horse lingo help
 
 

       The Horse Forum > Training Horses > Natural Horsemanship

horse lingo help

This is a discussion on horse lingo help within the Natural Horsemanship forums, part of the Training Horses category
  • Common horse lingo
  • Working with extremely stubborn horses forums

 
LinkBack Thread Tools
    09-14-2009, 10:03 PM
  #1
Yearling
horse lingo help

I am currently trying my hand for the first time at working with a very stubborn horse. I'm not subscribing to any one particular method so far but I don't like smacking, shouting, whipping, etc. I know I need to be consistant so I chose one method (Clinton Anderson) and have been sticking with it just because that is what I have access to and like I said I want to stay consistent.

So the main problem is, having not grown up around horses and not been around many trainers before I don't always know what people mean. For example, I think my horse falls into the left brain introvert category (parelli) but I don't know how to judge personalities yet. How do I know if he's playful- how do I play with a horse? How do I know if he is bored or just resistant? What I do know: he is very stubborn. Shuts down when pushed, has very little respect for people on the ground, only wants what he wants. He seems to be a very smart boy, but that too could be my biased opinion. Oh and he is extremely food motivated. Any help or tips are greatly appreciated. Please don't recommend I watch Parelli videos. I can't afford them and have no other access to them other than buying.

I guess my question here is; how do I keep him from being bored and how do I motivate him? I keep reading that I need to out think him and try reverse psychology. How do you do this if you can't get inside his head to begin with??
     
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
    09-14-2009, 10:08 PM
  #2
Trained
I can't help with the brain personality thing, but I would actually recommend trying a blend of various trainers. Stay consistent with your horse, yes, but explore methods.
     
    09-15-2009, 09:08 AM
  #3
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by tealamutt    
I am currently trying my hand for the first time at working with a very stubborn horse. I'm not subscribing to any one particular method so far but I don't like smacking, shouting, whipping, etc. I know I need to be consistant so I chose one method (Clinton Anderson) and have been sticking with it just because that is what I have access to and like I said I want to stay consistent.

So the main problem is, having not grown up around horses and not been around many trainers before I don't always know what people mean. For example, I think my horse falls into the left brain introvert category (parelli) but I don't know how to judge personalities yet. How do I know if he's playful- how do I play with a horse? How do I know if he is bored or just resistant? What I do know: he is very stubborn. Shuts down when pushed, has very little respect for people on the ground, only wants what he wants. He seems to be a very smart boy, but that too could be my biased opinion. Oh and he is extremely food motivated. Any help or tips are greatly appreciated. Please don't recommend I watch Parelli videos. I can't afford them and have no other access to them other than buying.

I guess my question here is; how do I keep him from being bored and how do I motivate him? I keep reading that I need to out think him and try reverse psychology. How do you do this if you can't get inside his head to begin with??
yea.. what she said...our horses are clones it seems and I have the exact same questions. Finding info for dealing with LBI horses is incredibly difficult! These guys don't respond to mainstream methods which can be nerve racking to relatively new owners. Any tips on ways to out think em???
     
    09-15-2009, 09:52 AM
  #4
Green Broke
I don't really recommend Parelli. A lot of people have had success with him, but unless you really want to get into all that scene and spend all that money. I'm not saying Parelli doesn't necessarily work - but I think its very much sold out.

I think the best way to deal with horses is to use common sense. I wouldn't really buy into "left brain" and "right brain" type thing, but be open to things. I've heard mixed reviews about Clinton Anderson, so approach him with caution, use your common sense.

If your horse does do something bad that you don't like, don't just stop because you think its too much. Stopping something because you don't like his reaction will just enforce it.

Things that would bore a horse are repetitive things. I don't like lunging with ropes - how much would you like running around in circles? You can do things like yielding to pressure on the ground, but don't push it. Do it a little, expect a little, then you get a result maybe a few times, then you move onto something else. Don't spend an hour on one thing - your horse is bound to get bored.

Most times a stubborn horse isn't stubborn so much, as he doesn't understand. Even though you may seem to be very clear in your commands you really have to show a horse what to do and keep at it until he gets it. Letting him getting away with something is actually training him to do something.

It works through pressure and relief. Use pressure and then relieve it when he does what is required

The internet is full of valuable sites, I find its best not to get too involved in one set belief, but one way doesn't work with all horses and getting too involved means you often cannot see outside it all.

Good luck. Get to know your horse, only you can judge him.
     
