Thouroughbread? Basic tips/help?
 
 

       The Horse Forum > Training Horses > Natural Horsemanship

Thouroughbread? Basic tips/help?

This is a discussion on Thouroughbread? Basic tips/help? within the Natural Horsemanship forums, part of the Training Horses category
  • Temperment of tb rudimentary

 
LinkBack Thread Tools
    09-13-2010, 01:46 AM
  #1
Foal
Question Thouroughbread? Basic tips/help?

Iam planning on getting a horse.. I have been taking lessons for about 3 years but I still need some basic tips and help. Ok, I need some help choosing the perfect breed.I like to go fast on a horse, I hate dressage and would like to jump. What horse would suit me? I was thinking thouroughbread but what is your opinion? And please add some basic tips in your answer.. That would help!
Thanks.
     
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
    09-13-2010, 08:16 AM
  #2
Started
Welcome to the forum!

Will this be your first experience owning a horse? Based on your post, I'll (tentatively) assume that it is.

If so, don't worry about what breed to shop for. There are a lot of other qualities that take precedent over breed when choosing a first horse. I recommend shopping for temperament and experience first of all, with conformation a close third. At this point, here is a sort of "laundry list" of what I would look for in a first horse:

Sane (predictable, reliable, no major issues that have caused him to be passed from owner to owner)

Quiet (While a flightier, more nervous horse doesn't equal a bad horse, starting your ownership experience dealing with a constant bundle of nerves isn't the cup of tea of most new owners)

Vice-Free (No cribbing, weaving, pacing, etc. Steer clear of barn/buddy sour behavior, although that can develop at any time if it isn't headed off. Dealing with ingrained vices is difficult, and potentially expensive if you have to replace equipment)

Not a "Project" (Don't buy a horse that has a history of a behavior or medical condition that will need a lot of work or maintenance to bring him/her up to soundness/workability. No chronic buckers/rearers, etc., and do definitely get a prepurchase exam by your vet before the final sale to make sure that there aren't any lurking medical problems that the seller was unaware of or failed to disclose)

Conformationally Correct (Doesn't have to be perfect breeding quality, but study up on confo and be able to recognize "fatal flaws" that may affect performance and health)

Some miscellaneous buying tips - take a knowledgeable horseman with you when you go to check out a horse. Your instructor, a horsey friend who has bought and sold horses before, etc. Another set of wiser eyes can be invaluable.

GET A PREPURCHASE EXAM! No matter what your budget is, you don't want to pay the seller, get the horse home, and the next morning have him come up dead lame from something that could have been caught on the PPE. Use your own trusted vet! Don't blindly accept the sellers' vet's word, or accept a pre-printed PPE. The horse should pass the PPE to within your expectations, and have current vaccinations and test results.

Visit a prospective purchase at least twice before buying. Definitely test ride, but do have the seller "show" the horse first. If the seller won't get on the horse, or won't display any ability that the horse is advertised to have, red flags should be flying.

If you come to a point when all of the above criteria have been satisfied, and you're choosing between several "good" horses, and you still have a breed preference, then take that into consideration. When buying a horse, color is the last thing to think about. Breed is the second to last unless you are very intent on showing a specific circuit. Thoroughbreds can do all that you listed in the OP, but so can many appendix QH's, sport-bred paints/appies, large ponies (depending on your height, of course), warmbloods, Arabs, and the million and one good crosses and grades for sale. If you're long term goal is upper-level competition, don't forget that a less-than-ideal breed can be eventually handed down to a novice and you can level up to a more suitable breed/type down the road as you gain experience.

Sorry, that got rather long, e-cookies if you read it all! Good luck in your horse search!!
     
    09-13-2010, 10:02 AM
  #3
Green Broke
Agreed with Scoutrider who wrote an excellent post, shop for temperament and conformation. Just one tip for you though - you may be in for a surprise if you hate dressage but love to jump - dressage will be the foundation of your jumping!

Also, if this is your first horse and you really are set on a TB, I would avoid ones that have been raced as 3 years of lessons probably hasn't quite set you up for retraining a racehorse..... yet. There are some lovely TB's out there but you have to be careful and really know what to look for. Bear in mind also that TB's are the type of breed that generally require regular work - are you able to ride several times a week? If not I would look for a breed that will be OK with only being ridden on weekends and occasionally through the week. If it is a first horse, I would look for something that is 8-12 years old as a guide. Of course there are younger horses that are exceptional in temperament and training, they can be hard to find and you have better chances of finding a reliable horse that you can enjoy if they have several years of good riding under their belt (girth?!).

Good luck!
     
