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Trick training gone wrong

This is a discussion on Trick training gone wrong within the Natural Horsemanship forums, part of the Training Horses category

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        09-13-2013, 05:42 PM
      #61
    Trained
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Cherie    
    I have seen a few horses that were trained by entirely different methods to entirely different cues. No one else could do anything with the horse.
    Agreed. I am a BIG proponent of teaching STANDARD CUES and training standards to all horses so that they can look forward to something of a happy life after they change owners again.
    I wish there was a survey to tell everyone the average # of owners a horse has in his lifetime. =/
    Ironically, I am the 3rd owner of all three of my current herd.
    As a perspective, when I bought "Tyke" (15yo, QH/TWH, 1970-1998, RIP), all of the other 7 owners contacted me to see him. Go figure.
         
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        09-13-2013, 06:21 PM
      #62
    Started
    Cherie - that's a great question "how can you find a new home for a clicker trained horse".
    This is why my clicker trained horses are taught to respond to pressure cues. I use non-escalating pressure to cue the skill I want, c+t to reinforce it. The clicker is only used to teach the skill, not used for all eternity. When a skill has been learned you can either reduce the reinforcement or you can increase the criteria of the skill. Like asking for a more collected or extended trot rather than just a trot. I never stop training my horses, I'm always CTing for something new, but other peoppe ride my other horse and the rescues I train without using CT. The skill has been taught, the horse knows what's expected of them. My horses are taught to respond to all sorts of tack options, bits, bitless and no tack. I expect them to listen 100% of the time, food or not, the rewards are just used to teach the new skill or reinforce a skill that may be lacking.
         
        09-14-2013, 11:02 AM
      #63
    Super Moderator
    I'd never heard about clicker training until quite recently and I'm the sort of person that would normally 'pooh pooh' that sort of thing but it was suggested to me when my traditional methods weren't going as well with Looby as I normally expect (she came with a catalogue of issues) so it seemed like I had nothing to lose by trying it
    I've been amazed at the change in her attitude and how fast and how well she responded to it - As each obstacle is overcome and the learning or acceptance established I slowly remove the CT and just use the traditional cues that I was using alongside the CT
    I now have a pretty much normal horse instead of one that would go into hyper panic mode at the slightest hint of pressure to do something she felt she wasn't happy with.
    I've since tried it out on all my horses with new learning things or stuff they had always had small phobias about and been impressed with how well its worked
    PunksTank likes this.
         
        09-25-2013, 04:53 PM
      #64
    Foal
    Hmm, so is this bad behaviour then too? Hee hee. I loves me some sloppy horse kisses.

         
        09-25-2013, 05:00 PM
      #65
    Showing
    Yeah, that'll be loads of fun when he decides to take your face off with those teeth. Hee hee.
    Cherie, DimSum and Nokotaheaven like this.
         
        09-25-2013, 05:17 PM
      #66
    Foal
    Oh! He would NEVER do that! He also bows for treats.
         
        09-25-2013, 05:32 PM
      #67
    Yearling
    I have a Great Dane who knows plenty of tricks, and when she gets excited about food her paw along with those nails start flailing for hand shakes and high fives to get her treats. She's scratched me pretty good. Needless to say, I wouldn't teach my horse to flail his teeth and heavy head at my face to get a treat. Spanish walk, bow, smile.. Those would be okay. But hand shakes, pawing, kisses, and rearing I probably wouldn't.
    Posted via Mobile Device
         
        09-25-2013, 08:28 PM
      #68
    Started
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by LovesMyDunnBoy    
    I have a Great Dane who knows plenty of tricks, and when she gets excited about food her paw along with those nails start flailing for hand shakes and high fives to get her treats. She's scratched me pretty good. Needless to say, I wouldn't teach my horse to flail his teeth and heavy head at my face to get a treat. Spanish walk, bow, smile.. Those would be okay. But hand shakes, pawing, kisses, and rearing I probably wouldn't.
    Posted via Mobile Device
    I use CT to teach my horses everything they need to know but I would not teach anything like a spanish walk until the horse is on solid stimulus control (only providing skills when asked) a horse pawing the air all the time is just obnoxious and when not asked for can be dangerous.
    Personally I teach my horse first to stand quietly with their head forward. The first and most heavily reinforced skill you teach will be what your horse goes to when they don't know what to do. Then I teach them to touch a target with their nose. I always use an object on a stick at first, like a crop with a star at the end or something. Never have them target your hand or face or body until you know how they escalate a skill (biting or pawing or knocking around) and have taught them when and when not to do those things. For example my pony kicks a ball when its on the ground, without the ball pawing is ignored and useless to him. When an object has a handle he should pick it up and play fetch. If the ball is hanging on the wall he shouod bang it around. If he touches my hand he should touch gentle and never escalate. But until you have the timing to reinforce each skill for each situation its best not to ever set them up to make a mistake.
         
        09-25-2013, 09:24 PM
      #69
    Green Broke
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by danny67    
    oh! He would NEVER do that! He also bows for treats.
    I think this would be a good topic for a betting pool. Is that legal? We could each pick a date when Danny67 is going to get bit and who ever comes closest wins the jackpot. But we would have to trust that Danny would tell us.
    My horse is a nibbler and communicates a lot with her lips and I trust her fully but I would never even think about letting her do this near my face.
    NdAppy likes this.
         
        09-26-2013, 01:01 AM
      #70
    Foal
    LOL. 'ol Drift is in horsy heaven now. In my 14 years with him he was always a good boy and never bit. He was just a slobber king. Those kisses were fun except when he had been nosing in the poop pile.
    tinyliny likes this.
         

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