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Which Method Do You Use?

This is a discussion on Which Method Do You Use? within the Natural Horsemanship forums, part of the Training Horses category

     
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        05-29-2010, 05:51 PM
      #11
    Started
    In my experience the Horsenalities are extremely accurate. I've never had a doubt in my mind what I need to do with a horse when I evaluate him based on characteristics I notice. You approach each horse differently, in different intensities, at different times, even if they are the same Horsenality. One LBE might be more extreme than the other, which means your strategy needs to be altered a little. This is adapting.
         
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        05-29-2010, 07:18 PM
      #12
    Foal
    Parelli is good if you're just starting out with horses and know nothing, but still keep an open mind. Always keep an open mind, 'cause otherwise it won't work.

    I have found that Parelli does work (my boss does it with her horses) but I still don't personally like it (my head can just not get around the 'games' stuff). There's just something missing that I've found through my personal experiences.

    I used books, random dvd's, random tips from people, and observation (of my horse and of trainers) to turn my gelding from a spooker-nut, disrespectful a-hole into a horse that likes to joke around with me and have 'discussions'. As for my mare, I used what I learned from my gelding and applied it to her... so for me I would say I use 'my way'.

    I basically went from knowing nothing about horse training, to rehabilitating two horses within 3 years that way. Lol.

    I like Monty Roberts, Gawani Pony Boy and the guy who broke my mare for me. He would kill me if he saw my mare now, but I will admit I haven't made the time and stuff to do what she needs... BUT I WILL FIX IT! D<

    I also tried some - uh - John... Lyons... which was what the people who gave me the tips were using. A couple of them worked, a couple didn't. I didn't watch his dvd's though, so technically I don't know how he works.
         
        05-29-2010, 07:43 PM
      #13
    Started
    So I'm a beginner because I use Parelli?
         
        05-29-2010, 08:00 PM
      #14
    Foal
    LOL! No, that's not what I meant. Sorry... I know it sounded like it.

    I just meant that if you know absolutely nothing about horses or horse training and want to get into it, it's one of the (I think) easier methods to learn how to work around and with a horse.

    If you know things but want to continue learning and understand the way he teaches and all that, then you benefit from it too.

    As long as you're open to continue learning and stuff, then any method will work. It's mostly what you're comfortable with, right?

    I don't benefit from it 'cause I don't understand the concept of games. Like... at all, not just in terms of how he's broken it down. In school when teacher's tried to get me to use games to learn something I got more lost than I was originally.
         
        05-29-2010, 10:02 PM
      #15
    Started
    Parelli is the only thing I use in my foundation training. Once I have my foundation complete I want to start Dressage with my guy, but still using and maintaining the principles I've learned through Parelli. Thank goodness there are people out there like Karen Rohlf and Walter Zettl who are 'Parelli friendly' if you will.
         
        05-30-2010, 08:16 AM
      #16
    Weanling
    Defensiveness, in horses and in people, is a sign of insecurity. If you are truly secure in what you are doing, then there is no need to defend it since the proof would be in the work.

    I liked what Jhinnua had to say. A big determining factor in who you chose to listen to is determined by what you are looking for in your horse and your relationship with them. I was talking to someone the other day who told me that in making progress, every student must kill their mentor (metaphorically of course). It means that you must outgrow them in your progress and develop your own way of thinking. She was saying this as looking at my past experience with horses. Now, I'm not saying that I know more than any of my previous mentors, and I am still on good terms and talk regularly with all of them and I still have a great deal of respect and gratitude towads all of them, however there came a time in the training process where I was no longer in need of them and went searching for new blood. It is my goal that my students will do this and they will be so secure in what they are doing that they will begin to question what I am doing and develop on their own. The changes that you recognize and make for yourself are the changes that you will remember the most.

    I always laugh when people see my horses and ask what "method" I follow, and I have actually grown quite disgusted with the word. The more I'm around horse, the more I realize that they do not follow a rule book. I too often see people get lost in the method and not see the horse, or a horse get lost in a method and not be able to see beyond the method. When I walk into my barn or pasture and heads turn wanting to be pulled out first I start to think "what method do I use when I go to lunch with a friend? Or when I help friends that own a local restaurant?" There is no method, I communicate, do my job, and help others do theirs. That is the same thing that I do with horses, there is no method behind getting them to go in a circle or jump a barrel, just years of learning the language first hand.

    Horses are not video games that you push this button and this happens, or "if you have this version, then you must do x and y to get z result". I personally would feel quite insulted if someone were to talk to me that way. Don't get lost in the method, get lost in the horse. If you take the time to listen, they will let you know exactly what needs to be done.

