Friendship Training does work - Page 4 - The Horse Forum

 30Likes
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
post #31 of 76 Old 01-27-2012, 08:03 PM
Foal
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: adelaide hills
Posts: 8
• Horses: 1
smrobs, is this horse paddocked with others? You mentioned you have had other 'ferel' horses. If he? Is paddocked with these other horses it may be making it harder to gain his trust. Humans have a different scent then another horse. Ultimately we are "predators" and the herd instinct is natrually to run away. You say he is approachable with treats, so he does have an element of trust - a start. You could try keeping him in a seperate paddock (or with only one other companion) and spending ALOT of time with him. Give him a reason to want human company other then another horse. Hope that makes sense
Spook is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #32 of 76 Old 01-27-2012, 08:08 PM
Super Moderator
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: Riga, Latvia
Posts: 5,590
• Horses: 1
Quote:
You could try keeping him in a seperate paddock
I'm sorry if I'm getting this wrong, but isn't this actually pressuring a horse into relationship, not letting a friendship to evolve naturally, and against his natural needs?

I have come a long way, to surrender my shadow to the shadow of my horse.
/James Wright/
Saranda is offline  
post #33 of 76 Old 01-27-2012, 08:38 PM
Trained
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: wisconsin
Posts: 5,695
• Horses: 3
very interesting, thanks for all the explainations !

Gypsy & Scout <3
Everybody is a genius. But if you judge a fish by its ability to climb a tree it will live its whole life believing that it is stupid. ~Albert Einstein
gypsygirl is offline  
post #34 of 76 Old 01-27-2012, 08:41 PM
Trained
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Australia
Posts: 8,175
• Horses: 3
I still see what you have described, to be a pressure-release system. Pressure does not need to be physical contact, just like the dominate horse in a relationship can simply give 'a' look at the submissive horse, and the submissive horse moves away. When the submissive horse moves away, the dominate horse doesn't look at him anymore.

So by standing in front of a horse, saying 'back' and waving your hands around a bit, that IS pressure. The horse is wondering what on earth you are doing and steps back. You then stop waving and give him a pat - release of pressure.
How is this, any different from any other pressure-release system?

Pressure-release does not need to be an escalation in pressure, there are many ways to skin a cat.
Some horses respond best to escalate pressure, others learn best if you ask, then back off, and ask again, like your own horse.
It is STILL pressure-release. I don't know of any single training method that does not use some form of the pressure-release system --- because this is what works for horses. They put some kind of pressure on one another, move away from the pressure, and then they are comfortable. You cannot ask a horse to do anything, without putting some degree of pressure on them. It is not possible.
Scoutrider and Fargosgirl like this.

~Horse & Hound Artistry~.

Website: www.horseandhoundartistry.com
Kayty is offline  
post #35 of 76 Old 01-27-2012, 09:28 PM Thread Starter
Foal
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Broken Hill, NSW, Australia
Posts: 65
• Horses: 0
[QUOTE=chrisnscully;1329629]Sounds to me as if FT is just positive reinforcement training - like clicker training is.]

My understanding is FT has much in common with positive reinforcement training, but that the kind of relationship it develops is different. There are a couple of people in the FT group who had used CT and positive reinforcement extensively before FT, and they tell me FT 'gets you to a different place'.

Love the story about your horse.
Cheers
F
FrancesB is offline  
post #36 of 76 Old 01-27-2012, 09:36 PM Thread Starter
Foal
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Broken Hill, NSW, Australia
Posts: 65
• Horses: 0
[QUOTE=Kayty;1329673] So by standing in front of a horse, saying 'back' and waving your hands around a bit, that IS pressure. The horse is wondering what on earth you are doing and steps back. You then stop waving and give him a pat - release of pressure.
How is this, any different from any other pressure-release system? ]

Hmmmm, I see what you mean, maybe, it could be described as very light pressure, not sure. The hand gestures are very small. Maybe it's pressure & release & positive reinforcement, as he gets the treat as well?

It is surely much much softer in approach than anything anyone local tried to show me, and much softer than the lowest levels of pressure shown to me by a local NH clinician. Some of the other horses seemed to go ok with that, but my boy didn't.
FrancesB is offline  
post #37 of 76 Old 01-27-2012, 09:39 PM
Yearling
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: North Carolina
Posts: 1,403
• Horses: 1
I don't know about friendship training, but Mudpie sure is my best friend(:

FrancesB likes this.

