why shake the leadrope to back your horse explained - The Horse Forum
 17Likes
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
post #1 of 34 Old 01-03-2012, 01:34 PM Thread Starter
Foal
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Princeton, Illinois
Posts: 149
• Horses: 0
why shake the leadrope to back your horse explained

I've seen this question come up a bunch of times, and it seems most people don't understand why this is taught to horses. Shaking your horse back has a practical purpose, it comes from Vaquero horsemanship which is the foundation of NH. It's essential for when you're doctoring cattle. Here's a picture where I'm working on a calf with my horse. I'm holding the calf down, you can see my horse has stepped up to give me slack in my lariat, the dark rope is my mecate lead that's part of my reins. I need the rope loose so I can get the loop end off the calf's head and put it on it's front feet. You don't want the rope on his neck more than you have to and when you're done you can let him loose and he'll simply kick the rope off. So once I have the front feet in the loop I shake my mecate rope and my horse will backup and retighten the lariat for me. That's where shaking them back comes from, I'm holding the calf so I can't get up and back my horse. Also if the rope gets a little loose and the cow tries to kick free that will shake the rope and my horse will step back and make it a little tighter.

Posted via Mobile Device
Mike Zimmerman is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 34 Old 01-03-2012, 02:29 PM
Trained
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: Germany- but not German =D
Posts: 5,151
• Horses: 2
Hmm that's interesting! I was always taught NOT to shake a rope at a horse but I'm an English rider and have no need to rope cattle ;D
Posted via Mobile Device
DuffyDuck is offline  
post #3 of 34 Old 01-03-2012, 02:46 PM
mls
Trained
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: MN
Posts: 5,464
• Horses: 3
Maybe practical for that purpose but not for 99% of what an every day horse person needs to do with their horse.

For instance, a tie down roper wants their horse to back until the pressure is tight on the rope. That would be highly impractical and even dangerous in other areas of horse handling.

I step into my horse, he backs. If I need him to back (such as out of the trailer or tie stall), I simply say 'back'.
mls is offline  
post #4 of 34 Old 01-03-2012, 02:51 PM
Green Broke
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: ~*~ NEBRASKA ~*~
Posts: 4,367
• Horses: 5
I actually have taught Cinny both methods and have found uses for both methods. I ride Dressage. I like the versatility of being able to tell him more than one way if I have to. I have also taught him to come close to me with a couple different commands as well.
Northern likes this.
Cinnys Whinny is offline  
post #5 of 34 Old 01-03-2012, 02:54 PM
Super Moderator
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Seattle, WA
Posts: 39,700
• Horses: 2
That's interesting. I never gave it a thought, but that explanation is very elegant.
tinyliny is offline  
post #6 of 34 Old 01-03-2012, 03:02 PM
Showing
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Missouri
Posts: 16,846
• Horses: 1
That's very interesting.. I like hearing and learning about how things are what they are, especially to do with older methods of ranching and whatnot.

Quote:
Originally Posted by mls View Post
Maybe practical for that purpose but not for 99% of what an every day horse person needs to do with their horse.

For instance, a tie down roper wants their horse to back until the pressure is tight on the rope. That would be highly impractical and even dangerous in other areas of horse handling.

I step into my horse, he backs. If I need him to back (such as out of the trailer or tie stall), I simply say 'back'.
I agree.

Though I've spent all this time teaching my horse to stand still and trust the handler and those around him.. I don't want him mis-interpreting a shake of the rope to back. I prefer to voice it or use my body language.

Like I said in another thread, a parelli handler was trying to teach my horse to back (he was just showing me how any horse is trainable to the methods) and my horse got very frightened and very confused then frustrated and he backed, but it was more like a shuffle where he was leaning on his hinds rather than stepping. I don't dislike the shaking of the rope, I just didn't find it very helpful.

