Natural Horsemanship?? - Page 2
 
 

       The Horse Forum > Training Horses > Natural Horsemanship

Natural Horsemanship??

This is a discussion on Natural Horsemanship?? within the Natural Horsemanship forums, part of the Training Horses category

     
    LinkBack Thread Tools
        01-14-2010, 12:55 AM
      #11
    Foal
    My most simple explanation of natural horsemanship is when you give you horse freedom to make their own decision but then show them that every decision will either one, have a correction/consequence or two, will have a response of you leaving them alone(the reward).

    It's not about anything to do with tack it's about building a relationship with your horse through an understanding of horse psychology (which is very simplistic). When you see people riding bareback with no headgear they are just showcasing where you can go with natural horsemanship. But believe me there was months if not years of preparation to get to that point. It's not like the movie Flicka where she trains the mustang with an apple and virtually no tack haha.
         
    Sponsored Links
    Advertisement
     
        01-14-2010, 11:35 AM
      #12
    Foal
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by PaytonSidesHorsemanship    
    My most simple explanation of natural horsemanship is when you give you horse freedom to make their own decision but then show them that every decision will either one, have a correction/consequence or two, will have a response of you leaving them alone(the reward).

    It's not about anything to do with tack it's about building a relationship with your horse through an understanding of horse psychology (which is very simplistic). When you see people riding bareback with no headgear they are just showcasing where you can go with natural horsemanship. But believe me there was months if not years of preparation to get to that point. It's not like the movie Flicka where she trains the mustang with an apple and virtually no tack haha.
    As with any other ways of working with horses, NH has some great aspects. However, a dear friend who has 5 horses and works strictly with the Parelli method had a horrible thing happen with one of her horses. She'd unloaded him, and left him ground-tied, letting him make the right decision (this is a very intellegent woman who has had horses for decades, trained and rehabbed more that a few). He heard some horses calling out, took off, and ran through 3 fence lines, cutting to the bone on chest, front and hind legs. He's a beautiful grey Arab, and she spent months working with him. He's fine now, but has terrible scars. We do not think or see like horses, and cannot always expect them to make the right choices. Possibly I have the concept wrong, but I know what I saw, and the devastation both with the horse and my friend.
         
        01-14-2010, 11:50 AM
      #13
    Green Broke
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by rider4life    
    As with any other ways of working with horses, NH has some great aspects. However, a dear friend who has 5 horses and works strictly with the Parelli method had a horrible thing happen with one of her horses. She'd unloaded him, and left him ground-tied, letting him make the right decision (this is a very intellegent woman who has had horses for decades, trained and rehabbed more that a few). He heard some horses calling out, took off, and ran through 3 fence lines, cutting to the bone on chest, front and hind legs. He's a beautiful grey Arab, and she spent months working with him. He's fine now, but has terrible scars. We do not think or see like horses, and cannot always expect them to make the right choices. Possibly I have the concept wrong, but I know what I saw, and the devastation both with the horse and my friend.
    That accident does not have anything to do with Parelli method. Not many horses would choose to run through 3 fence lines. Might have more to do with personality and breed. The horse could have been loose in a pen and done the same thing. Ground tying did not cause the problem. Maybe the Parelli training helped prevent an accident sooner.
         
        01-14-2010, 04:46 PM
      #14
    Foal
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by churumbeque    
    That accident does not have anything to do with Parelli method. Not many horses would choose to run through 3 fence lines. Might have more to do with personality and breed. The horse could have been loose in a pen and done the same thing. Ground tying did not cause the problem. Maybe the Parelli training helped prevent an accident sooner.
    Darlin', you weren't there, don't know the woman or the horse. Please don't make such assumptions. It had everything to do with the method.
         
        01-14-2010, 06:03 PM
      #15
    Foal
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by rider4life    
    Darlin', you weren't there, don't know the woman or the horse. Please don't make such assumptions. It had everything to do with the method.
    There is no way that a method caused a horse to run through 3 fences. Just sounds like a horse that was really determined to get somewhere to me.

    But actually my methods teach horses to understand boundaries, this includes a fence as a boundary. So whatever method was used it sounds like it didn't establish boundaries strong enough.

    And please don't take any comment of mine as a slight on your friend.
         
        01-14-2010, 08:43 PM
      #16
    Started
    Yea, Parelli can't be blamed for the horse's accident. That could happen to ANY horse, regardless of what training method has been used. Horses are gregarious and prey animals, so we have to keep that in mind.
         
        01-15-2010, 11:30 AM
      #17
    Trained
    The fool that left thier horse without tying it up is to blame. Ground tying is turning your horse loose and hoping it doesn't move. It may work for a while but eventually the horse will wander off or if it spooks at somethingit could run through three fences. Had the woman just tied the horse up or kept it in hand Parrelli would not have been an issue.
         
        01-15-2010, 12:08 PM
      #18
    Foal
    Natural horsemanship is a vague term, like Christian. The meaning lies in the details and it may be meaningless. What is unnatural horsemanship? Talking to your horse? Giving your horse kisses? Lecturing your horse? Jumping your horse 500 times a day at a horse show? Keeping your horse in a stall? Shoeing your horse? Feeding your horse grain?
         
        01-15-2010, 03:51 PM
      #19
    Foal
    Natural implies that it is from nature no?? Take some time to watch a lead mare and how she interacts with all of the other horses in the herd--foals, fillies, mares, colts and studs and that is natural horsmanship. It is a way of thinking and interacting.

    All of the rest of it is simply techniques to achieve the goal but without the above the chances for success is slim to none.
         
        01-15-2010, 07:00 PM
      #20
    Yearling
    Yeah I like watching horses together in the paddock. It is so natural the way the lead mare saddles up the rest of the herd and rides them off to shows or sometimes it is just a quick bareback jaunt around the paddock. I also love the way the horses all take turns to free lunge each other around the paddock using their tails instead of carrot sticks - it is magical.

    With natural horsemanship we TRULY emulate the way horses work with each other.
         

    Quick Reply
    Please help keep the Horse Forum enjoyable by reporting rude posts.
    Message:
    Options

    Register Now

    In order to be able to post messages on the The Horse Forum forums, you must first register.

    Already have a Horse Forum account?
    Members are allowed only one account per person at the Horse Forum, so if you've made an account here in the past you'll need to continue using that account. Please do not create a new account or you may lose access to the Horse Forum. If you need help recovering your existing account, please Contact Us. We'll be glad to help!

    New to the Horse Forum?
    Please choose a username you will be satisfied with using for the duration of your membership at the Horse Forum. We do not change members' usernames upon request because that would make it difficult for everyone to keep track of who is who on the forum. For that reason, please do not incorporate your horse's name into your username so that you are not stuck with a username related to a horse you may no longer have some day, or use any other username you may no longer identify with or care for in the future.

    User Name:
    Password
    Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
    Password:
    Confirm Password:
    Email Address
    Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
    Email Address:

    Log-in

    Human Verification

    In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.


    Old Thread Warning
    This thread is more than 90 days old. When a thread is this old, it is often better to start a new thread rather than post to it. However, If you feel you have something of value to add to this particular thread, you can do so by checking the box below before submitting your post.

    Thread Tools

    Similar Threads
    Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
    What IS Natural Horsemanship? twogeldings Natural Horsemanship 4 04-21-2009 07:23 PM
    Natural Horsemanship Miss Dent Horse Training 35 04-16-2009 06:30 PM
    Natural Horsemanship mylucalove Horse Training 20 05-31-2008 08:10 AM
    Natural Horsemanship child in time Horse Training 16 01-24-2007 07:44 PM



    All times are GMT -4. The time now is 11:04 AM.


    Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
    Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
    Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0