Lope departures
 
 

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Lope departures

This is a discussion on Lope departures within the Natural Horsemanship forums, part of the Training Horses category
  • How to get slow lope departure
  • Lope departures horses

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    11-01-2012, 09:21 PM
  #1
Foal
Lope departures

Hello im horselover3278 im new here my best friend horselover3418 and I have a probleme with my paint horse guelding and everytime I ask him to lope he jumps into it races around the arena. Do you have any idea how I can prevent that or how I can get better at loping so for competing and regular fun riding im better at it.....HELP....

Horselover3278
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    11-01-2012, 09:35 PM
  #2
Foal
Hi Horselover3278. I understand your pronblem as when I first bought my mare. She did the same! The best way to deal with this is to not let him get away with it. Right now he is testing you. You've obviously let him get away with it once, maybe by acceident but you cbviously have. So now he's thinking he can do it now. Practice lope deparures often and if he gets away with it, don't give up. If by the end of the riding lesson/ session, he hasn't stopped, focus on something else, leave it at a good note and don't treat him to anything special. My QH mare often thought she would get away with it, and I, acciedently, let her by barebacking her and not doing anything, letting her sleep. Also if he continues to do, they're could be a health problem. Maybe a stiff back or stiff muscles! If you can try taking it easy on his legs when you ride and if he isn't responding, like I've metionbed, there could be stiff muscles or something else, wrong. There could also be just a stuborness thought there where he thinks he outrules you
Good luck
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    11-02-2012, 11:57 PM
  #3
Super Moderator
Collection, Collection, Collection.

If you want good lead departures, you have to know what a good lead departure is. A good lead departure is when the horse's head is down, his shoulders are up, his back is rounded and he 'pushes' off into the lope (or canter) from the hind end first.

If a horse is 'hopping' front end first into a lope, you need all of the above -- and you need to get well rounded collection while in the lope before you can expect a good lope departure with it.
     
    11-03-2012, 01:01 AM
  #4
Started
Not that I disagree with anyone above, but could you tell us more? How well trained is he? You? What kind of shape is he in? What do you generally do riding-wise? I ask only because the right answer and solution might depend on the cause of his rushing. Is he a horse that just loves to run, has been taught to run, is out of shape and can't balance well, or is just testing you and pushing your buttons? Does his tack fit properly without any pinching or rubbing?

My guy used to do that, but as he got stronger and gained better rhythm and balance, it's gone away entirely without any specific effort from me unless he's stressed or anxious. So, for us, just doing "a million and one transitions" fixed it. But my guy is essentially lazy and not one to run and run for the fun or challenge of it like some horses do.
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    11-03-2012, 12:44 PM
  #5
Foal
Dear everybody,
He is a very well trained horse, he's trained for pleasure, command, trail, trail riding in general and very well tempered. He's 10 years old. He was out of shape before I got him but when I got him I got him back into shape and he's fine now. He loves to run but he only does it when he's in the pasture with all his buddy's. He's is a paint/ and I think thoroughbred or quater horse or pure bred paint I still have to find out....
For me I have been riding english for 3 years and riding western for 5 years (in counting). I have OEF level 1 and currently going for rider level 2. My instroctor says that I could go for my rider level 3 today but I have to pass my other levels first :P. I have competed many times and won reserve champion last year. My parents and friends support me 100% with my riding and a follow the instroctions of my instroctor, vets and ect...
My horse is very well behaved most days but i'd say 15% of the time he has his "off" days.
Are there any other informations you would like to know? If so please, don't hesitate to ask.

Horselover3278
     
    11-03-2012, 05:43 PM
  #6
Started
It sounds like both you and he should know how to transition to and from a lope properly then. One exercise that may help is counting strides and then changing gait. For example: walk 5 strides, trot 5 strides, then walk 5 strides. Do this at walk/stop and walk/trot first to get him into the mindset that he WILL be asked to change gait soon, so he's expecting it. Then start to include the canter/lope. So walk 5, trot 5, walk 5, trot 5, canter 5, walk 5, or whatever combination you like. The idea is for him to be thinking and ready to LISTEN immediately after changing gaits rather than rushing off like a fool. I did and still do a lot of it as it is a great exercise for both horse and rider.

Another option is to MAKE him run when he decides to rush off, but you have to know your horse and be comfortable with it. My guy would get himself spooked when we first started cantering and then wound want to run off rather than listen to me. So I let him. He wanted to slow down and stop after about twice around the arena. I made him keep running. And then I made him keep running another lap. Then I asked him to stop. If he listened, he could rest, if not, around we kept going as I make him keep up the speed until he was listening and just waiting for me to ask. As I said, this works well with horses who are essentially lazy, not as well or quickly for some fit horses who just love to go.
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    11-04-2012, 01:10 AM
  #7
Trained
Collection is very important as is, as I learned, not binding a horse up and staying out of his way. I found myself and have watched others who have had the same problem of the front end popping up have tendency to want to "contain" a horses front end and hold it down by holding the face. When doing so, you put a lot of emphasis on the front end and weigh it down rather than worrying about the back end which is where the lope departure comes from.
I found initially correcting became easier when sitting straight up and rolling the hips, slightly lighter seat bone on the inside(as you should) to encourage drive/reach with the hind legs very slight tip of the nose(to the inside, not the outside, as it causes a shoulder drop) for a correct lead departure.
Mind you this was how I was taught, some do it different. At first he might raise his head a little but that can come right with time. You can't place the head correctly if the parts behing are not correct.
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    11-04-2012, 01:14 AM
  #8
Banned
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cherie    
Collection, Collection, Collection.

If you want good lead departures, you have to know what a good lead departure is. A good lead departure is when the horse's head is down, his shoulders are up, his back is rounded and he 'pushes' off into the lope (or canter) from the hind end first.

If a horse is 'hopping' front end first into a lope, you need all of the above -- and you need to get well rounded collection while in the lope before you can expect a good lope departure with it.
This is soooooo sooooooo sooooooo correct!!! I get perfect lope departures EVERYTIME now if I take a moment to collect my horse and pick him up, keep him straight or nose slightly tipped to inside and ask.....and away you go
     
    11-04-2012, 11:58 PM
  #9
Showing
How often are you arena riding and how often does he get a mental refresher out on the trails? Since he has the training he may be sick of going in circles and decides to show you what he can do.
     
    11-06-2012, 04:46 PM
  #10
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by Saddlebag    
How often are you arena riding and how often does he get a mental refresher out on the trails? Since he has the training he may be sick of going in circles and decides to show you what he can do.
I ride with her all the time, and she texts me everytime she's there. She rides in the arena about 3 days a week, same as mne, and we trail ride about 2 every 2 weeks
     

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