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Pony too desensitized to lunge! :(

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    11-15-2010, 01:10 AM
  #11
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by mom2pride    
On a lunge line you can't have a horse circle "out" to change directions, or he will wrap up in the line. So not sure what you mean here...

Another case in point, I don't WANT a horse showing me his hindquarter...his hinder is for defense, and I don't care how "kind" he is, that needs to stay away from me unless I 'want it' near me (like brushing, or handling his hind feet...but even then, he doesn't get to swing it toward me.
Oops, forgot to elaborate. I walk out to my horse and walk them in a circle out away from my space, then walk back to the center. I generally have to fix the lunge line to go in the other direction anyway, so I have to walk out to them.
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    11-15-2010, 01:12 AM
  #12
Started
Lol but what do you do if your pony decides that the grass is more important than being tapped etc with the lung whip and carries on eating :L
     
    11-15-2010, 01:52 AM
  #13
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by HollyBubbles    
lol but what do you do if your pony decides that the grass is more important than being tapped etc with the lung whip and carries on eating :L
Well before I even consider lunging a horse, or teaching him to lunge rather. He will know that when I ask him to move his feet, to move his feet NOW. I have almost always had to work in grassy areas, and that's not a problem if the horse truly understands that YOU control his feet. I don't attempt lunging a horse until he backs out of my space willingly, yields his hips and shoulders, and does simple sending exercises between a fence and myself; this is an EASY way to teach the beginning stages of lunging to a horse! Get him to go foward and through a smaller space between you and a fenceline for example, and get him to yield to you, and send him back through the other direction...I also teach them to go over objects using sending exercises.
     
    11-15-2010, 01:56 AM
  #14
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by riccil0ve    
Oops, forgot to elaborate. I walk out to my horse and walk them in a circle out away from my space, then walk back to the center. I generally have to fix the lunge line to go in the other direction anyway, so I have to walk out to them.
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Ahh, okay...that's how I was initially taught how to lunge (way back when), and then I discovered I could accomplish the same thing quicker, and easier by getting the horse to yield to me using body language, haha. As far as the lungeline, I will start with it coiled, and drop a coil each time the horse goes around and out in the circle, when I want him to stop and change directions I slide my hand up the rope, change hands and send him through, I leave the excess rope on the ground behind me...I think I'm just used to it being there, so I never find myself tripping over it and it makes it easy to give and take lead from the horse without fumbling the line.
     
    11-15-2010, 02:02 AM
  #15
Started
Quote:
Well before I even consider lunging a horse, or teaching him to lunge rather. He will know that when I ask him to move his feet, to move his feet NOW. I have almost always had to work in grassy areas, and that's not a problem if the horse truly understands that YOU control his feet. I don't attempt lunging a horse until he backs out of my space willingly, yields his hips and shoulders, and does simple sending exercises between a fence and myself; this is an EASY way to teach the beginning stages of lunging to a horse! Get him to go foward and through a smaller space between you and a fenceline for example, and get him to yield to you, and send him back through the other direction...I also teach them to go over objects using sending exercises.
I will be trying that lol, although I have a feeling its going to take a long long time to get a 38" miniature horse to yield etc. She knows how to lunge and can do it on dirt its just funny to see she thinks she's to good to work on grass. She's been better lately though. Leading/riding (i don't ride her im to big, little sister does) she doesnt even think about putting her head down. Lunging is a different story lol.
     
    11-15-2010, 05:21 PM
  #16
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by mom2pride    
On a lunge line you can't have a horse circle "out" to change directions, or he will wrap up in the line. So not sure what you mean here...

Another case in point, I don't WANT a horse showing me his hindquarter...his hinder is for defense, and I don't care how "kind" he is, that needs to stay away from me unless I 'want it' near me (like brushing, or handling his hind feet...but even then, he doesn't get to swing it toward me.
Yes yes yes. If I'm working a horse (especially a horse I don't have a solid foundation under with a healthy respect for my space) and they allwo their hind end to come within reach of my lunge whip you had better belive they are going to get a smack on the rump! I won't chase them down, but if they are close enough for me to contact them, that is what they will get. It teaches them to stay out of your space pretty fast.
     
    11-16-2010, 02:12 AM
  #17
Foal
Unhappy

Quote:
Originally Posted by riccil0ve    
It's not that he's so good at leading, or he's so desensitized. He simply doesn't know what you want. Get him on a lunge line and chase him off. Be firm, no half-hearted attempts and then being flattered that he doesn't want to leave you. Send him off, keep your arms out to the side and really drive from behind. Keep the circle small and walk with him. Praise like mad when he's doing good. It's also a good idea to teach him to stay out when you are done as opposed to him walking into the middle. And when you change directions, circle him to the outside. The middle of the circle is YOUR space.
Trust me- he knows exactly what I want. There is no way to even scare him away. Im certainly not halfhearted when I try to send him off! I'd have to post a video for you to understand that he will not go away from me whatsoever no matter what I do. I've been trying for a good year!

Someone else mentioned I should look away when trying to drive him away. That might be a good idea lol
NOTHING will make him go away from me- he just follows me. I use up way more energy than he ever does LOL! Im not having any progress. Another person talked about possibly having someone walk him in a circle around me- we've done that and he started to do it...im going to have to get that friend back over here to help! Lol. Thanks for all the answers and ill keep everyone posted :)
     
    11-20-2010, 05:27 PM
  #18
Foal
Take your stick or whatever it is you're using and drive the front end away. Hit the horse toward the top part of his neck 6" or so back from the head. Start off with a tap and keep tapping him,slightly harder and slightly harder, till he gives that first tiny hint of moving away, and then stop with the stick or whatever. Point the direction you want him to go, and tap with the other hand. And yes, you might have to hit slightly harder each time, before the horse to realize he needs to move. I'm not saying hitting abuse type hitting. Just hard enough to get the job done. He'll catch on quicker when you release the pressure (stop tapping) after he gives the try. Just remember to point, and stop tapping when he does the right thing, no matter how small the try. Start small and work your way up. You may even have to tap his jowl area a few times to get that head going the right way. Once he understands what it is you want him to do, he'll be on his way. Then you'll have to do the other side. It might be easier, it might be just as tough to get him moving. Be patient, remain calm, and reward the smallest of tries.
     
    11-20-2010, 05:41 PM
  #19
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by riccil0ve    
Oops, forgot to elaborate. I walk out to my horse and walk them in a circle out away from my space, then walk back to the center. I generally have to fix the lunge line to go in the other direction anyway, so I have to walk out to them.
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What? I disagree with that. You have the horse change directions to the inside of the circle. It should be one fluid motion. He's trotting to the left, he does a roll back to the inside, and is now trotting off to the right. You cannot direct the horse when he's going away from you, it's one sure way to get his attention off of you. Turning his butt to me is disrespectful. If you're doing this correctly, there is no need to fix the lungeline. I want this horse to eventually go from the lunge line, to free lunge, and go from a walk/trot/canter, do a roll back, and go the other way, for as far as I want him to go, before I ask for a change of directions again.

You start off slowly teaching to lunge both ways, then slowly teach the roll back, and to go the other way. Eventually you build on that, till it's one solid fluid motion, at the walk, then the trot etc. From there you can walk all over the place getting your horse to do this. Eventually farther and farther away from you, and eventually without a lunge line.
     

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