    09-13-2010, 10:28 AM
  #4
Weanling
Take your time. Look around there are a lot of horses for sale.
Try to stay away from buying from emotion.(Hope that makes sense)
Buy one that is trained and does NOT need more training.

And no one gives a good horse away, good horses still bring good money.

I cannot count how many horses I have ridden for people(trying to fix problems) that they told me they had this connection with their horse, a bond. But couldnt ride them.

Problems do not go away, they only become manageable.

Good luck!
     
    09-13-2010, 10:44 AM
  #5
Showing
Quote:
Originally Posted by nobody2121    
And no one gives a good horse away.
Incorrect.

I have a fabulous TB gelding who was given to me for zip, nada, zilch. Sane, sound, conformationally correct, and a total sweetheart.

I knew going in that he was trained for nothing except racing and would have to be retrained as a pleasure horse, but he has been the easiest, most tractable animal I've ever known.

There's nothing wrong with him temperamentally or soundness-wise. He just happened to not want to race, and his trainer/owner wanted him to go to a good, one owner home.

If you know what you're looking for and are willing to take on an animal that might need some retraining, there are plenty of them out there for the taking.

As a first horse though, a fully trained or retrained animal, regardless of breed, is the best bet for a noob.
     
    09-13-2010, 11:04 AM
  #6
Weanling
I wouldn't look for a breed specific, look for the actual experience and ability. Everyone here posted fabulous answers ! :) keep us updated and DON'T buy a horse out of pity.
     
    09-13-2010, 12:19 PM
  #7
Started
Quote:
Originally Posted by nobody2121    
And no one gives a good horse away, good horses still bring good money.
Agreed with SR on this. My sister's horse was given to her by a family friend. He's a registered QH, well-bred, conformationally correct, with a tremendous work ethic, and was in his very early teens when he was given to her. His only problem was that he's cowhorse-bred and looks it, and the previous owner wanted at the time to get into WP more competitively.

Of course, it's good to have a healthy "what's the catch?" sense. For every excellent deal there's bound to be a few lemons.

There are deals to be had, its just a matter of being in a position and taking the time to recognize a deal vs. a dud, and to prioritize what is or should be important to you in a prospective purchase.
     
    09-13-2010, 12:38 PM
  #8
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by Speed Racer    
Incorrect.

I have a fabulous TB gelding who was given to me for zip, nada, zilch. Sane, sound, conformationally correct, and a total sweetheart.

I knew going in that he was trained for nothing except racing and would have to be retrained as a pleasure horse, but he has been the easiest, most tractable animal I've ever known.

There's nothing wrong with him temperamentally or soundness-wise. He just happened to not want to race, and his trainer/owner wanted him to go to a good, one owner home.

If you know what you're looking for and are willing to take on an animal that might need some retraining, there are plenty of them out there for the taking.

As a first horse though, a fully trained or retrained animal, regardless of breed, is the best bet for a noob.
Ok, I have not seen anyone give a good horse away!
Myself if I have a good horse why would I give him away after all those hours!
For me good horse maybe different then others, one for a beginner.(could go on hope you get the idea)
     
    09-13-2010, 12:42 PM
  #9
Showing
Quote:
Originally Posted by nobody2121    
Ok, I have not seen anyone give a good horse away!
Myself if I have a good horse why would I give him away after all those hours!
For me good horse maybe different then others, one for a beginner.(could go on hope you get the idea)
If you go broke, farm on foreclosure, and you have no money to board (and no market to sell) then I'd think some people do. I've seen such ads although not very often.

To the OP, as people already mentioned get something already trained if you don't have experience training. It'll save you lots of headache (and money too in long run).
     
    09-13-2010, 12:46 PM
  #10
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by kitten_Val    
If you go broke, farm on foreclosure, and you have no money to board (and no market to sell) then I'd think some people do. I've seen such ads although not very often.

To the OP, as people already mentioned get something already trained if you don't have experience training. It'll save you lots of headache (and money too in long run).
Thats my point, if I am broke and have a good horse, people will want him and willing to pay something! Why give hime away.
When I sold my last Bridle Horse I had people lined up to buy her.
     

Thread Tools

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
BASIC first aid supplies Tasia Horse Health 5 02-14-2010 08:05 PM
Basic Tips?? luvmyperch Driving 16 11-07-2009 04:06 AM
a few basic questions dreamrideredc Horse Health 5 08-16-2009 06:13 PM
Basic Dressage Rurusmylove Dressage 2 07-20-2009 08:00 PM
Basic care...? manhirwen Horse Health 23 07-09-2008 04:56 PM



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 10:37 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0