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This is a discussion on Naughty Horse; within the Natural Horsemanship forums, part of the Training Horses category
  • Natural horsemanship for a naughty horse
  • Horses that are naughty forum

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    10-23-2012, 03:34 AM
  #11
Foal
Question

He is just such a sweet horse, he loves everyone wether he has respect for them or not, he is a champion sporting horse so he always has energy, he is cutproud and that's why he loves the mare so much, we thought it might of been in pain but he isnt, we have had checkups and everything, every ride we do something different, after a while and he wants to be unsaddled he rears constantly,we were told to let him go to were he wants and lounge him until he feels like he can't walk and then make him go to were you wanted and give him lots of pats and just walk or to kick him until he does, or just take your time to make him slowly go to were you want.

What do you think?
     
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    10-23-2012, 04:18 AM
  #12
Started
The only problem with the lunging is that he will get fitter and fitter and it will take longer and longer to get him to cut the crap out because he feels like he can't walk.
     
    10-23-2012, 08:09 PM
  #13
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by Flickie    
Reply; Flicka was the same when he got her and I just pushed and pushed her to do it because she just constantly tried to be the boss and had that personality that she just wouldnt give up but I would stay there for hours until she gave up and she is an angel after a year, but bandit is different, he will do what you what him to do aftertime, but he never improves.
Sounds like you were lucky to get away with it with your mare, especially since rearing tends to be the fault of the rider. I wouldn't advise that sort of approach, unless perhaps you're the Terminator & unbreakable! I know it sounds harsh, but for your safety & ultimately the safety & wellbeing of your horse(are you going to keep him & love on him still if he kills someone?), I agree thoroughly with Saranda.

Quote:
when he is naughty and rears either let him go to where he wants so he can calm down and take him back to what you where trying to do with him, or you can get off and lounge him till he fells like his legs are going to fall off and get on him so he knows no to be naughty
Afraid it sounds like whoever advised you knows little if any more about good horse training than you do. Horses live in & of the moment. They don't have a verbal language to be able to understand past & future events. Therefore reinforcement or punishment must happen *at the time of the behaviour* you want to affect. So for eg. If he rears & you let him go where he wants, you just reinforced the rearing. If he rears & you get off(never mind what you do next), you just reinforced the rearing. (That's not to say you should necessarily try to ride, let alone stay on a rearing horse unless you have a lot of skill & prepared to take the serious risks).

BTW, I don't agree with the 'break 'em' attitude either & don't think it's a good idea just to force a horse to do something until he finally gives in, and don't think it's a good move to lunge a horse & run him ragged... for a number of reasons. One reason is because I like horses & want them to like me & being with me & playing my games, not do it miserably because they have to.

Agree with FrancesB strongly too, except the very last bit - depending on the options available to you - such as good trainers, etc, - loving a horse may be a good reason to part with him. If you really love him, you want what's best for him & perhaps that's not to stay with you & risk a bullet or becoming more unmanageable. It's also a good reason to try to get to the bottom of the problem - such as ruling out pain/discomfort first 7 foremost - rather than just trying to perservere.

...And then I read he's 'cut proud', so assuming that's accurate, you're essentially dealing with a stallion, who tend to require more skilled handling than normal to stay safe. Love him enough to find him a good, skillful home!
themacpack and Val1991 like this.
     
    11-14-2012, 06:08 PM
  #14
Weanling
I would sell him or find a really good trainer. He sounds dangerous (no matter how affectionate he may seem), and needs a really experienced, brave trainer. Do you know a lot about this horse's history? I bet you're not the first rider who's dealt with this horse's rearing.

Lunging him until he's exhausted won't teach him anything, and, as one person already said, will just make him more fit.

Good luck and think of your own well-being.
     
    11-14-2012, 06:41 PM
  #15
Started
I read the title and just thought "arnt they all" ;)
     
    11-14-2012, 09:20 PM
  #16
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by Casey02    
I read the title and just thought "arnt they all" ;)
Not at all - look at Confucius's signature line quote from Ray Hunt!
     
    11-14-2012, 09:40 PM
  #17
Showing
You need to get it thro your head that this bond you speak of doesn't exist. You may feel bonded to him but he certainly doesn't with you. Sure you bring him goodies and that's what he wants. A horse that is truly bonded will leave other horses to be with you, of his own free will. It will trust you won't hurt it if it doesn't understand what you are asking it to do. He is a herd animal and your mare represents security to him, you don't, which is why he doesn't want to get too far away. I'd bet money he was sold because he started rearing when he didn't want to enter the arena.
     

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