Will Parelli calm him down? - Page 2 - The Horse Forum

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post #11 of 34 Old 07-13-2011, 07:57 AM
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I am interested in hearing more about this vet. It is Acepromezine (sp) the vet is talking about? Not some kind of natural supplement called "ace"?
I don't understand tranq, and riding any horse. Maybe some natural herbs.
Usually a change in diet can help, if a horse is that "high" he may need some adjustment to the feed.
Just a suggestion. Wish you the best. Susan

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post #12 of 34 Old 07-13-2011, 01:36 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by Alwaysbehind View Post
Do not know your horse history. Is this horse coming back from an injury?

In those situations, I think riding (light hacking obviously, not training rides) on Ace is completely acceptable.
Not really. He is still in training after being put out to pasture for 5 years right after he came off the track. However he seems to be prone to just about every health issue a horse can have...he's currently lame with thrush, so no need for the Ace right now.

And Susan, I don't really know. I'll check tomorrow. My parents bought it and my trainer keeps it in the feed room. I've actually never seen the bottle, they give it to him for me so by the time I get there it's kicked in.
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post #13 of 34 Old 07-13-2011, 01:41 PM
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I guess I would have to agree with the other then. If your horse is sound for lunging or such I do not see any reason for acing before riding.


To clarify what I said before, Ace is sometimes needed (and to me acceptable) if your horse has been on a long term layup and their issue/injury recovery does not allow them to be on turn out or lunged prior to their riding starting again (and we all know the riding starting again means days and days and days of just walking).

A little drugs can go a long way to keep horse and rider safe in that situation.

I am not sure why you need it to hack for a horse that can be lunged or turned out.
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post #14 of 34 Old 07-13-2011, 01:48 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by xxEmilyxx View Post
Not really. He is still in training after being put out to pasture for 5 years right after he came off the track. However he seems to be prone to just about every health issue a horse can have...he's currently lame with thrush, so no need for the Ace right now.

And Susan, I don't really know. I'll check tomorrow. My parents bought it and my trainer keeps it in the feed room. I've actually never seen the bottle, they give it to him for me so by the time I get there it's kicked in.
On thrush note, how are you treating that? From experience, thrush should not be able to take sufficient hold to cause lameness, unless a) neglect -which I'm sure is not the case here, or b) it's indicative of general weak hoof STD irises and strength.

If you are treating it externally which I presume you are, can I strongly recommend that you use a non-necrotising solution. Nothing bleach based etc. All they do is leave lots of dead tissue for bacteria and infections to take hold.

You can buy Oxychlorsine over the counter in the US if that's where you are based? If so get some, and use a long boot or even a taped feedbag to soak it in the solution for 45 minutes. Then remove the solution (you can use on another foot for another 45 mins) and cover with an empty bag to allow the vapours to absorb. The differential pressure of the long soak boot will really help drive it into the pores and any cracks etc. One soak should usually be enough except in extreme cases when another a week later will be used.
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post #15 of 34 Old 07-13-2011, 06:25 PM
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It's not about Parelli or any other approach. It's about work, patience and consistence. Parelli may work for you, or may not work for you. In any case if he's healthy and you are unsure about riding I'd start working with him on ground. You may work him out first (like lunging) and THEN bring to the grooming area (when he's calmer and more focused on you).

BTW, you can start adding calming supplements to his diet to quiet him down a bit.

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post #16 of 34 Old 07-13-2011, 07:22 PM
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Parelli will absolutely help out your guy :) If you go to Parelli's website, you can read up on the Horsenalities. To me he sounds like a "right brained extrovert" so if you look that up on their website, you will immediately have strategies for that particular horse that you can start using right away.
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post #17 of 34 Old 07-14-2011, 10:24 AM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by Doe View Post
On thrush note, how are you treating that? From experience, thrush should not be able to take sufficient hold to cause lameness, unless a) neglect -which I'm sure is not the case here, or b) it's indicative of general weak hoof STD irises and strength.

If you are treating it externally which I presume you are, can I strongly recommend that you use a non-necrotising solution. Nothing bleach based etc. All they do is leave lots of dead tissue for bacteria and infections to take hold.

You can buy Oxychlorsine over the counter in the US if that's where you are based? If so get some, and use a long boot or even a taped feedbag to soak it in the solution for 45 minutes. Then remove the solution (you can use on another foot for another 45 mins) and cover with an empty bag to allow the vapours to absorb. The differential pressure of the long soak boot will really help drive it into the pores and any cracks etc. One soak should usually be enough except in extreme cases when another a week later will be used.
Well I hadn't been out to the barn in about a week and a half. We just didn't have time to get out there in the morning because my parents work, and it rained almost every afternoon. And anyway, I drizzle bleach into the cracks and let it dry. Then I put on ThrushBuster. And then before I turn him out I put on some of this "liquid bandage" that keeps the moisture from getting in and him getting it on any other hooves.

Thank you for the input. Soak for 45 minutes though? I can hardly get him to soak his foot for 2 minutes...
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post #18 of 34 Old 07-14-2011, 10:52 AM
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Well bleach and thrush buster are a bad idea. Both are necrotising so what you are doing is killing good tissue with bad, and leaving a further source for infection and fungus.

Thrush buster used to contain gentian violet, iodine, formalin, formaldehyde and tannic or citric acid (for hardening). I'm not sure what it contains these days as some of those components are now restricted, but I'm pretty sure it's still necrotising.

You don't have to soak for 45 minutes but that helps. Alternatively an ionic silver spray will kill any infection, bacteria and fungi within 10 seconds of contact. It is non-necrotising and completely safe too. Then I would use some sort of medicated clay to try and provide a barrier. However with thrush you have to remember it relies on moisture and a lack of air. As such clean dry is your best ally where possible.

Is your horse shod?
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post #19 of 34 Old 07-14-2011, 11:43 AM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by Doe View Post
Well bleach and thrush buster are a bad idea. Both are necrotising so what you are doing is killing good tissue with bad, and leaving a further source for infection and fungus.

Thrush buster used to contain gentian violet, iodine, formalin, formaldehyde and tannic or citric acid (for hardening). I'm not sure what it contains these days as some of those components are now restricted, but I'm pretty sure it's still necrotising.

You don't have to soak for 45 minutes but that helps. Alternatively an ionic silver spray will kill any infection, bacteria and fungi within 10 seconds of contact. It is non-necrotising and completely safe too. Then I would use some sort of medicated clay to try and provide a barrier. However with thrush you have to remember it relies on moisture and a lack of air. As such clean dry is your best ally where possible.

Is your horse shod?
Oh okay. That's really helpful to know! And he is not shod.
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post #20 of 34 Old 07-14-2011, 11:50 AM
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As Kitten said, it really doesn't matter the method, your horse needs more training, period. I would strongly suggest working with a trainer in-person rather than trying to work off a set of DVDs.
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