Parelli - worth the money??
 
 

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Parelli - worth the money??

This is a discussion on Parelli - worth the money?? within the Natural Horsemanship forums, part of the Training Horses category
  • Parelli money
  • Parelli level 1 worth it?

 
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    01-11-2011, 11:42 PM
  #1
Foal
Parelli - worth the money??

I really want to develop a good horse/owner relationship with George (and want Jasmine to have the same relationship with him). I've been doing all kinds of research online, and have been watching training videos etc. on youtube. I've sought out advice from you all, plus other people that I've come into contact with about horses.

Can I learn natural horsemanship LIKE parelli students do ... just by following the advice I receive and from learning using the research tools I've come across. OR should I spend the money and sign up with the parelli savvy club?
     
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    01-11-2011, 11:46 PM
  #2
Showing
Hi Julie.
If you search "Parelli" in this forum, you will see many, many threads on the subject. Many are locked. It's a highly controversial subject here.
In my opinion, your money is MUCH better spent having in-person training. The problem with DVDs is that you aren't getting feedback. You could be doing something 90% right, and not get the desired response because you don't know what the 10% piece that's missing is.
There are lots of threads on the topic, though, and I don't want to get into another argument. I am happy to PM you my thoughts and opinions, and provide you with links to some reading if you would like.
     
    01-11-2011, 11:51 PM
  #3
Showing
No, it's not IMHO. I truly think it's cheaper and much more beneficial to find a good trainer to work with both of you (lessons). Plus (as already mentioned) DVD won't tell you if you ride/work correctly.
     
    01-11-2011, 11:51 PM
  #4
Green Broke
Oh don't open up that kettle of worms LOL!

It's really up to you & whether you think it is worth the money. My friend's really into that style of stuff (though she tweeks some of his ideas to fit her views on training) and she signed up for it.
If you're new to Parelli (or similar training) i'd start off small. Buy the book, maybe watch a few YouTube videos first to see if you like it.
Alot of people think they have to do every step the way they're told to in the books/videos, but I use it more as a sort of guide (i take some ideas and apply them where I see fit/needed.)
Then again, i'm happy with the relationship I have with my horses. It's not perfect in the "natural-horsemanship" way, but we get along great & they listen very well (in my eyes anyway! Lol!).
     
    01-12-2011, 12:03 AM
  #5
Showing
Quote:
Originally Posted by lilruffian    
use it more as a sort of guide (i take some ideas and apply them where I see fit/needed.)
This is very true - and very true of EVERY training method out there. Learn from a method, and take what you can from that method, and learn some other methods. No one method is going to work for every horse, and having LOTS in your "horsey toolkit" is going to be beneficial to you.
     
    01-12-2011, 12:10 AM
  #6
Banned
Well, the word "Parelli" will cause a lot of heat here on this forum. Some will say he is the equine devil, and others will swear by his every word and action. I don't know very much on the Parelli method, so I don't care either way for him or his wife's training techniques.
~~~

Personally, I would look into finding a trainer, a riding instructor, or an experienced horseman to help you out. It's easy to learn what you are supposed to do, but actually carrying out the task can be challenging.

In personal exerience, I always thought I was the isht when it came to horses. I watched all the hollywood horse movies, I read countless books, and took G-d knows how many pony rides at the carnivals/ fairs. Heck, I even rode an elephant when I was three, I "knew" everything about horses.

Then I started taking lessons. It turns out keeping your heels down is a lot easier said than done. And knowing the difference between the cantle and pommel didn't do squat for me when I started learning to trot and lope a horse.

The reason the transfer from paper to practice is so hard is this: 1. Every horse/person is different and 2. You may not understand the entire consept to begin with. Just like every person is an individual, every horse has its own way of thinking. Just because you can replicate everything the man did in the video/book down to the tiniest detail, doesn't mean it is going to be the perfect approach for George. And yes, there are going to be instances where you aren't going to understand entirely what the author/filmmaker is saying, but you can't ask questions to the book/video and magically get the exact answers you are looking for. This is where another more experienced horseman becomes invaluable. They can tell you ways to adjust you techniques so George understands, and you can ask questions to them, and get the answers you are looking for.

Don't get me wrong, videos and books can be REALLY helpful to you. You can learn a training technique or a different way to ask for a responce you hadn't thought of before. They will broaden your resourses for training and working with your horse. But, having somebody there to guide you in your learning process will make it that much easier to understand what you are learning.

Hope this helps!!!
     
    01-12-2011, 12:14 AM
  #7
Yearling
I think it does more harm than good. The " I want a better bond" Is the gimmick that sucks in so many teens thinking their pwetty lil ponez will love them.

I like Clinton Anderson's methods or Chris cox.
     
    01-12-2011, 07:28 AM
  #8
Trained
Get a trainer to help you, watch lots of different NH type trainers as mentioned above, and take and use what works for you. Noone (even PP, lol) has all the answers. (I just don't think he knows that yet....hehe)

**The real test will be Road to the horse next month!**
     
    01-12-2011, 08:01 AM
  #9
Banned
Another vote to get yourself a real live trainer. JDI put it well, someone there that can see the other 10%.
     
    01-12-2011, 02:43 PM
  #10
Weanling
If you are interested in Parelli, try to get your hands on one of the older Level 1 kits. Since they recently released a new Level 1&2 package, you may be able to find the older ones for under $100.

I wouldn't recommend the Savvy Club until you know if you like the program, because it could be expensive if you end up not liking it. You can't learn from the savvy club dvd's alone--the Levels are the base of the program and the savvy club helps with specific issues, such as trailer loading and such.
     

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