horse who has some issues mainly in catching and mounting so if anyone has any good NH methods for those things :)
         
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        02-23-2011, 08:47 AM
      #12
    Weanling
    I don't know any specific "NH" methods for them, but commonsense says do something like monty roberts' "join up" (i posted something on it recently, i'll provide the link to the thread at the end of this post) and some simple desensitization for the mounting. Try lying over your horses back bareback. To do so, jump up & down a few times beside your horse, if that startles him keep doing it untill he shows signs he's relaxing into it, then stop and have a rest for a short while. Repeat the process untill he's fine with it. Then jump up & down bumping your horse's side with your body in the air, again, if it startles the horse, keep doing so untill the horse chills then stop & rest. Then jump up a few times and try land with your belly across the horses back.

    Helpp me with join up please!!!!

    For my version of join-up. Scroll down a bit when you go there & try find my post.
         
        02-23-2011, 08:50 AM
      #13
    Weanling
    Yeah that's exactly what i'd do anyway... I guess NH principals are what I use really when I think about it :/
         
        02-23-2011, 08:51 AM
      #14
    Weanling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by SarahRicoh    
    Also, this may be stupid but iv read about like in a stable you shouldnt go in and march over to the horse and put a headcollar on... you should go in and face away from the horse and wait for them to come over.. is that sorta right?
    it doesn't matter how you approach, as long as there's a quick way of easing the pressure/approach.

    Quote:
    Originally Posted by SarahRicoh    
    For example, my old pony was scared of the hosepipe so I kept on following him with it and putting the water on him until he stood still then I removed the hosepipe? Is this the right idea?
    precisely the right idea. You removed the "negative" (negative reinfocement) when the desired response was achieved.
         
        02-23-2011, 08:56 AM
      #15
    Weanling
    OKay I get it now.. Thanks Christopher you've been loads of help And I just read your posts from that link you posted and that makes total sense to me.. Il give it a go. Any other hints/tips/advice are greatly appreciated or some examples of relasing the pressure- like I gave about the hopsepipe- so I can apply it to other situations would be amazing!
         
        02-23-2011, 09:10 AM
      #16
    Weanling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by SarahRicoh    
    Yeah that's exactly what i'd do anyway... I guess NH principals are what I use really when I think about it :/
    one of my friends once said "natural horsemanship: human gets on, horse bucks, human gets off (unintentionally)"

    This friend of mine was level 3 in parelli's program of course. She's just "savvy" enough to see that 'natural' and 'unnatural' horsemanship is the opposite of black and white & regardless of whether we call it natural or not we should all be striving for the same functional horse-human relations.

    If you think of any putting pressure on your horse like you think of presenting your horse with the hosepipe then you should be gravy. Bring it all on slowly, release it all quickly, and progressively up the ante at a rate the individual horse is comfortable with.
         
        02-23-2011, 11:55 AM
      #17
    Showing
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by SarahRicoh    
    Also, this may be stupid but iv read about like in a stable you shouldnt go in and march over to the horse and put a headcollar on... you should go in and face away from the horse and wait for them to come over.. is that sorta right?
    It's better to approach the unknown horse from the side so it could see you and also wouldn't associate you with the danger. But I approach both my mares from front - just march to them and put halter on (or grab a muzzle, or kiss the nose, whatever I feel like doing) right there. Because they are very used to such handling.
         
        02-23-2011, 12:33 PM
      #18
    Started
    Christopher did a good job explaining the basic concepts of NH:

    Release pressure at the SLIGHTEST try from the horse.

    Friendly Game is the most important game: having a helpful intention toward him, a "good feel". This good feel is all-important to the horse, in his DNA, because he has to read intentions of critters in the vicinity in order to spot a predator & hopefully escape from it. Transforming ourselves from predatory behavior to helpful behavior is the human responsibility in NH.

    The good feel is not arrived at except by time & humbling effort, usually. This is why the old masters on their deathbeds said, "There is so much more that the horse has to teach me!"

    The good feel must come from the human first. Then the horse picks up on it & responds with a good feel toward the human. If this breaks down/was never there, forget it.

    I highly recommend Bill Dorrance's book, "True Horsemanship Through Feel" co-author Leslie Desmond. You can get it used in USA for less than $15 usually. It's a big book, replete with info & pics. The Dorrance brothers (Bill & Tom) are the (deceased) granddaddies of NH. They taught the present generation of NH trainers.
         
        02-23-2011, 01:20 PM
      #19
    Foal
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by SarahRicoh    
    For example, my old pony was scared of the hosepipe so I kept on following him with it and putting the water on him until he stood still then I removed the hosepipe? Is this the right idea?
    Basically, yes. If the horse is going to move away from something, you want the horse to still be facing it. For instance, you could approach the horse from the front and to the left with the hose, and have a lead on the horse, and as the horse backs away, you just calmly follow. You don't even have to spray water. Sometimes it's better to take things in stages. Let the horse get used to the hose itself, then the hose being on, then the water being on the horse. You follow until the horse stops moving, then remove the pressure, back away.

    The second method of doing this, is to have the horse follow the hose. Have someone else walk ahead while dragging the hose, and you follow after with the horse. This can help them realize that the big scary thing is actually running away from them. Don't be surprised if the horse wants to catch up to it and sniff it or chew on it after a while. :)
         
        02-23-2011, 02:44 PM
      #20
    Weanling
    People are doing a good job explaining some NH principles - for sure. I guess whether or not you buy someone's DVDs depends on how you like to learn and what you want to learn. I would say that a couple of hundred dollars is worth it. Where do you live? Are there any people that you can go watch? Usually the audit fees are nominal.

    Basically you always have to think about what your goal is and apply the pressure/release approach/retreat scenarios appropriately. Usually your horse will let you know but some horses are much harder to read than others and some horses are way more reactive then others. That's when it gets interesting.
         

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