    I'm not saying to go it alone, watch every show you can, read every book you can, audit every clinic or lesson that you can, but never lose yourself and always be prepared to "kill your mentor".
         
        05-30-2010, 08:30 AM
      #17
    Green Broke
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by FlitterBug    
    Defensiveness, in horses and in people, is a sign of insecurity. If you are truly secure in what you are doing, then there is no need to defend it since the proof would be in the work.

    I liked what Jhinnua had to say. A big determining factor in who you chose to listen to is determined by what you are looking for in your horse and your relationship with them. I was talking to someone the other day who told me that in making progress, every student must kill their mentor (metaphorically of course). It means that you must outgrow them in your progress and develop your own way of thinking. She was saying this as looking at my past experience with horses. Now, I'm not saying that I know more than any of my previous mentors, and I am still on good terms and talk regularly with all of them and I still have a great deal of respect and gratitude towads all of them, however there came a time in the training process where I was no longer in need of them and went searching for new blood. It is my goal that my students will do this and they will be so secure in what they are doing that they will begin to question what I am doing and develop on their own. The changes that you recognize and make for yourself are the changes that you will remember the most.

    I always laugh when people see my horses and ask what "method" I follow, and I have actually grown quite disgusted with the word. The more I'm around horse, the more I realize that they do not follow a rule book. I too often see people get lost in the method and not see the horse, or a horse get lost in a method and not be able to see beyond the method. When I walk into my barn or pasture and heads turn wanting to be pulled out first I start to think "what method do I use when I go to lunch with a friend? Or when I help friends that own a local restaurant?" There is no method, I communicate, do my job, and help others do theirs. That is the same thing that I do with horses, there is no method behind getting them to go in a circle or jump a barrel, just years of learning the language first hand.

    Horses are not video games that you push this button and this happens, or "if you have this version, then you must do x and y to get z result". I personally would feel quite insulted if someone were to talk to me that way. Don't get lost in the method, get lost in the horse. If you take the time to listen, they will let you know exactly what needs to be done.

    I'm not saying to go it alone, watch every show you can, read every book you can, audit every clinic or lesson that you can, but never lose yourself and always be prepared to "kill your mentor".
    absolutely fantastic post! You said everything I was planning on saying!
         
        05-30-2010, 09:24 AM
      #18
    Weanling
    I like Chris Cox, Stacey Westfall & a touch of Monty Roberts. Not so much the method - join up is fun, I've taken a clinic and there is more than what you see on the show, or read in the book.

    Read up on as many as you can, watch the shows on RFD-TV if you have it, You Tube if you don't, try out several methods and see what you fit best with.
         
        05-30-2010, 01:00 PM
      #19
    Green Broke
    I agree 100% flitterbug!

    I take clinics from anyone who comes to town, and I firstly pick out the stuff I like, then pick out the stuff that works for myhorse.( 'stuff' meaning knowladge)

    Except I'm not sure I will ever outgrow my mentor... She is like, 50 years older then me, and has been around horses her whole life, and trained with high level people, haha. But I never just do everything her or my other instructor say, I learn from them, and I agree with them a lot, but I'm the one student that always asks why? At the barn. LOL. They've never said something I didn't disagree with, I just preffered a different way :)
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        05-30-2010, 01:33 PM
      #20
    Weanling
    My last mentor, who I still speak with regularly, was a direct student of Tom Dorrance, Ray Hunt, Buck Brannaman, she was a 3* Parelli instructor, and studied with osteopaths and classical dressage trainers. There is no way that I know more than she does as I have only listed a couple of the big names that she studied with.

    However, there came a time when I could guess everything that she was going to say before she said it, I taught clinics per her request and answered questions the same way that she did. I found myself putting a spin on things that she said, tweaking them to my own liking and finding my own solutions to problems after she started me on the path. Once I found myself doing that, I didn't feel completely right teaching under her name. Now, she is on my list of mentors, but I have gone on to who I am and what works best for me. The horse knows when you are honest with them and when you are lying about who you are inside, which is why we can't put faith in the methods we use, but more in who we are while using them.

    It still means a lot to me that she refers clients to me, I've been told by others about the high regard that she puts on my name, and I will do the same for her and know that she will always welcome a call or visit if I run into a problem that I can't figure out. I have complete respect for her as I know she does for me.

    That is what I meant when I said "kill your mentor", because you can't truly be a leader while idolizing another. You have to have the strength to go out from under that wing and the confidence to begin to use what you know to figure things out for yourself. That is when the horse will naturally follow you.
         

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