A Sudden Realization! (Bareback and Bridleless) - Page 5
   

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A Sudden Realization! (Bareback and Bridleless)

This is a discussion on A Sudden Realization! (Bareback and Bridleless) within the Natural Horsemanship forums, part of the Training Horses category

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        06-19-2013, 08:52 AM
      #41
    Super Moderator
    Good post Cherie
    In most of these things the problem is that there are holes (sometimes huge ones) in the horses training - and often the riders too if they haven't been taught how to properly correct these things or get them right in the first place
         
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        06-19-2013, 09:14 PM
      #42
    Trained
    I love any flexible bit, gives you a lot of feel and makes the horse happy. Both the bits Muppet and Bsms posted are wonderful bits.
         
        06-25-2013, 10:31 AM
      #43
    Yearling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Skyseternalangel    
    How exactly do you woah your horse? If you are just hauling on his mouth, that may be why he doesn't work well in "any" bits.
    Half halts.
         
        06-25-2013, 10:33 AM
      #44
    Yearling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Cherie    
    This tells me all I need to know. When someone is doing flying lead changes using a direction change and 'figure 8s', I know the rider does not ride at a very high level and lacks the skill to teach 'collection'. They also usually try to change leads by 'gunning' a horse into them which causes the horse to dread lead changes and/or speed up when they know one is coming. When horses start speeding up on lead changes, I know they have been 'gunned' into them and they have been pulled on in a futile effort to maintain a slower speed. They are also usually gunned forward when they change in front only -- something that most of the horses 'trained' in this way usually do.

    The idea that a curb is better or worse for a horse or that snaffle should always be the bit of choice is absurd. It is the person holding the reins and not the bit that causes ALL of the problems. Some horse prefer one bit to another and school better and easier in one kind of bit or another, but it is ultimately the hands on the reins that cause the problems. A good trainer can ride a well trained horse in a spade or halfbreed bit while a lousy rider will not find ANY bit, with or without shanks, that the horse trusts their hands while wearing it.

    I live in the heart of 'cowboy' country and have yet to see one start a colt in a curb bit. All of the 'cowboy' trainers that I know start them in snaffles or sidepulls. All of them also progress from a snaffle to a curb by going into curbs with swivel or 'loose' shanks that still allow two handed riding. Quite a few go into bits with hinged ported bits with bushings that also allow two handed riding. Personally, I really like them as do most of the horses I have put them on.

    You just cannot compare bits if you do not take into consideration the skill of the hands using them. A crude, rough handed rider is not going to find a bit a horse will work well in while a very skilled rider can probably ride the same horse in about any bit with some being more effective than others for training and teaching.
    He was taught collection when I originally taught him flying lead changes. I haven't used them in a while, so now he avoids the cue by speeding up. I'm reworking what my cue is by my bareback and bridleless riding
         
        06-25-2013, 10:38 AM
      #45
    Yearling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by alexischristina    
    I was about to post, but Cherie said everything so well that I'm not sure I'd make any sense in comparison OP, it sounds like the tack isn't the issue so much as your riding. It sounds like you could really benefit from some good lessons, going back to the basics and getting that horse you used to ride back.

    I will not go back to lessons. Never. I have been riding for 10 years, and many of the older people that watch me ride, applaud my style and communication. I had an eventing trainer, but she up and quit without telling me, until I found out she moved states away. I know the basics. I know quite extensive knowledge on more advanced riding. A few weeks ago, I rode in front of a saddleseat trainer who trainers national level arabs, and she automatically offered me a job to train and show her arabs, purely because of how I ride. Last week a different lady watched me ride bareback and bridleless, and I soon got a phone call of her wanting me to work with her horse. I don't think it's my riding at all.
         
        06-25-2013, 10:40 AM
      #46
    Yearling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by bsms    
    This is what I've been using with Mia, which sounds like what Cherie was writing about:





    Each side moves thru 45 deg of motion independent of the other side, and each side can also swivel out away from the face. If you look at in the horse's mouth, the initial pull on a right rein will put pressure on the right bar of the horse's mouth independent of the left side. Pull on both at once, and it acts like a traditional western curb. It looks to me like it has about 1.5 times in leverage, which is fairly mild for a curb bit.

    If Cherie is talking about something else, I apologize and will be curious to see what she meant.

    With Mia, I keep the curb strap on the loose side, but I don't know if that is a good idea. It seems to work OK as a direct rein, although I'm trying to get Mia used to one-handed riding, neck reining and listening to leg. If I bump on the reins, it gets her attention - but I'm trying to avoid doing that except for emergencies. If the only time I bump the reins is for a leg in the cactus, then it will be a very gentle approach to riding!

    For the OP: Do you have any pictures or video? It might help give folks ideas.

    If you look up HesUltimatelyFine on youtube, I have videos on there. I will have more recent ones soon when I get back from vacation.
         
        06-25-2013, 02:51 PM
      #47
    Trained
    I tell you what...If you said you were never going to lessons to my trainer, she would boot you out so fast and never let you on one of her horses. I have been riding with her since I was a toddler and showing for her for many years, and she still asks that when it's time to go to a show I come ride with her. Myself and another girl don't do it as often anymore because there's new riders, but it will never fade even if we won every major show on the circuit.

    That's all I really have to say...Still sounds quite arrogant to me...
         
        06-25-2013, 03:02 PM
      #48
    Started
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by KylieHuitema    
    I will not go back to lessons. Never. I have been riding for 10 years, and many of the older people that watch me ride, applaud my style and communication. I had an eventing trainer, but she up and quit without telling me, until I found out she moved states away. I know the basics. I know quite extensive knowledge on more advanced riding. A few weeks ago, I rode in front of a saddleseat trainer who trainers national level arabs, and she automatically offered me a job to train and show her arabs, purely because of how I ride. Last week a different lady watched me ride bareback and bridleless, and I soon got a phone call of her wanting me to work with her horse. I don't think it's my riding at all.

    Wow, that's a bit ignorant don't you think? You can always improve, but coach as been riding for way longer than you have and she still takes lessons, Olympic riders take lessons, most trainers take lessons. And sorry, but I doubt you have 'extensive knowledge on more advanced training'. Perhaps you've read about it? But it's very very difficult to 'self teach' concepts like that...
         
        06-25-2013, 03:03 PM
      #49
    Trained
    I'd like to know what qualifies as advanced riding to the OP.
    EvilHorseOfDoom likes this.
         
        06-25-2013, 03:05 PM
      #50
    Started
    Alright well, I've watched some of your videos and not to sound rude but I don't see a rider with such impeccable skill that trainers are dropping out of the sky begging you to work their horses. I DO see a rider with an okay foundation who could use some guidance to fix a lot of her issues, but I certainly don't see perfection
         

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