Has anyone ever heard of this guy?? - Page 2 - The Horse Forum
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post #11 of 24 Old 11-09-2009, 05:53 PM
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Originally Posted by Alberta Girl View Post
Buck Brannaman, one of the best there is. And does vaquero style. Here is a link of him riding. Everyone can learn so much by watching him ride, over and over again.
Buck is as real as they come. If you want a good read pick up The Faraway Horses. It's about his life and how he got where he's at.

There's nothing like the Rockies in the springtime... Nothing like the freedom in the air... And there ain't nothing better than draggin calves to the fire and there's nothing like the smell of burning hair. -Brenn Hill
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post #12 of 24 Old 11-10-2009, 12:45 PM
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Yes, and his other book is Believe. I am attending his clinic here in Alberta this weekend and looking very forward to it. Always lots to learn.

To the OP, I would suggest if you can get to one of Buck's clinics, definately go. Especially since you are relatively new to horses, you are in a great position to learn good horsemanship right from the start. You would not be disappointed. And take notes as you will learn so much that you will need to take it home and soak on it. It is easier on you and your horse to learn than to have to un-learn down the road.

Best of luck to you.
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post #13 of 24 Old 11-10-2009, 01:29 PM
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Originally Posted by ridergirl23 View Post
that is where i first saw jonathen feild! we were watching the clinics at the mane event and we decided to here what he had to say. i like his sense of humor too, haha i bought a few of his dvd's and they really work on my horses

Okay ridergirl, who are you....... LOL I'm in Langley BC.
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post #14 of 24 Old 11-10-2009, 01:45 PM
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Originally Posted by kevinshorses View Post
I think you posted a clip of him on here and after that I saw more on youtube. One that I really enjoyed was when he was riding a gray horse and had a long pole that he was turning around . I'll try to find it and post it here.

Found it!

YouTube- Jonathan Field and Quincy's Story
Quincy has an incredible story. He was given to Jonathan because no one could get near him. It took Jonathan weeks to even get close to him. He finally turned him out in a field for about 6 months and then tried again. Quincy is a very "sceptical" horse, it has taken 3 or 4 years to get him to this point. While being sceptical he's also a horse that needs a job. Jonathan started doing the pole dance with him a year or so ago because some of the other training methods weren't working for the horse.
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post #15 of 24 Old 11-10-2009, 03:02 PM
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Bridleman, I have personally never heard of this particular trainer, but do see the importance of it. When many people get a horse, or just get on a horse, they are doing it for themselves. I admit, when I got my first horse, I got it for me also. Now, it is not at all uncommon for me to call my husband and say "I think I'm going to bring this one home, I think we can help it". When I get on a horse, my question isn't "what do you know" or "where can you take me", its "what can I do to help you". There is a lot that the rider can teach the horse beyond obedience. To do this, it does require the rider to also be an athlete, something that is often overlooked. Core balance and core strength are essential in this.

Horses are masters of disguise, and they can manipulate their bodies in amazing ways to manage to make themselves "obedient", or simply just to "give to pressure". To be able to recognize the slightest imbalance in the horse or the rider is a skill that takes a lot of practice and a good teacher.

One horse that I'm currently riding has been on and off lame for years. This horse is notoriously hard to handle, tends to bite, pins ears constantly, even chomps his teeth. In 5 rides, his personality has changed for the better, he is easier to ride, more willing to work, he has stopped stocking up in his stall, and he is traveling better overall. I did not achieve any of this through games or respect training, I simply rode him and made his body feel better. When that felt better, the defensive behaviors melt away. Now, I would have done some different things with this horse if I could have, but he is not mine and I had to work with my instructions from the owner.... ride him.
I definately encourage you not only to look into the physical responsibilities of the rider, but also correct biomechanical function of the horse and understanding herd dynamics. I personally stay away from many NH techniques, as I have found a common set of physical issues with horses that have been trained with these methods.

Good luck with whatever you decide to do.
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post #16 of 24 Old 11-10-2009, 11:05 PM Thread Starter
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Flitterbug: What kind of issues have you found with the NH training and who would you classify as NH?? It's hard sometimes to decide what is the best approach to horses, I know that Buck is highly recommended and as soon as I get a chance I hope to ride in one of his clinics. I am just curious about this particular guy being his look at these ideas and that he is close to where I live I would just prefer to stay away from the "cookie cutter clincians" if I can.

