Monte in his new bitless bridle - Page 2
 
 

       The Horse Forum > Training Horses > Natural Horsemanship

Monte in his new bitless bridle

This is a discussion on Monte in his new bitless bridle within the Natural Horsemanship forums, part of the Training Horses category

    Like Tree7Likes

     
    LinkBack Thread Tools
        12-05-2012, 05:26 AM
      #11
    Foal
    Lovely picture, thanks for sharing your bitless experience, I'm just riding in the plain parelli hackamore just now.

    Claire
         
    Sponsored Links
    Advertisement
     
        12-05-2012, 06:08 AM
      #12
    Trained
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Thunderspark    
    ...but I've always said if a horse is going to bolt they will do it with or without a bit, everyone says you have no control over your horse...
    The bit doesn't give you some master control. It does allow more precise communication with the horse. Prior to a bolt, for example, I can use a bit to say, "Not so fast, shorten the stride of your front legs, I'm here and you need to think about me". Without a bit, my horse can easily get too excited to listen to a halter, and then she becomes more likely to bolt.

    If she tenses to the point where her next step is likely to be a leap into a bolt, then a bit gives me more control of her nose so I can say, "Do a 180 left before you bolt". If possible, I always choose left because her balance is better to the left and I don't like falling. A couple of 180s in a row may be enough to get her to calm down and not bolt at all.

    My gelding is more relaxed with a bit than bitless because he likes to know what his rider thinks. Without a bit, he starts to worry. I've ridden them both bitless many times, and would be OK with riding the gelding off property without a bit. I use a bit with him because he seems happier with a bit than without. My mare is getting calmer with time, and may someday be OK to ride off property without a bit, but she isn't there yet. I've done a lot of bitless bolts on her so I know going bitless doesn't help her any.

    Not trying to rain on anyone's bitless parade, but just reminding folks that each horse is an individual and a rider with a bit may have a good reason for using one. I agree that when bitless works for a horse, it is a very nice option.
         
        12-05-2012, 02:54 PM
      #13
    Yearling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by bsms    
    The bit doesn't give you some master control. It does allow more precise communication with the horse. Prior to a bolt, for example, I can use a bit to say, "Not so fast, shorten the stride of your front legs, I'm here and you need to think about me". Without a bit, my horse can easily get too excited to listen to a halter, and then she becomes more likely to bolt.

    If she tenses to the point where her next step is likely to be a leap into a bolt, then a bit gives me more control of her nose so I can say, "Do a 180 left before you bolt". If possible, I always choose left because her balance is better to the left and I don't like falling. A couple of 180s in a row may be enough to get her to calm down and not bolt at all.

    My gelding is more relaxed with a bit than bitless because he likes to know what his rider thinks. Without a bit, he starts to worry. I've ridden them both bitless many times, and would be OK with riding the gelding off property without a bit. I use a bit with him because he seems happier with a bit than without. My mare is getting calmer with time, and may someday be OK to ride off property without a bit, but she isn't there yet. I've done a lot of bitless bolts on her so I know going bitless doesn't help her any.

    Not trying to rain on anyone's bitless parade, but just reminding folks that each horse is an individual and a rider with a bit may have a good reason for using one. I agree that when bitless works for a horse, it is a very nice option.
    There are also times where there is no notice of a horse bolting, they may spook at something and be on the run before you even know what is happening.
    Yes each horse is different but I do think if you have a good relationship with your horse it shouldn't matter whether you ride with or without a bite......just my opinion.....
         
        12-05-2012, 05:17 PM
      #14
    Trained
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Thunderspark    
    There are also times where there is no notice of a horse bolting...if you have a good relationship with your horse it shouldn't matter whether you ride with or without a bite......just my opinion.....
    My mare has bolted enough that I've learned the signs leading up to it. She has never bolted without warning. She has only told me in a language I wasn't ready to listen to yet.

    Maybe I don't know what a good relationship is. If it reaches a point where she bolts, my relationship isn't going to stop her. During a bolt, she forgets I'm there. A bit gives me a more sensitive tool for re-establishing the lines of communication, and better control of her nose if she isn't ready to listen.

