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Ground work saved a LIFE today! Long, sorry!

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        08-22-2009, 08:47 PM
      #11
    Yearling
    The frightening thing is, I DID have a knife - I ALWAYS have a knife. It was easier to lay her down. The guy just knew the horse would do it. My 1st reaction was to cut the latigo, too. I worked on a working ranch for a little while and learned the importance of having one on me ALL the time. Plus, my husband is a silversmith and made me an engraved one for our anniversary, so I am attatched to it for a few reasons.
    Yes, this filly is special. She can SLIDE to, like crazy. I've never seen one smarter.
    Trainer/friend is a true blue cowboy, so I'm sure he'll be at it again soon. Thanks for all of the well wishes for him!
         
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        08-22-2009, 08:49 PM
      #12
    Banned
    I don't know what you mean by ground work but I do absolutely no lunging, don't own a lung line and just get on a horse almost the same day I get him home and I will put my guys against anyones to hold in an emergency..
    Example.. I trim trees by breaking branches from the saddle. I grabbed a branch laying across the train and tried dragging it off the trail. It was stuck on one end and I was sidepassing the horse to pull the branch out when the saddle totally slipped around and I was dumped and the saddle was hanging under the horse and I was laying on the ground looking up. He never moved a muscle.
    A person was caught in a dangerous crossing between a cliff and a train and the horse exploded having only about a 10 foot shelf between the speeding train and dropping off the ledge. I was not riding with this person but seeing a disaster in the making I ran my horse between the train and the rearing horse. AGain my guy never flinched even though he was within 5 feet of the flying train and I quickly moved in on the rearing horse, grasp the bridle and using my horse as a buffer the horse let me hold him until the train passed.
    Again I do no ground work and will put my guys against anyone elses in an emergency. They will hold no matter what.
         
        08-22-2009, 08:57 PM
      #13
    Yearling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by kevinshorses    
    It's great that the trainer had put the time in to be able to stop the horse and for you to lay her down. That being said, every single person that is around horses should have at least one sharp knife in thier pocket. In this particular case laying her down helped free him but what if she was already laying on top of him and you had to cut the latigo to get the saddle off and get her off him.
    I was at a roping once and a kid let his horse get tangled in the rope and the horse went down. The kid fell over the front of the horse and the stap on his chaps hooked on the saddle horn. When the horse got up the kid was hanging upside down. About ten guys jumped over the fence and most of them had a knife in thier hand. Lucky for the kid his horse stood still and they lifted him up and unhooked him but any one of those men would have cut the strap without a hesitation. Had I been watching that wreck your trainer would be shopping for a new set of spur straps. I'm glad to hear everything came out so well and it sounds like you have a great trainer at your barn.
    It is so, so important to have a knife - and I did! I grew up sailing as well as riding, both of which make having a knife on you mandatory! I've had my A$$ saved sailing more than once because I had a knife, and I never forgot. Plus, my hubby is a silversmith and he made me a super cool engraved one for our anniversary! If the little filly hadn't laid down, my next move was to cut the latigo or hack at the blanket. I was wondering how long it would take me to do it as I was figuring out how to lay her down! Those things are so thick!
    Thanks for the well-wishes for my friend. I'll pass them along. He's a true cowboy, so I'm sure he'll be cuttin again in no time!
    I'm so sorry too, to hear that so many of you have had similar experiences. I know it is something I'll NEVER forget. It was just awfull.
    I truely thought I was watching my mentor bite the big one.
         
        08-22-2009, 09:33 PM
      #14
    Yearling
    RiosDad - I think it's great that your horses are so reliable.

    We don't own lunge lines either. We have around pen, though. We work in it not to tire, but to communicate and form an understanding with our horses. The foundation for "whoa" is formed there, as is respect of space latteral flexion, roll-back etc. Lots of guys use them. It's just the way I was taught. That's what we mean by ground work. It's just a way of aproaching training that some folks prefer.
         
