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horse lingo help

This is a discussion on horse lingo help within the Natural Horsemanship forums, part of the Training Horses category

     
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        09-15-2009, 09:04 PM
      #11
    Foal
    My horse used to be a total jerk. He would kick me, bite me, shove me around when walking. All that lovely disrespectful stuff.

    With my horse, I had a LOT of luck with roundpen work. I would just put him in there and make his fanny run. I feel like 1)it got the giggles out and 2) I got his attention, by me chasing his with a rope (i didn't use a whip). I eventually got his respect, he would follow me around the round pen, change directions, etc. for us it was a great tool. And I used it for other things down the road too, heck I can swing ropes, and bounce balls off him now!
         
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        09-15-2009, 10:08 PM
      #12
    Started
    The Parelli Horsenality chart is VERY accurate and is brilliant. Everyone should know that chart.

    Here is some info on each Horsenality that should be helpful.

    Characteristics of a "Right Brained" (RB) Extrovert include being frantic, fearful, and may have a tendency to bolt and rear. RB Extroverts are usually held back and tied down when they are panicky (martingales, nosebands, gag bits, twisted wire, etc).
    RB horses act instinctively, without thinking, just like they operate in the wild. There is no time to think, the moment they perceive danger they react in fear and take flight. At the minimum, RB horses are unconfident. At worst, they are often described as crazy! What is certain is that they are dangerous... dangerous to ride, dangerous when they are in unfamiliar situations. They are fearful, spooky, claustrophobic, over-reactive, hypersensitive, can't think, emotional and have difficulty with anything that changes. Horses operating in the RB mode are not safe. They don't have self-control and they have a lot of trouble learning.
    RB horses need you to build their confidence. They need lots of 'approach and retreat' instead of being pushed past their confidence thresholds. They also need lots of repetition when learning, because changes scare them. Once they are confident they become better learners because their brain doesn't shut down with fear.
    Extroverted horses tend to be energetic, excitable and quick and need quick action from their riders and handlers. They need their frantic patterns to be effectively interrupted and their energy to be constructively directed. This makes them calmer and focuses their attention.

    Characteristics of a "Right Brained" (RB) Introvert include being tense, shy, unpredictable, and may have a tendency to freeze, and then explode. RB Introverts are usually pushed to go forward when they are hesitant and unsure.
    RB horses act instinctively, without thinking, just like they operate in the wild. There is no time to think, the moment they perceive danger they react in fear and take flight. At the minimum, RB horses are unconfident. At worst, they are often described as crazy! What is certain is that they are dangerous... dangerous to ride, dangerous when they are in unfamiliar situations. They are fearful, spooky, claustrophobic, over-reactive, hypersensitive, can't think, emotional and have difficulty with anything that changes. Horses operating in the RB mode are not safe. They don't have self-control and they have a lot of trouble learning.
    RB horses need you to build their confidence. They need lots of 'approach and retreat' instead of being pushed past their confidence thresholds. They also need lots of repetition when learning, because changes scare them. Once they are confident they become better learners because their brain doesn't shut down with fear.
    Introverted horses tend to appears withdrawn and "slow" and need things to happen very slowly. These horses are so often misread as quiet and stubborn, but in the RB Introvert?s case, he has crawled into his shell while the LB Introvert has shut you out, much like the teenager who pretends he can?t hear you. These horses need you to be able to do nothing, sometimes for quite a while before they become confident enough to come out, or curious enough to want to engage.

    Characteristics of a "Left Brained" (LB) Extrovert include being mischievous, energetic, willful, disobedient, domineering, and may have a tendency to be mouthy, nip and bite. LB Extroverts are easy to train unless you are boring and repetitive in which case they act up and become unruly.
    LB horses are not afraid of people, they are self confident, brave, are relatively insensitive, playful, mouthy, exuberant and dominant. At minimum, these horses can be pushy and disobedient, and at worst they are aggressive. Keep in mind, these horses can be dangerous when they don't like or trust people.
    LB horses need you to become a lot more interesting. They need things to do. They are usually quite playful and are easily bored by riders who are fixated on perfecting a maneuver, and that's what makes them act up. Because they are so confident they are fast learners.
    Extroverted horses tend to be energetic, excitable and quick and need quick action from their riders and handlers. They need their frantic patterns to be effectively interrupted and their energy to be constructively directed. This makes them calmer and focuses their attention.

    Characteristics of "Left Brained" (LB) Introverts include bored, disinterested, unmotivated, sulls up (stops and won't go forward in defiance), lazy and stubborn and may have a tendency to buck. LB Introverts simply win out by being non-responsive until you give up.
    LB horses are not afraid of people, they are self confident, brave, are relatively insensitive, playful, mouthy, exuberant and dominant. At minimum, these horses can be pushy and disobedient, and at worst they are aggressive. Keep in mind, these horses can be dangerous when they don't like or trust people.
    LB horses need you to become a lot more interesting. They need things to do. They are usually quite playful and are easily bored by riders who are fixated on perfecting a maneuver, and that's what makes them act up. Because they are so confident they are fast learners.
    Introverted horses tend to appears withdrawn and "slow" and need things to happen very slowly. These horses are so often misread as quiet and stubborn, but in the RB Introvert's case, he has crawled into his shell while the LB Introvert has shut you out, much like the teenager who pretends he can't hear you. These horses need you to be able to do nothing, sometimes for quite a while before they become confident enough to come out, or curious enough to want to engage.
         
        09-15-2009, 10:46 PM
      #13
    Foal
    I can't provide much help for you but we had a horse that was "bored"....so we were told. Recommended we buy him a ball. Which I did, he loves it (actually he is on his second as he tore the first one up).

    My early experience with horses was only with working horses and my mom had no inclination to have a horse for pleasure. She would roll over in her grave laughing if she knew I bought a horse a ball.
         
        09-15-2009, 11:29 PM
      #14
    Yearling
    ^^My Mustang loves the horse ball, it is his fave...he will go out of his way to kick and push it. I know alot of ppl who think that it is silly and horses should not kick balls and it is a distraction but it is fun and who says horses shouldnt play with balls? : )
         
        09-16-2009, 12:04 AM
      #15
    Yearling
    I got tanner a ball too. He doesn't play with it as much as see it as a distraction. At any rate he has stopped his vice of wood chewing which was it's intended purpose and his pasture mate absolutely loves the ball. They are both into it if I go out and kick it around with them.
         
        09-16-2009, 07:59 AM
      #16
    Foal
    I've actually been tossing around the idea of getting a ball for Milo... I just feel kind of silly buying a massive ball for my horse. I'm not sure he'd actually take any interest in it, glad to see some positive posts regarding the idea. At the very least it would be introducing something new to the horses which would be fun to watch.
         
        09-16-2009, 08:12 AM
      #17
    Foal
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by tealamutt    

    Ps I have NO clue what "out thinking" him is. And for the love of God don't use the words "common sense". I was not raised around horses and clearly don't fully understand them. Spell it out like I'm a child from mars!

    Thank you. Can you feel my desperation?
    That made me giggle Tealamutt... I feel your desperation...first hand...LOL

    Common sense tells the non-horse owner to get out of the way when a horse is about to run you over (it's that pesky survival instinct we have). Common sense in the world of horse ownership means show that horse who is boss or create an absolute monster! What a conflict we are having!!
         
        09-16-2009, 09:36 AM
      #18
    Yearling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Miloismyboy    
    That made me giggle Tealamutt... I feel your desperation...first hand...LOL

    Common sense tells the non-horse owner to get out of the way when a horse is about to run you over (it's that pesky survival instinct we have). Common sense in the world of horse ownership means show that horse who is boss or create an absolute monster! What a conflict we are having!!

    Thank god for you Milo, or I'd have torn my hair out long ago. It is great to know there is someone who is reading me loud and clear, and going through the exact same thing. Yesterday he actually came when I called him, which made me feel like a heel because it was when I gathered him up to take him to school. Poor Mr.
         
        09-16-2009, 01:57 PM
      #19
    Trained
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by tealamutt    
    so kevinshorses I've seen a lot of your posts and like a lot of the things you have to say. Here is one specific problem I face; he runs me over. YES I know it means he has no respect, but I am trying hard to work on it but don't really totally know how. I can get his feet moving but overall it seems to do little good.

    Here is a typical scenario: I try to put him in the crossties (not actually hooking him up just asking him to stand) and he barrels right on top of me to get out so I make him back (him fighting the whole way sometimes nearly dragging me) and stand where I put him the first time.

    Where are the crossties? Is he frightened by tieing? Can you back him with a wiggle of the lead and your body language? If your not doing that you're just shoving him where he doesn't want to be instead of making him want to be there.


    Then he barrels forward again, this time with a bite (SMACK). We repeat, I back him up put him where he was, release pressure as soon as he stands still and then forward again we go. It goes on forever. It seems like I'm making no progress at all.

    Horses obtain dominance by making other horses move thier feet. Make your horse back past where you want him and then release pressure even if he doesn't stand still. When he comes forward back him up more. You're asking him to back so when he does you release pressure.

    If I'm outside leading him (which is the one area we have really moved forward in- he now leads pretty well), and stop to talk with someone he'll hold still for maybe 10 seconds then barrel forward. I back him to where he was, forward again. Back him again and this time he lunges forward with more determination. I have had this go on for an hour or more, each time he seems to shut down more and more, working his mouth and getting pissed and either less responsive or downright dangerously pushy. I don't know- I mean an hour... am I giving up too soon? I don't want to stop asking until he at least tries to do what I ask but it seems like working too long at the same thing is not good either.

    If he'll hold still for 10 seconds then move off after 8. Teach him to do what I have heard called the million dollar move because that's what it's worth. You ask your horse to move one direction around you about a quarter to half a turn. Then, disengage the hindquarters, back him one step then yield his front quarters around. He should be facing the opposite direction. This is a lot more work for the horse than standing and you're also making him move his feet and engage his brain. Before you ask him to do something have a really clear idea of what you're asking and when you will release pressure. This will help you keep the lessons short.


    What the H am I doing wrong (I am sure it's me). I always make sure it ends with him at least standing for 10 seconds and we only go forward when I decide. I have never let a session end because he wore me out, but have wanted to. Please help me!!


    Hang in there for a while at least but quit before you get hurt or the horse becomes so dangerous he'll hurt someone. You might need to concentrate on moving his feet where you want them to go rather than making him stand for too long. If you can direct his feet standing will come soon. If you just can't get a handle on him then send him to a good trainer. Do you're research and call on references so you get a good trainer.

    ps I have NO clue what "out thinking" him is. And for the love of God don't use the words "common sense". I was not raised around horses and clearly don't fully understand them. Spell it out like I'm a child from mars!

    Thank you. Can you feel my desperation?


    I hope this helped. Remember you can buy a lot of training for what an emergency room visit costs.
         
        09-16-2009, 07:50 PM
      #20
    Yearling
    Thanks kevinshorses, I'm going to try that million dollar move of yours. He responds much better when I'm engaging his brain, standing still makes him loopy. I cannot back him with a wiggle yet. I just learned about this exercise and we're going to start working on it.

    I have a trainer helping me, she is great but we just started so not a lot of progress yet but still I see changes in his behavior and most importantly learning what I am doing wrong. You're right on the ER front- I am careful not to let either one of us get in a situation where we'll get hurt. I know my limits for the most part. I think what I see has very rude and frustrating would be mild to someone with more experience. He's pushy, not dangerous. Thanks for your advice, it was well worded and I can't wait to start trying it out.
         

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