Thanks for all your thoughts
>BM
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post #17 of 24 Old 11-12-2009, 03:14 PM
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Yes, to start off, I will be the first to say that I do use many training techniques that would be classified "NH", however, I find that many NH trainers over-emphasize their reliance on some of these techniques. All of my horses need to know how to give to pressure, but I personally believe that there is such thing as a horse that is too light to pressure.

For example "give to the bit", I do not want a horse to brace against the bit and hang on my hands, but I also do not one so soft that they drop their head away from the slightest pressure. Why? When the horse drops the chin directly to the neck, they are "arching", but they are not lifting the back, lifting through c6 and c7, and stretching the cervical vertebrae. They still end up pulling largely through the lower muscles in their neck as they have never actually learned to engage the hind end, use their abdominals, and lift the back.
Next, disengaging the hind end..... Yes, all horses do need to know how to do it, but rotating the hip joint without proper flexion can be damaging. The axial rotation in the hip joint is limited. I have seen a very common posture with horses that are asked to do this repetitively, something that many NH trainers encourage. Working with horses with this, actually teaching them to truly "engage" is pretty challenging. When the hind end isn't working properly, it transfers through the rest of the body. I have seen many with joint issues, back issues, etc.

I have also seen many of these horses achieve obedience at the expense of their bodies, learning how to give to pressure despite the obvious conflict with the correct function of their body.

Again, I do think that these techniques are necessary for horses to learn, granted that they aren't overdone. Overdoing anything is harmful, but I find that many people find comfort in these exercises because they are easily accomplished. I am personally not a huge fan of any particular clinician, I have never actually managed to watch a whole show or DVD. I would actually lean towards Buck, Hunt, or Dorrance to actually learn the techniques. I would then start working more with the body, always keeping the mind in check, but spending more time on physical correctness. Too much obedience in a horse can hinder that horse's ability to really let you know when something isn't working right. I work through the relationship for honesty, respect, and a mutual understanding, not only that "if I do this, and you do that, I will release pressure", but working as the horses personal trainer, working through the mind and the body to read where any imbalance is occuring.
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post #18 of 24 Old 11-13-2009, 03:15 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by FlitterBug View Post
Yes, to start off, I will be the first to say that I do use many training techniques that would be classified "NH", however, I find that many NH trainers over-emphasize their reliance on some of these techniques. All of my horses need to know how to give to pressure, but I personally believe that there is such thing as a horse that is too light to pressure.

For example "give to the bit", I do not want a horse to brace against the bit and hang on my hands, but I also do not one so soft that they drop their head away from the slightest pressure. Why? When the horse drops the chin directly to the neck, they are "arching", but they are not lifting the back, lifting through c6 and c7, and stretching the cervical vertebrae. They still end up pulling largely through the lower muscles in their neck as they have never actually learned to engage the hind end, use their abdominals, and lift the back.
Next, disengaging the hind end..... Yes, all horses do need to know how to do it, but rotating the hip joint without proper flexion can be damaging. The axial rotation in the hip joint is limited. I have seen a very common posture with horses that are asked to do this repetitively, something that many NH trainers encourage. Working with horses with this, actually teaching them to truly "engage" is pretty challenging. When the hind end isn't working properly, it transfers through the rest of the body. I have seen many with joint issues, back issues, etc.

I have also seen many of these horses achieve obedience at the expense of their bodies, learning how to give to pressure despite the obvious conflict with the correct function of their body.

Again, I do think that these techniques are necessary for horses to learn, granted that they aren't overdone. Overdoing anything is harmful, but I find that many people find comfort in these exercises because they are easily accomplished. I am personally not a huge fan of any particular clinician, I have never actually managed to watch a whole show or DVD. I would actually lean towards Buck, Hunt, or Dorrance to actually learn the techniques. I would then start working more with the body, always keeping the mind in check, but spending more time on physical correctness. Too much obedience in a horse can hinder that horse's ability to really let you know when something isn't working right. I work through the relationship for honesty, respect, and a mutual understanding, not only that "if I do this, and you do that, I will release pressure", but working as the horses personal trainer, working through the mind and the body to read where any imbalance is occuring.

Wow, I know that this is coming from a green person and might not mean squat, but that was very well put and also very informative.

Thank you

>BH
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post #19 of 24 Old 11-15-2009, 01:48 PM
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FlitterBug, I SO AGREE with you!
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post #20 of 24 Old 11-15-2009, 07:58 PM
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Your welcome. Whatever program you decide to go with, just remember that the mind, horses body, and persons body all work together. The body has a correct function which will promote overall health, comfort, and stability of the horse. Good luck with whatever you decide to go with.

Last edited by FlitterBug; 11-15-2009 at 08:05 PM.
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