        08-22-2009, 09:35 PM
      #15
    Yearling
    Sorry about the kinda double post - my computer kinda had a "moment" it told me it hadn't completed the post!
         
        08-22-2009, 10:10 PM
      #16
    Trained
    What a great story.

    Makes me feel like I don't do enough ground work with my horses. And I *am* going to add a knife to my riding tools. I always have my cell, but a folding knife could indeed be a life-saver.
         
        08-22-2009, 11:01 PM
      #17
    Trained
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Qtswede    
    Thanks for the great post - just goes to show ground work is EVERYTHING. Without it there is no foundation, and a house with no foundation is not stable. Great GREAT story. Hope your friend recovers quickly.
    Ditto I was taught from a young age that groundwork and building a trusting relationship with my horse was absolutely essential; and every horse I have owned or spent a considerable amount of time training has done anything with little asking.

    As far as the 'scarey' part of this story, that is way I wear spurs that have blunt ends (no rowels) and I never put a spur strap on...I've never had anything like that happen, but I have heard of things like this happening, so my personal preference IF I have to use a spur, is no rowel, and no strap...I also witnessed a person at a show get their foot caught in the stirrup, because the spur itself got caught, where otherwise they might have gotten loose. Just goes to show you never know!

    I have kept a knife in my pocket ever since we had a truck\trailer accident years ago, and my dad had to ask a bunch of bystanders if they had one, because my QH was stuck underneath my mom's arab, and couldn't get up because the halter held him there (on his side). This was also a testement to my horses trust in me, because when I went to the back of the trailer, they were both trying to move, and all I said was 'whoa, easy' and they both stopped. I climbed in, and slipped a lead around my boy's neck, while my dad cut him free. That horse waited until I asked him, to get up. If a horse could have been frantic beyond obedience that would have been the time, but both those horses trusted me to get them out of their predicament and waited to move until I told them it was okay to.
         
        08-23-2009, 12:29 AM
      #18
    Trained
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by RiosDad    
    I don't know what you mean by ground work but I do absolutely no lunging, don't own a lung line and just get on a horse almost the same day I get him home and I will put my guys against anyones to hold in an emergency..
    Example.. I trim trees by breaking branches from the saddle. I grabbed a branch laying across the train and tried dragging it off the trail. It was stuck on one end and I was sidepassing the horse to pull the branch out when the saddle totally slipped around and I was dumped and the saddle was hanging under the horse and I was laying on the ground looking up. He never moved a muscle.
    A person was caught in a dangerous crossing between a cliff and a train and the horse exploded having only about a 10 foot shelf between the speeding train and dropping off the ledge. I was not riding with this person but seeing a disaster in the making I ran my horse between the train and the rearing horse. AGain my guy never flinched even though he was within 5 feet of the flying train and I quickly moved in on the rearing horse, grasp the bridle and using my horse as a buffer the horse let me hold him until the train passed.
    Again I do no ground work and will put my guys against anyone elses in an emergency. They will hold no matter what.
    Wow! I'll bet you can speak French in Russian too can't you. I don't know if I have ever heard someone so ignorant and proud of it.
    franknbeans likes this.
         
        08-23-2009, 12:37 PM
      #19
    Yearling
    Hahaha! French in Russian....I love that guy. I've never tried the beer, though.
    But seriously, it's essential to have a knife handy. We keep a kit in each vehicle that has one in addition to a pile of other stuff.
    ***update***
    Trainer is feeling pretty good. He's on crutches for the time being, but I'm sure that will not last long. He's already complaining. Filly is fine and worked great today! Nervous in the spot where all the drama unfolded, but sound and happy. She works cattle all next week - should be fun!
         
        08-23-2009, 01:41 PM
      #20
    Trained
    Dear KevinsHorses: *APPLAUD*

    Great story. Glad everyone is okay and sounds like you've got a good filly on your hands.
         

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