Is it wrong to give your horse a pat? - Page 4
   

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Is it wrong to give your horse a pat?

This is a discussion on Is it wrong to give your horse a pat? within the Natural Horsemanship forums, part of the Training Horses category
  • Touchy, feelyl, horse butt
  • Touchy, feely, horse dock / tail

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    03-19-2013, 10:40 AM
  #31
Green Broke
All of our horses accept pats as praise or greeting. Most non-horsey people tend to do it like you would to a dog. I would hate for a horse to flip out because of it. Better to get them accustomed to it just in case.
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    03-19-2013, 10:46 AM
  #32
Showing
Mine much prefer rubs and scratches to pats. Old habits die hard but I also consider patting as a form of desensitizing. Your horse will enjoy a scratch around the withers, just in front. That's a popular grooming sight for them.
     
    03-19-2013, 10:58 AM
  #33
Weanling
I usually pat my horse, but he knows the difference, hard hit means he did something bad, and the thing with Ben, he knows when he is doing something bad. If he nips at me he does it then jumps back out of my reach or chews on his rein and then once I turn around he spits it out. If I walk to the tack room, he will start to walk out of his stall, and as soon as I come out he backs back into it. He's a dork! Anyway he likes to be rubbed but I typically just lightly pat.
     
    03-19-2013, 11:37 AM
  #34
Green Broke
I pat all the horses at the barn. Usually on the butt when I am cleaning or moving things as a "heads up, human behind you". I can't say any of them mind, half of them see me raising my hand and scoot their butt over.... pat my butt! Ooooh and then give it scratches and I just KNOW there's got to be treats in your pocket!

Horses aren't stupid, they know the difference between a smack of "Hey, get your butt over, NOW" and "Hey, I'm here and happy with you".
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    03-19-2013, 12:02 PM
  #35
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by xlionesss    
I'm scared of hurting someones feelings...even if she annoys the heck outta me. Maybe some people like her teachings, I'm just not a fan of unwarranted advice from someone who puts off the vibe she'll never learn another thing about horses in her life; as if she knows everything there is to know. Thats what really gets to me.
SIIIIIIIGH!! I wish I was more like you and a little more....delicate. Once I get irritated enough I lose all my filters. I have a lovely friend who is a Parelli-ite and while I have learned a lot of useful info from her, frequently all that touchy feely, ask don't tell stuff realllllly gets on my nerves. Usually right in the middle of somebody deciding to wear me out by being disrespectful. She has caught the rough edge of my tongue a few times (we've been friends since BEFORE anyone ever heard of Parelli) and she gets over it, though I don't know if your gal will. I tend to bark when I'm p.o.'d and people stand there and start spouting. I feel like since I didn't ask for their help, and 9 out of 10 times they're more distraction than help, then they just need to live with it when I bark at them to "F* OFF! When I have time for that cr*p I'll tell you. Otherwise, either man up and get in here and help or shut up and get out of my sight!". My friend has a pretty thick hide and can be a bit oblivious to MY warning signs so .... until I have actual ears to pin and a tail to swish, she's going to get verbally kicked.

And I guess that's the point I was trying to make. If you give unsolicited advice and butt in where you haven't been invited, then you get what you get and you better learn to deal with it.
     
    03-19-2013, 12:21 PM
  #36
Foal
I'm not overly affectionate with my horses, but I do pat/whack/scratch... Gets them used to it, and some horses seem to feel "complete" when they do a good job with some kinda of affectionate gesture (some don't care). I definitely don't do treats, except on rare occasions, and not as a reward.

Quote:
Granted, I don't go overboard and smack the s*** out of them like some folks you see, but I see nothing wrong with a decent pat occasionally.
.... My dad.... I could be working on the meanest, spoiledest, kickingest, brat of a horse, and it NEVER fails, at some point he will appear out of nowhere, directly behind the horse and WHACK, WHACK, WHACK seemingly as hard as he possibly can... And then proceed to roughly manhandle it in anyway possible. Never fails. And each time, the horses reaction is always: and nothing more.

I'm always cringing for impact of hooves to skull.

And somehow, my dad gets away with it. Every time.

(Considering every other unimaginably insane, unsafe, and just at times stupid stuff he manages to get away with, I am absolutely amazed he's still alive. He's 70 now... And in those years I swear he has learned absolutely no common sense about anything, lol... But, I love him, and am always prepared in standby mode to doctor him up or take him to the ER)
     
    03-19-2013, 12:26 PM
  #37
Started
You might try stepping back and landing on her foot...30 or 40 times. Or a heavy sigh and taking your horse and going back into the stall and shutting the door. I have been thoroughly enjoying some of the responses here. : )

In all honesty, you are going to have to set some boundries with her. It would most likely be of great benefit to everyone else in the barn. It's one thing to offer advice if someone has a problem and another thing to offer advice just because you think you are the smartest person on the planet. You aren't in any danger of being rude. She is the rude one.
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    03-19-2013, 12:27 PM
  #38
Yearling
I looooove patting my horse. And my dog, for that matter - both animals make great drums! She fully understands it's loving pats - it's when she gets a really good, solid whack and a stern (insert few words here) that she knows she's in trouble. I like to pat her butt when I brush her tail, or her sides. Play 'horse pat music' on her. She pricks her ears up and turns and looks at me all interested like "What are you doing back there?" Especially when I sing along to my drumming. It's like a big game. (obviously soft drumming. Not like, beating her or anything LOL)

Likewise, when she's being exceptionally good when riding, I lean up and give her some ear scratches/neck pats, and she pricks her ear up and obviously is pleased with herself.

If she showed any dislike I would stop, but she knows it means I love her. She sometimes gets neck/face pats after a good scratch, and she leans her head against me with her eyes closed. I'd say that a pretty surefire sign that she enjoys her pats ;) I think it's as everyone else said - each horse will interpret it differently, and they will TELL you what they think of pats.

And with the next topic - have you said anything to hover-lady yet? She doesn't even own a horse. She shouldn't even be there. :p
     
    03-19-2013, 01:01 PM
  #39
Green Broke
There is a difference giving a good pat and a pat to move over. Horses pay attention to the whole body language. You may not think you are different but horses can tell.
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    03-19-2013, 02:34 PM
  #40
Yearling
This thread pretty much sums up what I assumed LOL I'm just sick and tired of this lady acting like she can read the horse's mind. I'm waiting for the day she goes to pet him when I'm not there and he tries to take a chunk out of her acting like a friendly little human being...that's what I hate. That's why I don't let her "train" my horse...I feel like he'll overstep his boundaries with her methods.
     

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