    09-15-2009, 10:43 AM
  #5
Foal
I've been doing all that.. and I don't subscribe much to Parelli either, but I must say his little horsenality chart nailed my horse perfectly. So this is the scenario regarding pressure and release: Apply a little bit of pressure (asking)... Milo just kind of looks at me slowly as if to say "uh.. no thanks" and goes back to his business. I apply a little more pressure (telling)... Milo says "Really, I'm not interested.. go away". I step up the pressure a bit more (forcing the issue) and he in no uncertain terms tells me to get the h#ll away from him in no uncertain terms. I like CA but I swear....those horses want to please and are willing to work.. the type of horse we are talking about shuts down to humans when asked to do something and gets nasty when asked with authority. We are effectively tuned out and when we try to clear the channel to get better reception we are confronted with one ticked off horse. So... We know that out thinking and keeping things interesting are important... any ideas on how to keep it interesting?
     
    09-15-2009, 03:14 PM
  #6
Trained
I'se seen CA work on horses that were definitely not willing to please. Your problem is your quiting to soon. Keep working on him and quit pestering him. Ask, Tell, then Demand. Don't stop till he moves his feet. These clinicians have seen hundreds if not thousands of horses so they know how to work each one that's why it looks so easy. You won't be as good at it but you need to stick with it. It WILL work if you keep it up.
     
    09-15-2009, 03:17 PM
  #7
Trained
The right brain/left brain thing is a defunct theory in human physcology and I'm pretty sure it doesn't hold any more water in horses either.
     
    09-15-2009, 03:30 PM
  #8
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by kevinshorses    
I'se seen CA work on horses that were definitely not willing to please. Your problem is your quiting to soon. Keep working on him and quit pestering him. Ask, Tell, then Demand. Don't stop till he moves his feet. These clinicians have seen hundreds if not thousands of horses so they know how to work each one that's why it looks so easy. You won't be as good at it but you need to stick with it. It WILL work if you keep it up.
I suddenly feel like a pansy... ty for the swift kick in the pants... :)
     
    09-15-2009, 08:48 PM
  #9
Yearling
So kevinshorses I've seen a lot of your posts and like a lot of the things you have to say. Here is one specific problem I face; he runs me over. YES I know it means he has no respect, but I am trying hard to work on it but don't really totally know how. I can get his feet moving but overall it seems to do little good.

Here is a typical scenario: I try to put him in the crossties (not actually hooking him up just asking him to stand) and he barrels right on top of me to get out so I make him back (him fighting the whole way sometimes nearly dragging me) and stand where I put him the first time. Then he barrels forward again, this time with a bite (SMACK). We repeat, I back him up put him where he was, release pressure as soon as he stands still and then forward again we go. It goes on forever. It seems like I'm making no progress at all. If I'm outside leading him (which is the one area we have really moved forward in- he now leads pretty well), and stop to talk with someone he'll hold still for maybe 10 seconds then barrel forward. I back him to where he was, forward again. Back him again and this time he lunges forward with more determination. I have had this go on for an hour or more, each time he seems to shut down more and more, working his mouth and getting pissed and either less responsive or downright dangerously pushy. I don't know- I mean an hour... am I giving up too soon? I don't want to stop asking until he at least tries to do what I ask but it seems like working too long at the same thing is not good either. What the H am I doing wrong (I am sure it's me). I always make sure it ends with him at least standing for 10 seconds and we only go forward when I decide. I have never let a session end because he wore me out, but have wanted to. Please help me!!

Ps I have NO clue what "out thinking" him is. And for the love of God don't use the words "common sense". I was not raised around horses and clearly don't fully understand them. Spell it out like I'm a child from mars!

Thank you. Can you feel my desperation?
     
    09-15-2009, 08:50 PM
  #10
Yearling
Ps I taught my friend's mare to ground tie in a matter of a couple of days. I can teach her all kinds of things. I know how to do somethings right but when it comes to a dominant strong willed horse I need help. And I am working with a trainer too.
     

Quick Reply
Please help keep the Horse Forum enjoyable by reporting rude posts.
Message:
Options

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the The Horse Forum forums, you must first register.

Already have a Horse Forum account?
Members are allowed only one account per person at the Horse Forum, so if you've made an account here in the past you'll need to continue using that account. Please do not create a new account or you may lose access to the Horse Forum. If you need help recovering your existing account, please Contact Us. We'll be glad to help!

New to the Horse Forum?
Please choose a username you will be satisfied with using for the duration of your membership at the Horse Forum. We do not change members' usernames upon request because that would make it difficult for everyone to keep track of who is who on the forum. For that reason, please do not incorporate your horse's name into your username so that you are not stuck with a username related to a horse you may no longer have some day, or use any other username you may no longer identify with or care for in the future.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.


Old Thread Warning
This thread is more than 90 days old. When a thread is this old, it is often better to start a new thread rather than post to it. However, If you feel you have something of value to add to this particular thread, you can do so by checking the box below before submitting your post.

Thread Tools

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Horse Lingo Question Sunkissed28f Horse Talk 13 04-09-2008 07:54 AM



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 03:22 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0