    One might as well say that if you have a good enough relationship, you don't need reins because she'll listen to your seat and leg. Or a lead rope, because if your relationship is good she'll follow you without a rope. Both of those CAN happen, but there is a reason why lead ropes, halters and even bits sell...
         
        12-05-2012, 05:36 PM
      #15
    Foal
    I think if a horse is truly bolting, it doesn't matter what you have on it, it will stop when the panic is over. Lucky for me my Monte isn't a bolter (yet), he spins and takes about 2 strides and decides that it took too much effort!!

    I don't believe as some people do that bits are cruel, I believe the hands on the end are cruel! However I do believe it much be more comfortable for a horse without a bit, especially when on the trails for hours.

    I have found since riding bitless that I have concentrated much more on my seat and getting my horse soft and listening to me. So I guess a lot of it comes down to us and how much time we spend of getting a good relationship with our horse, how much trust we put in them. To have full trust you have to give it, with 500kgs of spooky horse flesh that can be hard, but we expect them to trust us and go past all sorts of things that go against their instincts. We ride them, and when we don't get the response we want we often kick them, pull them in mouth and in some cases yell at them, and then we expect them to trust us and go past something that is scary to them. ( no one get offended not having a go, I have been guilty of this too, just trying to change my ways!)

    I think it doesn't matter what you ride in , in the end its about "does your horse trust you" and if he does than you have the world :)
         
        12-05-2012, 06:40 PM
      #16
    Trained
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by maz78    
    ...So I guess a lot of it comes down to us and how much time we spend of getting a good relationship with our horse, how much trust we put in them. To have full trust you have to give it, with 500kgs of spooky horse flesh that can be hard, but we expect them to trust us and go past all sorts of things that go against their instincts...

    ...I think it doesn't matter what you ride in , in the end its about "does your horse trust you" and if he does than you have the world :)
    Well, I've got 4+ years sunk into Mia. I've been with her when she was sick, walked her for uncounted hours on a lead line, ridden her uncounted hundreds of times, spent a couple thousand dollars having a professional trainer work with her...

    I expect her to trust me because I've earned it. Not only am I smarter than she is, I feed her and water her daily and couldn't estimate the hours I've spent with her. But the trainer warned me that Mia would always be an intense horse, very alert and maybe a bit too much imagination. I'd have sold her to a better rider by now, except better riders don't want to buy PITA horses. She is improving, slowly.

    It does matter what you ride in. I use an Aussie-style saddle because I'd have hit the ground a number of times without one, and I already have an almost 4 year old back injury from the one time I came off of Mia. Tack matters, which is why we spend money on it. There is a reason why most people use reins and stirrups. Not every horse needs reins and stirrups, but darn near all will need them at some point in their life, and most need them most of their lives.

    Not all horses need bits. My Appy gelding can be ridden without one, but he seems to relax more WITH one. He'll obey well either way. My mare is a lot more intense. When she starts to worry, she wants me to play with the reins and tell her I'm there. 90% of the time, I could trail ride with her in a sidepull halter. It the other 10% that becomes dangerous for her as well as for me - yet I am 10 times closer to her than to my Appy gelding.

    Different horses. Different personalities. Different needs. One of the things that 4 years of living with Mia has taught me is that training & personality counts for more than 'relationship'. We've GOT relationship! It is training that still has holes, and to a certain extent, it is her personality.
         
        12-06-2012, 12:29 AM
      #17
    Yearling
    My mare was 3 when I got her, had 30 days of riding on her, she's a very sensitive horse and was very reactive. I spent alot of time gaining her trust and me learning to trust her, she's coming up 11 this spring and I've rode her in her halter and also her biteless bridle. The first 3yrs. I rode her with her halter (rope) and a bareback pad, I think that helped me learn to trust her and she learnt to trust my judgement........then again I think she is a very special horse :)
    My grandkids have been riding her by theirselves, double and all three at once just in our outdoor arena, I would never let them go out of there on her because I know how things can happen, now my other horse the grandson who is 13 now rode out with me a few times this summer but not on her but one of my other horses....
         
