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Acquired a horse...know NOTHING and scared.

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        10-28-2013, 08:22 AM
      #21
    Foal
    He put his companion through the fence last year and had to have her put down. Unfortunately, that's partially why the disdain for this guy now.

    Not going gung ho...simple math says I won't win. Lol I would just like him to be happier, to see a little more pride and confidence in his eyes, to be able to do SOMEthing with him. He's young, healthy, and beautiful, and I want more for him! I may or may not be able to give that to him. Hard choice.
         
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        10-28-2013, 08:29 AM
      #22
    Foal
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by NeryLibra    
    Well you have to remember that the ultimate decision is yours Dilly; a lot of us are just trying to keep you around to see a few more summers and inform you on why it isn't the wisest decision for a person in your position with a sincere but severe lack of knowledge that would do this horse any good. Considering the fact that he used to be a buggy horse, there's a good chance that he's been driven nuts by the lack of activity. Take any hard working citizen, give them a few consecutive years off, and sure they'll enjoy it. But some will go insane after xamount of time.

    If you decide that you truly want this horse, you've gotten the advice you need to stay on course and keep him. It's simply summed up to: find yourself a good trainer, get yourself hands on-and-off experience elsewhere, and leave him space until you're both in a better position to deal with each other. You most certainly wouldn't be the first person hell-bent on seeing a positive change in a damaged/unruly horse, and I know for a fact that you won't be the last. The difference is learning your limits before you get involved with a horse, especially one that's already displaying the "I control you therefore, get lost" behavior that you're describing.

    You need a confident, assertive trainer with a wealth of experience specifically related to what your horse is displaying that'd be willing to take him on. Which is a pricey, pricey thing depending on your situation, your horse's personality and problems, and of course how much you're going to be charged for the trainer's time. If you find the horse is worth it, then that's your choice.. you seem to have a good head on your shoulders. Take the decision seriously.

    What do you want to DO with this horse in the long run? If you want a pasture ornament, I'm not confident he's the horse for you. He's already suffering for it.
    What can you Provide for this horse to get him where you want him to be? You Need to provide the training if you plan on keeping him.
    What are you capable of doing for this horse, presently and in the future? From providing feed and the like to training and a safe home, you need to determine if you're a good fit for him as much as vice versa.
    How much money are you willing to put into him? Give yourself a figure.
    Who supports you in this endeavor? Will they keep that support rolling? Are you alone in this desire? (From the sounds of it, your partner certainly doesn't feel the same.) If you get involved with this horse are you going it alone or not?
    How will you determine you need to cut your losses? When is enough enough for you? When he physically hurts you? Drains your pockets? Gets booted out of the trainer's?
    Is it practical for you to keep him? Yes or no is your ultimate decision.

    Just some questions for you to consider.
    Long run? Ultimately, trail riding would be nice. For now, handling him without peeing my pants would be groovy. Yes, I'll be pretty much alone. Feed and safety isn't an issue. Injuries...I have to anticipate those. Clueless how to determine when to cut my losses since everyone else already has.
         
        10-28-2013, 09:01 AM
      #23
    Showing
    When next you take an apple, cut it into small slices. When he approaches the fence, don't offer the treat until his ears come forward. He will go thro various motions but just wait it out. Then hold the treat at arm's length more to your side so he doesn't associate your body with having treats. This makes him turn his head away to get the treat. Horse's aren't real fond of having their nose touched. A better place is between his eyes (often itchy) or his cheek. Always ears forward before getting the treat. When the treats have run out, walk away before he does. It's ok to do this 3 or 4 times a day to cement the idea into his head that only ears forward get the treat. Try this and let us know how it goes.
    jmike and Dilly like this.
         
        10-28-2013, 10:02 AM
      #24
    Foal
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Saddlebag    
    When next you take an apple, cut it into small slices. When he approaches the fence, don't offer the treat until his ears come forward. He will go thro various motions but just wait it out. Then hold the treat at arm's length more to your side so he doesn't associate your body with having treats. This makes him turn his head away to get the treat. Horse's aren't real fond of having their nose touched. A better place is between his eyes (often itchy) or his cheek. Always ears forward before getting the treat. When the treats have run out, walk away before he does. It's ok to do this 3 or 4 times a day to cement the idea into his head that only ears forward get the treat. Try this and let us know how it goes.
    Awesome. Concrete stuff I can use this day. Thank you!
         
