going thru with threat - Page 3
 
 

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going thru with threat

This is a discussion on going thru with threat within the Natural Horsemanship forums, part of the Training Horses category

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        04-22-2013, 07:14 PM
      #21
    Green Broke
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by TBforever    
    i say good boy, but its habit lol which isnt good because I use to ask for canter, hed trot and id say good boy, amount of times I had to correct myself LOL, he is only new to ground work,the lady that was helping gave up saying he's an aggressive animal, I don't think he's aggressive, but its mainly horse play the lady that was helping who was trying to do NH on him was swinging the end of her longe line near his face which was causing him to rear up and be annoyed,

    only time I've seen him aggressive was when he charged me as I was putting his rugs on while eating he took my sleave cuff off when he went me, was very lucky he stopped after that, he never had problems with being touched while eating, which now he gets annoyed, didnt help our dog was annoying him as he retaliates to the dog, and bikes slamming acrross the road, he got a good smack to the mouth for that,

    Tis when I relised I need to be top dog not him

    barrelbeginner likes this.
         
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        04-22-2013, 07:30 PM
      #22
    Green Broke
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by TBforever    
    he got cracked over the butt yesterday with the whip, as he doesnt listen and will play up, but he was great after that, he doesnt respond to the whip at all if he knows its comming, my body language was very soft tho in that vid and wasnt comming across as if I ment it, after the owners daughter longed him, it made me more confident as he is only really threatning and once you give it to him he relises he's not boss
    If he doesn't respond to the whip, GIVE HIM a reason to respond to the whip. He's not responding because he knows you're bluffing. One good whack on that hiney of his will make him smart up real quick, believe me. He is asking the exact same thing you are right now. "Is she going to follow through with that aggression?" If he knows the answer is no, you're not going to get anywhere except getting hurt. This is not a laughing matter, stop taking it so lightly. This horse can KILL you if you don't already realize that. If his aggression is not stopped in its tracks now, it will only get worse and there will be one day where he WILL follow through.
         
        04-22-2013, 08:06 PM
      #23
    Weanling
    I aint taking it lightley, its just I see his personality and he's more so a baby in the mind, if he could he would sit in ur lap, but ask him to work and he's an idiot, he's only been off the track for a year, and the racing stable owner baby'ed him gave him anything he wanted, hence why he failed as a race horse, as he was just an idiot for the trackworkers and jockeys,

    Yup he got a good crack on the butt with the whip, yesterday he pigrooted from it but was really great afterwards

    I am glad he is good under saddle, altho after food change he is alot more lazy
    He is new to ground work, altho I havent ridden him in almost 2 months as im still paying off a saddle, as other ones don't fit him.

    I am also still learning ground work, and im finding it harder then riding
         
        04-22-2013, 08:14 PM
      #24
    Yearling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by TBforever    
    i aint taking it lightley, its just I see his personality and he's more so a baby in the mind, if he could he would sit in ur lap, but ask him to work and he's an idiot, he's only been off the track for a year, and the racing stable owner baby'ed him gave him anything he wanted, hence why he failed as a race horse, as he was just an idiot for the trackworkers and jockeys,

    Yup he got a good crack on the butt with the whip, yesterday he pigrooted from it but was really great afterwards

    I am glad he is good under saddle, altho after food change he is alot more lazy
    He is new to ground work, altho I havent ridden him in almost 2 months as im still paying off a saddle, as other ones don't fit him.

    I am also still learning ground work, and im finding it harder then riding


    Horses are not puppies, and should definitely not be treated as such. As stated, if you do not start following through he very well may seriously injure or even kill you.

    Don't look at his personality and say "aww he's so cute he can get away with going into my personal space, maybe even nipping will be okay today"
    Horses are not stupid, they remember things. You need to be firm with him, don't let him get away with the slightest. My horse is cute, but you best believe if he even attempts to show disrespect he gets a nice long lesson in respect that very moment, not two days later.
    franknbeans and smrobs like this.
         
        04-22-2013, 08:19 PM
      #25
    Weanling
    Yeah, im learning that, I also now know its body language, as when he did nip in the girth area I smacked him in mouth, and he came back for more 2 more times, so now when he does it I smack in mouth and shout miover and make sure my body language shows it, and he stops,
         
        04-23-2013, 12:58 AM
      #26
    Green Broke
    TBforever, I won't get into correcting you because you've received many good tips already and you are getting someone to help you.

    Usually with most horses, its not if but when they will act instead of threaten or warn. Very few will not follow through. We have one of each. Harley definitely kicks with intention. Lucy on the other hand is all bark and no bite. She'll stomp her hoof but never close at all.

    Anebel, you are only the second person I've ever heard that want the horse to stop with its side to you. Not saying you're wrong because everyone has their own way. However, I prefer for the horse to turn towards me and give me both eyes of attention. If I may ask, why do you not want the horse to face you?

    Working a horse on grass is not wrong because you're working it on its food. Yes, the horse can be distracted by wanting to eat. That is only if you let it. If the horse loses its focus on you, put it back to work or work harder. It makes them focus on you. If you let them lose focus, of course they'll try to eat.
    Posted via Mobile Device
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        04-23-2013, 01:17 AM
      #27
    Trained
    If the horse bolts, they are facing towards you, and it is an invasion of space into my circle.
    As well for a horse with sidereins on you want them to stop and stand and wait for you to adjust them.

    It is the way of lunging taught by all the classic lunging and ground work books. And has been taught to me by various trainers including an Olympian. It is the classic way to lunge because it is tried, true and safe.
    Having the horse turn towards you is dangerous should they bolt, does not allow you to keep control of how quickly you are bringing the line in (and both together means the horse being tangled in the line). And it allows the horse to show disrespect by invading your circle. I always like to be approaching a stationary, calm horse.

    But I guess with horses less high strung than a TB or less hot and strong willed than a WB it doesn't really matter... I'm used to dealing with horses who will bolt, buck and kick out without much warning or reason. And this is the safest way.
    Posted via Mobile Device
    Fahntasia and albertaeventer like this.
         
        04-23-2013, 01:51 AM
      #28
    Green Broke
    Double post. Stupid smartphone 😠
         
        04-23-2013, 01:56 AM
      #29
    Green Broke
    I can understand for ground driving but I've never had a horse bolt into the center. They've always bolted to the side or away. And yes, I have worked with some very high spirited or high strung horses. Arabs can be that way too. They can be very bull headed too or strong willed.

    Again not saying you're wrong, to each their own. I just prefer to have their head closer than their butt. It takes longer to turn a half circle than a quarter circle if they decide to kick out at you. Just saying.
    Posted via Mobile Device
    franknbeans likes this.
         
        04-23-2013, 03:31 AM
      #30
    Foal
    Tbforever, there is a lot of well meaning, good traditionl and respected advice in this post- however none of it has anything to do with natural horsemanship. Though this is posted in the NH section of the forum....
    If you want to learn that way of doing things its probably best to get an instructor out to see you , get some good groundwork skills . You could try joining Parelli connect, it is free for 30 days. See if you liked that way, or try Quantum Savvy, Cynthia Royal, Caroline Resnick.
    There are lots of natural horsemanship methods its a case of finding one that suits you.
    Sorry I am unable to post any links to any further information as links always get removed.

    Claire
         

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