The hills were bathed in moonlight, the shadows not so stark;
Silver light reflected off his brown hide as he held me in the dark
– I love you, Mudpie!
mudpie is offline  
post #38 of 76 Old 01-27-2012, 09:42 PM
Showing
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Higgins, TX. YeeHaw!!
Posts: 22,112
• Horses: 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by Spook View Post
smrobs, is this horse paddocked with others? You mentioned you have had other 'ferel' horses. If he? Is paddocked with these other horses it may be making it harder to gain his trust. Humans have a different scent then another horse. Ultimately we are "predators" and the herd instinct is natrually to run away. You say he is approachable with treats, so he does have an element of trust - a start. You could try keeping him in a seperate paddock (or with only one other companion) and spending ALOT of time with him. Give him a reason to want human company other then another horse. Hope that makes sense
Yes, he is paddocked with others but they are a long way from feral LOL, I nearly have to beat them off with a stick when I go into the paddock as they all come up looking for scratches.

The funny thing about this horse...he is broke and is a very nice saddle horse. You can trust him...mostly (he's a challenging personality but an experienced rider gets along great with him), and he does his job, he just prefers to be left alone. He doesn't even like to be groomed.

We've had more success with just accepting him as he is rather than working our butts off trying for a goal that will likely never happen. When it's time to work, we go to work. When we're done, we're done. I don't do him like I do my others and spend a few minutes after a ride just scratching and petting on them. Spending more time with him just makes him grumpy and more standoffish/hard to catch LOL.

Always remember that feeling of looking at a big, open country over the ears of a good horse, seeing a new trail unwind ahead of you, and that ever-spectacular view from the top of the ridge!!! Follow my training blog: http://robertsontraining.blogspot.com/
smrobs is offline  
post #39 of 76 Old 01-27-2012, 10:02 PM
Showing
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: MD
Posts: 23,907
• Horses: 2
Quote:
Originally Posted by Spook View Post
smrobs, is this horse paddocked with others? You mentioned you have had other 'ferel' horses. If he? Is paddocked with these other horses it may be making it harder to gain his trust. Humans have a different scent then another horse. Ultimately we are "predators" and the herd instinct is natrually to run away. You say he is approachable with treats, so he does have an element of trust - a start. You could try keeping him in a seperate paddock (or with only one other companion) and spending ALOT of time with him. Give him a reason to want human company other then another horse. Hope that makes sense
Spook, my paint mare is like a horse smrobs mentioned. My parents feed her every day, give treats, and can approach most of the time, but she doesn't want to socialize with them, be groomed, and even with treats she can pass on it if she doesn't want to come close. I have her for 5.5 years already BTW. Some horses are just like that. They also have different personalities (like people).
smrobs likes this.

"Life isn't about waiting for the storm to pass: it's about learning to dance in the rain..."

"When we are no longer able to change a situation - we are challenged to change ourselves."

"How people treat you is their karma; how you react is yours."
kitten_Val is offline  
post #40 of 76 Old 01-27-2012, 10:27 PM
Showing
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Higgins, TX. YeeHaw!!
Posts: 22,112
• Horses: 24
KV, I bet she and Pokey would get along like peas and carrots . They would probably be very happy to ignore humans together.

Always remember that feeling of looking at a big, open country over the ears of a good horse, seeing a new trail unwind ahead of you, and that ever-spectacular view from the top of the ridge!!! Follow my training blog: http://robertsontraining.blogspot.com/
smrobs is offline  
Reply

Tags
training

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the The Horse Forum forums, you must first register.

Already have a Horse Forum account?
Members are allowed only one account per person at the Horse Forum, so if you've made an account here in the past you'll need to continue using that account. Please do not create a new account or you may lose access to the Horse Forum. If you need help recovering your existing account, please Contact Us. We'll be glad to help!

New to the Horse Forum?
Please choose a username you will be satisfied with using for the duration of your membership at the Horse Forum. We do not change members' usernames upon request because that would make it difficult for everyone to keep track of who is who on the forum. For that reason, please do not incorporate your horse's name into your username so that you are not stuck with a username related to a horse you may no longer have some day, or use any other username you may no longer identify with or care for in the future.



User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in









Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.


Old Thread Warning
This thread is more than 90 days old. When a thread is this old, it is often better to start a new thread rather than post to it. However, If you feel you have something of value to add to this particular thread, you can do so by checking the box below before submitting your post.

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Friendship Training ????? Spyder Horse Training 125 10-12-2011 09:02 AM
Friendship Training? taylormadechief Natural Horsemanship 4 09-08-2011 05:23 PM
Training Plans Need Work for Yearling Stoddard Horse Training 8 04-30-2011 08:46 PM
How do you work out a horse during a training session? kitten_Val Horse Training 19 06-18-2010 03:43 PM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome