Parellis take on grazing while riding - Page 2 - The Horse Forum
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post #11 of 51 Old 08-23-2013, 07:51 PM
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it's up to you. Do you want to always be answering the question "may i?" or do you want to be over and done with it and never have that discussion muddying up the waters.?
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post #12 of 51 Old 08-23-2013, 07:55 PM
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I personally don't let my horses graze under saddle or even when I'm leading them. When they're with me, they're working. They spend the other 23 hours a day grazing. I also only have grass to work on, so I wouldn't any more distractions or confusion when I'm lungeing or doing groundwork.
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post #13 of 51 Old 08-23-2013, 08:55 PM
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My horses don't even know that's an option. I never let them & they never try.
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post #14 of 51 Old 08-23-2013, 09:08 PM
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I think of it more as a disciplinary thing- they should know better than to unseat a rider or stop in their tracks to graze- at a halt waiting on trailriders to catch up or taking a break i will let them graze- i sometimes go out in a halter and have no problems with grazing since i let them graze- they dont get to make that decision i make it for them as the leader.

When i ride a horse thats got issues with stopping to graze i just dont let them and it kind of stops that problem.

I agree with there being an time where its OK and a time where its not- thats up to rider not horse- thats where all horse respect issues happen- riders letting horses get away with what they want when they want instead of making calling the shots.
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post #15 of 51 Old 08-23-2013, 09:13 PM
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On a trail ride when I have him in a rope halter....he knows it is OK as long as you don't break stride.

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post #16 of 51 Old 08-23-2013, 09:19 PM
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I always allow grazing and have never had any issues with it (for the last 13 years or so). It is very helpful with barn-sour horses who do not enjoy trails if you let them eat at the farthest point before you turn around.

It seems to help nervous horses "relax" as they are not so worried about everything that is going on around them.

I do not ride consistently and I ride by myself a lot. I might trail ride once every 3 months or so, sometimes every 6 months, sometimes less than that. I want my horses to enjoy going out, and I do not want to worry about spooking or separation issues. The grazing always makes it a happy experience and my horses love to go out.

I've never had any issues with them pulling on me or refusing to put their heads up. In general, they will grab a bite and keep walking. My horse's are sensitive so I never have to get after them.

When teaching a weanling to leave the yard by themselves, I always hand walk and allow them to graze. I think it is important to get them out and about at a young age. With babies I do carry a whip in case they get in my space or get nippy. My trainer taught me that method, and always had great success with her babies. This way they get exposed to traffic, dogs, and everything else! By the time they are 2 yr olds, they are easy to trail ride as they have already had so much exposure.

I don't know why people view it as such a bad thing.
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post #17 of 51 Old 08-23-2013, 09:22 PM
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I want my horses thinking about the job at hand not where the next mouthful of grass is coming from.

I DON'T LEAD 'EM AND FEED 'EM, I RIDE 'EM AND SLIDE 'EM.
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post #18 of 51 Old 08-23-2013, 09:56 PM
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I never under any circumstances let my horses graze whether we are riding, tacking up, grooming, round pen work, whatever. If I am involved there is no eating under my time clock. Period. If I hang hay for them then that is one thing but I dare them to go for some grass.

I have seen people unseated due to a horse lunging for grass or a mouthful of whatever. I have also seen a horse run a girl under a low tree limb for grass on the side of creek bank.

I cannot stand repetitive behaviors like that. Its like someone tapping an ink pen on a desk to me. It drives me up the wall. I will not tolerate a horse reaching out to grab this or that with me onboard or while I am leading them. If they are doing that then are not focused on me and that is a no no.

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post #19 of 51 Old 08-23-2013, 10:28 PM
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Originally Posted by toto View Post
I think of it more as a disciplinary thing- they should know better than to unseat a rider or stop in their tracks to graze- at a halt waiting on trailriders to catch up or taking a break i will let them graze- i sometimes go out in a halter and have no problems with grazing since i let them graze- they dont get to make that decision i make it for them as the leader.

When i ride a horse thats got issues with stopping to graze i just dont let them and it kind of stops that problem.

I agree with there being an time where its OK and a time where its not- thats up to rider not horse- thats where all horse respect issues happen- riders letting horses get away with what they want when they want instead of making calling the shots.
My horses are my transportation around the hood. Sometimes, we ride over and visit the neighbor with the llamas. Sometimes we visit the nice lady with the herding dogs that bark and bark. As we ride and visit. we also stop and pick up garbage, get the mail (on horseback!) and other fun chores. My horses know when we are working and moving, and when we are stopped and they are on a break. Then, they can graze. As soon as I shift my weight to move off, they are already lifting their head and moving.

My friend's horse has a problem with eating when he should not, so he is not allowed to unless I tell him its okay.

I think it depends on what you do with your horse, and what you need from them at that moment. As long as they respond properly, they get the privilege.
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post #20 of 51 Old 08-23-2013, 11:00 PM
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Horse making decision to stop and eat; no way!
If my horse can grab a nibble and not break stride, okay.

We allow them to graze at some locations that we stop to talk and take a break only.
When I barely lift my reins my horse pops his head up and waits for instructions.

I would take this horse through very tempting grazing areas and correct this at a walk or trot.



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