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Parellis take on grazing while riding

This is a discussion on Parellis take on grazing while riding within the Natural Horsemanship forums, part of the Training Horses category

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        08-24-2013, 12:32 AM
      #21
    Showing
    My horses don't get to eat with a bit in their mouth....period. It doesn't matter if I'm leading them, riding them, or they are standing ground tied, they aren't allowed to eat.

    I need them focused on the job at hand, not scanning the ground for the next available bite.

    I have a horse that has been a bear to keep from eating under saddle from day 1. I don't know if it's just a strange personality quirk that is singular to him or if it might be because he's a mustang...I just don't know. The one thing that I do know is that if I allow him even one bite while I'm riding without correcting him, he turns into a monster about eating with every step...to the point that he completely stops paying attention to everything around him, including where his own feet are at. He nearly went down on me once because we were going down a steep hill and he dropped his head to get a bite and tripped.

    Now, because it's the only thing I've found that even remotely works on him, whenever he even thinks about taking a bite while I'm riding him, he gets a spur to the ribs. He's gotten much better now that he only tries a few times a year, but I know that if I allowed it even once, I'd have the monster back again.

    When my horses are saddled, this is the only time they are allowed to "graze"; with the bridle removed.


         
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        08-24-2013, 12:38 AM
      #22
    Weanling
    I trail ride in a hackamore and am training my mare that pressure on her neck means she can graze. So far so good, no bad habits. She is generally respectful about moving along when I tell her.
         
        08-24-2013, 01:35 AM
      #23
    Weanling
    I will occasionally stop and let Rio have a bite to eat. I view it as a bit of a rest and a reward for him doing a good job. I use pretty short reins with him so I have to lower them a lot so he can get his head at the ground. He knows if we're stopped and I lower the reins he's allowed to graze. When I lift the reins he easily moves along with no hassle. We use a hackamore and I like that he's able to eat easily with it.
         
        08-24-2013, 03:22 AM
      #24
    Weanling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Wallaby    
    Everybody starts out with the same "you get AWAY and stay away from that hay when I ask! I don't care what you're doing, or how hungry you are, I'm telling you that's my hay" rule though!
    Hey, Wallaby, do you mind me asking how you get that effect? My horse is very pushy around feeding time (it's a struggle each time to make him hold still while I take his halter off if there's grain in the stall). So far I've just been blocking him and giving him a "Hey!" when he tries to duck around me, but he only lets up for a split second and I usually call it a victory when he looks away for a second. I would looove it, though, if he would stand like a sane horse until I give him the ok rather than weaving around me like a demented boxer. Should I just do it "bigger"? Is there a danger of really scaring him if I react really strongly if he gets pushy (I mean as in yelling, making noise, chasing him away, of course, not hitting him)? I have a pretty passive/non-confrontational type of personality, so being "lead mare" isn't natural for me. I have to have rules and tips to follow
         
        08-24-2013, 09:37 AM
      #25
    Super Moderator
    "Excuse me Mr. Parelli, but my horses are 'trained' horses and they do not 'lunge forward' to grab a bite of grass. Perhaps if you taught your followers to actually 'train' their horses instead of just playing games with them, they would not be unseated by their horses lunging for a bite of grass!"

    The way you get a horse to stop being pushy when you lead him into a stall is to jerk the stuffing out of him if he moves while you are removing his halter. Jerk him hard and back his butt into a corner and make him stand there for a minute or two. Any time he moves, jerk again. If he moves again when you try to remove it, jerk him again. He will finally just stand there at attention and let you remove it completely. Demand respect and you will get it. Most horses do not volunteer more respect than you demand.
    franknbeans, Wallaby and smrobs like this.
         
        08-24-2013, 09:59 AM
      #26
    Green Broke
    Sometimes I'll let them eat when we are out. Mine are also kept on a dry lot, and I figure the fresh forage is good for them. However, they only eat on my terms and move off when I tell them. It's the same way at feeding time also. If I tell them to move away from the hay then, they do.
         
        08-24-2013, 11:32 AM
      #27
    Started
    I have the rule of "When there is a bridle on, you are working". So, no eating or goofing around. This would apply to riding or driving. I think this sends a clear message to the horse on how he should behave with equipment on. Not only that, but grass can get tangled around the bit as well.

    Now, I'm sure there are special circumstances.....long hacks where they need to have a nibble or two and rest. You could always enforce the no eating with a bridle there too by having a halter on as well and taking off the bridle to rest.

    But, over all, no eating with equipment for me.
         
        08-24-2013, 12:04 PM
      #28
    Yearling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by COWCHICK77    
    I want my horses thinking about the job at hand not where the next mouthful of grass is coming from.
    I've been dealing with this issue and giving a pretty firm no when Sam tries to steal a bite on trails. As we are approaching a 2% slope down a soft footed trail I want his attention on me and his feet. If he is chewing he is not engaged worse yet is if he tries to eat on the descent. He tried to steal a bite and lost his balance. That's when I decided it was against the rules.

    I went from asking. If he attempts to graze he gets a single rein pop.
         
        08-24-2013, 01:41 PM
      #29
    Weanling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Cherie    

    The way you get a horse to stop being pushy when you lead him into a stall is to jerk the stuffing out of him if he moves while you are removing his halter. Jerk him hard and back his butt into a corner and make him stand there for a minute or two. Any time he moves, jerk again. If he moves again when you try to remove it, jerk him again. He will finally just stand there at attention and let you remove it completely. Demand respect and you will get it. Most horses do not volunteer more respect than you demand.
    Thanks, I will try this. I am usually very reluctant to do the jerking, but I guess FG makes the most sense here.
    Posted via Mobile Device
         
        08-24-2013, 02:02 PM
      #30
    Green Broke
    My horse is not allowed to graze while I am riding. To me, it's just a matter of respect.
         

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