Why even use a bit? - Page 4
 
 

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Why even use a bit?

This is a discussion on Why even use a bit? within the Natural Horsemanship forums, part of the Training Horses category

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        10-09-2012, 09:40 AM
      #31
    Showing
    When I trained and showed my mare we used three bits. The snaffle was for general schooling at home. The curb was when we were working on western pleasure. The hackamore was games. In time she knew the difference. She learned that with the hack we were going for speed. At the show some mixed up pleasure/trail classes with games and she transitioned well with the bit changes.
         
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        10-09-2012, 09:44 AM
      #32
    Showing
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Sandi B    
    I have had my horse for little over a year I think he also sensed that I hated him having a bit in his mouth.
    Stop anthropomorphizing your horse. He has absolutely no clue that you hate bits, based on reading a children's book back when you were young and impressionable.

    I also don't know where you read in Black Beauty that bits are horrible and cruel, because I've reread it multiple times and never came away with that idea. Checkreins and overchecks when they're done to the point of the horse not being able to get their head down yes, but bits? Nope.

    If YOU don't want to use a bit, then don't. Just stop with all the soppy sentimentalism about how bits are so cruel and horses HATE them. Neither assumption is correct. What horses hate are ham fisted riders who yank on their mouths. If you don't have the finesse or training to ride bitted without hurting the animal, that doesn't make the tool at fault.

    Besides, bitless bridles aren't easy and gentle either, in the wrong hands. They put pressure on sensitive areas of the horse's face, jaw and poll, and if the pressure is too hard it HURTS. So much for bitless being 'gentler' than bits.

    I've had horses for 34 years. None of mine have ever been traumatized because I use bits.
         
        10-09-2012, 09:44 AM
      #33
    Green Broke
    Sandi, it doesnt sound like dyslexia, sounds more like dyspraxia which is a lack of coordination.

    Before you start claiming you have it though it is best to get it officialy diagnosed.
    Dyslexia is diagnosed by an educational psycologist not a doctor.
         
        10-09-2012, 09:47 AM
      #34
    Showing
    If dislexics wear a watch or bracelet always on the left arm can this not help them realize left from right. A teacher yesterday mentioned that years ago he'd given the 6 dislexic kids in his class watches to always wear on "that" arm and to remember that it was the left hand. He said it made a huge difference for the kids.
         
        10-09-2012, 09:47 AM
      #35
    Foal
    I give up, I was just trying to celebrate my small success. Thank you very much Faye for telling me of dyspraxia, I am looking it up now.
         
        10-09-2012, 09:52 AM
      #36
    Green Broke
    Yes you can use visual cues to help with dyslexia, whilst some struggle with the concept of left and right, dyslexia itself does not affect coordination, dyslexia is however often found in conjunction with dyspraxia but they are 2 distinct conditions with different symptoms and different coping mechanisms

    I personaly paint the nails on my left hand a different colour to those on my right (currently cream on the right, blue on the left). I also have an addiction to coloured pens, this is a classic sign of dyslexia as it is a coping mechanism, different colours help enormously!
    Sandi B likes this.
         
        10-09-2012, 09:59 AM
      #37
    Showing
    When I taught children to ride of course they wanted the saddle, bridle, like in the movies. I'd put the snaffle bridle on and the child would mount in the ring. Horse wouldn't move. I would explain to the child he doesn't trust that their hands might pull too hard, that it would hurt his mouth. I'd then switch him to a flat halter and he was good to go. Usually about the third or fourth lesson we'd try the snaffle again. The child would be thrilled as she recognized her advancement in hand skills.
    PunksTank likes this.
         
        10-09-2012, 10:23 AM
      #38
    Trained
    Sandi B, if your horses perform better for you bitless, go bitless. There is nothing cruel about going bitless if your horse feels confident and happy and responds to you well. But I wouldn't celebrate it as an achievement, because it doesn't mean you've done something special. Maybe you read Black Beauty, but your horse didn't. Maybe using a bit made you feel angry or tense, and horses DO sense a tense, angry, frustrated rider. So by all means, feel free to go bitless if it works for you!

    But that doesn't mean it gets the job done for all riders on all horses on all types of riding. Take a good look at post #23. Some horses will work cows without taking it personally. Some horses take a much more aggressive approach. My gelding will try very hard to do what someone wants. He is an extremely submissive horse. But he is more confident he is doing what his rider wants when he has a bit in his mouth, and that extra confidence helps him to relax. Mia is more high-strung. She was sold to me as perfect for a beginner, but she wasn't and isn't. If we go 50 yards without my messing with her mouth somehow, her head comes up and her ears turn back as if to say, "Are you still there? Are you awake? Are you taking care of me?" And if I take some slack out of a rein or use my seat to ask her for a different speed, she calms down.

    She is an 11 year old horse with a lot of deep seated fears. We're working on that, but it takes a lot of time. I rode her for 3 years without a bit, and now ride her with one. She is more relaxed and confident with a bit than without. So should I celebrate achieving bitted riding with her?

    Well, in a sense, yes. Anytime you figure out a way to make your horse more relaxed and confident, THAT is cause for celebration. But I'd honestly feel a bit silly if I boasted that my horses now use bits. I might as well boast that my horses now have saddles that fit...

    Mia with a bit, on a trail. SHE has pulled her head around and put tension on the outside rein. Does she look like a horse in pain? Is "Chestnut Beauty" suffering?



    Hint - given the stiffness of my lower back, I'm the only one feeling pain in this picture...
    Speed Racer likes this.
         
        10-09-2012, 10:32 AM
      #39
    Trained
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Saddlebag    
    If dislexics wear a watch or bracelet always on the left arm can this not help them realize left from right.
    Yes and no, if you tell me "away from my watch" or "toward my watch" I'm there, 100% turn on a dime, tell me "turn left" I have to look and check which side my watch is on, process the thought that there is my watch, my watch is on my left hand, turn toward my watch, *sigh* by then the moment has passed
    natisha and Sandi B like this.
         
        10-09-2012, 11:04 AM
      #40
    Green Broke
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by bsms    
    Sandi B, if your horses perform better for you bitless, go bitless. There is nothing cruel about going bitless if your horse feels confident and happy and responds to you well. But I wouldn't celebrate it as an achievement, because it doesn't mean you've done something special. Maybe you read Black Beauty, but your horse didn't. Maybe using a bit made you feel angry or tense, and horses DO sense a tense, angry, frustrated rider. So by all means, feel free to go bitless if it works for you!

    But that doesn't mean it gets the job done for all riders on all horses on all types of riding. Take a good look at post #23. Some horses will work cows without taking it personally. Some horses take a much more aggressive approach. My gelding will try very hard to do what someone wants. He is an extremely submissive horse. But he is more confident he is doing what his rider wants when he has a bit in his mouth, and that extra confidence helps him to relax. Mia is more high-strung. She was sold to me as perfect for a beginner, but she wasn't and isn't. If we go 50 yards without my messing with her mouth somehow, her head comes up and her ears turn back as if to say, "Are you still there? Are you awake? Are you taking care of me?" And if I take some slack out of a rein or use my seat to ask her for a different speed, she calms down.

    She is an 11 year old horse with a lot of deep seated fears. We're working on that, but it takes a lot of time. I rode her for 3 years without a bit, and now ride her with one. She is more relaxed and confident with a bit than without. So should I celebrate achieving bitted riding with her?

    Well, in a sense, yes. Anytime you figure out a way to make your horse more relaxed and confident, THAT is cause for celebration. But I'd honestly feel a bit silly if I boasted that my horses now use bits. I might as well boast that my horses now have saddles that fit...

    Mia with a bit, on a trail. SHE has pulled her head around and put tension on the outside rein. Does she look like a horse in pain? Is "Chestnut Beauty" suffering?



    Hint - given the stiffness of my lower back, I'm the only one feeling pain in this picture...
    Isn't your horse a bay? What were you both looking at? She's very pretty & looks happy too.
         

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