        12-06-2012, 01:29 AM
      #18
    Foal
    I ride in a stock saddle out on the trail, not cause my horse needs it and I don't trust him but because of my own ability to stay on when he does come across something that causes him to shy, I wasn't suggesting people should not need tack I was just trying to say bitless or bit, as long as it works best for your horse. As horses as individuals of course they are going to have different needs . I had a mare that I loved to bits and she me. She met me at the the gate when she saw me coming, she wouldn't leave the gate till I left. This horse was a bundle of nerves when I got her. I sold her because after 2 yrs she had come such a long way but still was a handful on the road (shying, spinning ,rearing) and I didnt have the skills to get her through it. So although we had a great relationship, I obvisously couldnt work out how to get that last bit of trust. After doing Carlos Tabernaberri's clinic last weekend, I wish I had of done it with her, cause now I realise there was so much more I could have done.

    I don't want to burst your bubble but feeding, watering caring for a horse when it is sick , isnn't earning there trust/repect, that is our obligation when we become a horse owner!! I wish the horses worked that way and were gratefull for all we do for them and the $$$$ we spend, it would make it so much easier. But we earn their respect by becoming a worthy leader. Im glad your mare is improving for you, that's all we can ask and if they improve bit by bit then in the end I'm sure you will have a great horse. Good on you for sticking it out :)
         
        12-06-2012, 01:37 AM
      #19
    Yearling
    I take it previously you were in the standard rope halter setup?

    Do you find the light rider gives more definition to your cues?
    Do the reins feel a bit lighter than the lead rope with clip? I find the rope can feel uneven where the clip is.
         
        12-06-2012, 01:49 AM
      #20
    Foal
    I used the rope halter for a couple of weeks when I first started.

    Main thing I found is the rope halter slips around a lot which makes the cues a bit harder for the horse.
    In the light rider rope bridle it stays in place and gives a much more direct cue. I guess it depends on the rider to . If you are really good with your seats and legs (which im not there yet lol) then the halter would probably be fine, but personally I feel more comfortable when im out n the trail knowing my halter is not going to slip and move around if I really need to let the horse know its there!

    The reins that come with the light rider have a small clip each end attaching to bridle as normal reins would , so no uneveness
         

    Quick Reply
    Please help keep the Horse Forum enjoyable by reporting rude posts.
    Message:
    Options

    Register Now

    In order to be able to post messages on the The Horse Forum forums, you must first register.

    Already have a Horse Forum account?
    Members are allowed only one account per person at the Horse Forum, so if you've made an account here in the past you'll need to continue using that account. Please do not create a new account or you may lose access to the Horse Forum. If you need help recovering your existing account, please Contact Us. We'll be glad to help!

    New to the Horse Forum?
    Please choose a username you will be satisfied with using for the duration of your membership at the Horse Forum. We do not change members' usernames upon request because that would make it difficult for everyone to keep track of who is who on the forum. For that reason, please do not incorporate your horse's name into your username so that you are not stuck with a username related to a horse you may no longer have some day, or use any other username you may no longer identify with or care for in the future.

    User Name:
    Password
    Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
    Password:
    Confirm Password:
    Email Address
    Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
    Email Address:

    Log-in

    Human Verification

    In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.


    Old Thread Warning
    This thread is more than 90 days old. When a thread is this old, it is often better to start a new thread rather than post to it. However, If you feel you have something of value to add to this particular thread, you can do so by checking the box below before submitting your post.

    Thread Tools

    Similar Threads
    Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
    which is better? Dr Cooks bitless bridle or NURTURAL BITLESS BRIDLE?? Teegz Horse Tack Reviews 16 05-19-2012 08:00 PM
    Bitless Bridle? SadieBug Horse Tack and Equipment 24 01-21-2011 12:20 PM
    nurtural bitless bridle VS bridle Frankiee CAN Tack 4 08-08-2010 08:02 PM
    LG Bitless Bridle? letsgetserious Horse Tack and Equipment 16 01-12-2010 12:16 AM
    Bitless bridle?? Hoofprints in the Sand Horse Tack and Equipment 17 01-13-2009 01:20 PM



    All times are GMT -4. The time now is 08:47 PM.


    Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
    Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
    Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0