Maybe one day we'll try it again, but right now I have no need for it. I'm very open to trying new things with my horse :)
Skyseternalangel is offline  
post #7 of 34 Old 01-03-2012, 03:43 PM Thread Starter
Foal
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Princeton, Illinois
Posts: 149
• Horses: 0
Quote:
Originally Posted by mls View Post
Maybe practical for that purpose but not for 99% of what an every day horse person needs to do with their horse.

For instance, a tie down roper wants their horse to back until the pressure is tight on the rope. That would be highly impractical and even dangerous in other areas of horse handling.
The horse does keep it tight, once you back them up until the slack is out they'll hold it tight as long as you need.
Posted via Mobile Device
Mike Zimmerman is offline  
post #8 of 34 Old 01-03-2012, 03:50 PM
Super Moderator
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: Riga, Latvia
Posts: 5,651
• Horses: 1
My horse was taught to back up by shaking the rope, but, as the four phases were used, he now backs up if I just raise a finger and say "back up!" if necessary - as a warning that I will start shaking the rope with my palm in a couple of seconds.

But the origins of the rope shaking is a very interesting fact to know, thanks!
Sonja likes this.

I have come a long way, to surrender my shadow to the shadow of my horse.
/James Wright/
Saranda is offline  
post #9 of 34 Old 01-03-2012, 03:53 PM
Showing
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: MD
Posts: 23,907
• Horses: 2
It was interesting to read, Mike. However I still don't get why you have to shake it to basically whack the horse's jaw with it like some NH trainers do (not saying every trainer does/teach it this way)?

I also think mls brought some good points.

"Life isn't about waiting for the storm to pass: it's about learning to dance in the rain..."

"When we are no longer able to change a situation - we are challenged to change ourselves."

"How people treat you is their karma; how you react is yours."
kitten_Val is offline  
post #10 of 34 Old 01-03-2012, 03:53 PM
Yearling
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Scotland
Posts: 1,444
• Horses: 1
It's a handy wee trick to have if you're ever in a situation where you need to be operating a gate, have the horse in one hand while holding onto something else, or some other sort of multitasking activity. Also useful for awkward bloody gates where if you had to move your body into your horse to get it to step back out of the way, it would be even more awkward. I just wiggle the rope at my horse and say "back" and back she goes.

Edit: There was no "whacking" to teach her this. She already knew how to back and I just attached the wiggley rope to my other back command (stepping towards her chest) until she understood the meaning of the wiggley rope and would back off the wiggley rope alone. Easy. And not traumatic at all.

Last edited by thesilverspear; 01-03-2012 at 03:56 PM.
thesilverspear is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the The Horse Forum forums, you must first register.

Already have a Horse Forum account?
Members are allowed only one account per person at the Horse Forum, so if you've made an account here in the past you'll need to continue using that account. Please do not create a new account or you may lose access to the Horse Forum. If you need help recovering your existing account, please Contact Us. We'll be glad to help!

New to the Horse Forum?
Please choose a username you will be satisfied with using for the duration of your membership at the Horse Forum. We do not change members' usernames upon request because that would make it difficult for everyone to keep track of who is who on the forum. For that reason, please do not incorporate your horse's name into your username so that you are not stuck with a username related to a horse you may no longer have some day, or use any other username you may no longer identify with or care for in the future.



User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in









Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.


Old Thread Warning
This thread is more than 90 days old. When a thread is this old, it is often better to start a new thread rather than post to it. However, If you feel you have something of value to add to this particular thread, you can do so by checking the box below before submitting your post.

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Riding with Halter & Leadrope? Almond Joy Horse Riding 18 01-27-2012 11:02 PM
Horse Colors Explained: Lesson 1 CrazyHorseArtist Horse Colors and Genetics 13 05-26-2011 09:34 PM
How do I stop him biting the leadrope? apachewhitesox Horse Training 9 02-21-2011 07:10 PM
Leadrope for a Bad Leader Piper182 Horse Tack and Equipment 5 07-02-2009 05:31 PM
Horse Spooking Explained bthny158 Jokes and Funnies 2 09-14-2007 06:00 PM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome