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Handling Situation When Horses Strike

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  • When horses strike
  • Gelding handling

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    08-29-2013, 12:05 PM
  #1
Weanling
Handling Situation When Horses Strike

I need some feedback on this situation. I was hand grazing my horse when another gelding came into our pasture. The other person was going to release her horse and I asked her not to, as these horses had not been pasture mates before. So, in hand, we introduced the two geldings.

After a moment, the other gelding squealed and in a flash, struck out at my horse, and then me. I was not expecting this, and did notice my gelding didn't seem phazed. Luckily he missed me by a foot where I has holding the lead rope. The other owner did nothing to correct her horse. I wasn't too impressed by her behaviour and doubt that our horses will ever be in the same pasture again.

That wasn't my horse that misbehaved, so I could do nothing. Or could I?
     
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    08-29-2013, 12:14 PM
  #2
Super Moderator
You could not. Nothing will make an enemy faster in the horse world than someone who "disciplines" another person's horse. You can defend yourself, but you can't discipline ohter people's horses after the fact. I mean, you can, but it if you have to live with these people you are better off to suck it up and say nothing.
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    08-29-2013, 12:30 PM
  #3
Showing
I wouldn't have done anything to the horse, but I would have immediately chewed the owner up one side and down the other.
     
    08-29-2013, 01:27 PM
  #4
Foal
I would say you did the right thing from the get-go by asking the other person not to let the horse off of it's lead. That being said, I would have definitely said something to the other owner about how they handled the situation. I also try and ask other owners how their horses are with new horses before interacting.
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    08-29-2013, 02:30 PM
  #5
Green Broke
The striking and squealing is pretty normal when horses meet each other. Personally, I tend to expect it so I would have chased the other horse off if he approached so that I wouldn't be in the middle of hooves. It's also why I don't introduce horses in hand. It doesn't mean that they will maul each other but its definitely not a human friendly situation.

Her horse, IMO, didn't really do anything abonormal or unnatural. I don't think he did anything "wrong" per se. I absolutely would have chased him off or left the pasture when I saw the other person ignoring me. I would have given her a talking to after.
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    08-29-2013, 04:51 PM
  #6
Green Broke
^^^^ I agree. Meeting for the first time in hand in that situation is asking for a problem.
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    08-29-2013, 05:21 PM
  #7
Green Broke
I would say that's a pretty typical reaction.

I wouldn't do anything to correct the horse or the owner. The first isn't acceptable, and the second doesn't tend to be /socially/ acceptable. Sure, she should have corrected her own horse, but it's not your place to do so.

I would just try to avoid a similar situation in the future.
     
    08-29-2013, 05:50 PM
  #8
Green Broke
Quote:
Originally Posted by tinyliny    
you could not. Nothing will make an enemy faster in the horse world than someone who "disciplines" another person's horse. You can defend yourself, but you can't discipline ohter people's horses after the fact. I mean, you can, but it if you have to live with these people you are better off to suck it up and say nothing.
I totally disagree. If I had been there with a whip that horse would have whip marks on him. GRRRRR
Please don't suggest that a human, who is 8x-10x smaller in size and weight should NOT defend himself or herself.
Too many people keep animals that are out of control. It isn't cute and it isn't funny. It is HIGHLY DANGEROUS! Better that the OP reacted immediately and the horse was hit in self defense that the human was injured and the owner sued. Think about it.
After the fact, you can't do much.
I would tt the barn owner about this. I would also tt the owner, when the horses aren't around about it, but I doubt that would change anything. UNfortunately, you're probably stuck with keeping a distance between the owner and you AND the owner's horse and your horse.
Horses don't normally strike at each other.
It is a VERY AGGRESSIVE behavior.

Biting and kicking while in the pasture is pretty normal.
     
    08-29-2013, 07:04 PM
  #9
Super Moderator
Quote:
Originally Posted by Corporal    
I totally disagree. If I had been there with a whip that horse would have whip marks on him. GRRRRR
Please don't suggest that a human, who is 8x-10x smaller in size and weight should NOT defend himself or herself.
Too many people keep animals that are out of control. It isn't cute and it isn't funny. It is HIGHLY DANGEROUS! Better that the OP reacted immediately and the horse was hit in self defense that the human was injured and the owner sued. Think about it.
After the fact, you can't do much.
I would tt the barn owner about this. I would also tt the owner, when the horses aren't around about it, but I doubt that would change anything. UNfortunately, you're probably stuck with keeping a distance between the owner and you AND the owner's horse and your horse.
Horses don't normally strike at each other.
It is a VERY AGGRESSIVE behavior.

Biting and kicking while in the pasture is pretty normal.
Corporal,
I did not suggest the person not defend themselves. But, this already happened. She asked if she should have done something after the action that happened, such as say something or discipline the hrose herself, since the owner apparently will not.
While it would make me very angry to have someone else's horse strike at me and them do NOTHING, say NOTHING, if I took a whip and started into smacking on their horse, I would make any future interactions with them likely impossible. Yes, THEY should discipline their horse, or at the very least, apologize. But if you take matters into your own hands and decide you have the right to do this, then be prepared to have very bad interpersonal relations with someone , who you might share the barn with . Can make being at the barn really ugly.

It's possible the person is clueless and rather than you leaping on their horse with a whip, you might risk some advice, but my experience is that advice given when not asked for is rarely heeded or appreciated and usually comes back to bite you in the butt.

Better to pointedly avoid this person, IMO.
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    08-29-2013, 11:42 PM
  #10
Weanling
Thanks for all your input, I appreciate all views. I did advise the BO as she is also the manager, as she needed to know. I was disappointed in the other owner, but she is basically an ineffective handler. While she might realize she should have corrected him, her methods are inconsistent and don't show leadership. I should have known better! I'm just glad we had enough space in between the animals.
     

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