        10-28-2013, 10:26 AM
      #25
    Yearling
    When you yield, you release pressure, when you release pressure you are training him that he is doing the right thing

    When you yield your space, you are teaching him that he is the boss over you --- THIS IS VERY DANGEROUS --- if a horse thinks he is the boss over you, he will pin his ears at you if he does not like where you are standing, if you do not immediately recognize the pinned ears, he may follow it up with more aggressive behaviour such as biting or kicking

    I agree with the others --- professional help is sometimes the best help


    I am a newbie, but those are the most helpful lessons I have learned here and I make it a point to keep those 2 things in my mind at all times when I am handling my horses

    One of mine was kicking at me when I would bring treats to the pasture and take turns feeding them (because SHE wanted more than she was getting) She turned, backed up a step, took aim, and tried to put both heels through my chest --- scary

    To correct that behaviour, I decided, it is MY food, I give it to them when I am ready. I carried a carriage whip with me at feed time, and would run them off until the feed was set down.

    If they pinned their ears at me, I would chase them away and snap the whip -- I would not actually make contact with them unless they pinned their ear AND stepped towards me

    They have since learned that when I am around and I have feed buckets, they respect my space and mind their manners.


    And Saddlebag -- wow -- that is awesome advice -- I will try that
         
        10-28-2013, 11:25 AM
      #26
    Green Broke
    Quote:
    There's something about his face; there's good stuff in there. That's why I'm hell bent. I have no interest in jumping on him or getting crazy, I just know he has to be miserably bored. I want him happy and I want to be able to at least socialize and interact with him.
    Well Dilly, in the words of a long-time horse friend of mine:

    "s**t fire and light matches" . I relate to that and emphathize because one of my four horses is like that.

    He's been with me 17-1/2 of his 19-1/2 years for just that reason.

    Everyonce in awhile, I would catch a glimpse of somebody really sweet in that 1,100 pounds of horse.

    He is disrespectful of women but he will listen to my 5'2" self because I will lace him with the buggy whip if he doesn't. Actually I haven't connected the buggy whip to him in a good 8 years; smacking the ground or the metal T-posts works every bit as well

    Three crucial things with my unruly/A.D.D. Horse:

    1. Diet. If he is on ANY SORT of grain or bagged feed, get him off of it "yesterday". That includes ration balancers because they have grain in them and they also have soy in them.

    Oats, corn and soy can make a horse nuts <---my horse in this post:)

    He should have vitmins/minerals but I would buy a quality brand that is condensed; meaning it only takes one ounce to two ounces for him to get his requirements.

    It could be mixed into STRAIGHT timothy pellets (no alfalfa for now) with a bit of water. Tractor Supply carries Standlee hay products. They are consistently high quality and not dusty.

    No apples no carrots -- sorry too much sugar. Treat him with a handful of timothy pellets if you feel the need:)

    Yes, I am asking you to feed this horse like he is insulin resistant BUT it's the diet my nut case horse is on and if you've ever seen A.D.D. Or overactive children at work, they behave a lot better without sugar in them.

    1.1 Lastly just for kicks because it's not that expensive: Buy AniMed's "Remission". Its primary purpose is to get magnesium into insulin resistant horses to keep their insulin under control.

    Remission Animed (Supplements - Hoof Builders) <--don't be mis-lead by the words "hoof supplement". This is some good all around stuff PROVIDED the horse is deficient and/or has high insulin levels; it seems to be a good health multi-tasker

    I learned by accident, last Spring, that my A.D.D. Horse (in this thread) must be magnesium deficient because the Remission caused him to have such an "about face" personality that even my little Arab allowed him to groom. The Arab has never-ever permitted that.


    This horse no longer has environmental allergies and I don't see his skin crawl anymore, the rain rot and big flakes of dandruff are gone and so are the Scratches every time it rains.

    2. Ever constant discipline, albeit these days we're down to verbal but, he still gets disciplined more than all of my Keeper Horses combined in the 53 years I've been paying for my own horses. It's just who he is.

    3. Chiropractor and a fantastic one. Male or female but to be good, they need a good "woman's instinct". I know you get that, even if you don't have children

    Horses do indeed have headaches that can make them blow up for no apparent reason. While that can be caused by a blow to the head, generally the cause is the Atlas bone in the head/neck area being out of place.

    If you really want to keep this fella, find someone to handle him while a highly qualified and very intuitive chiropractor examines him. Hopefully said chiro also knows acupuncture.

    If you keep this horse, yes you need somebody with a fair heart & mind and a lot of experience to help you. We can only offer so much, from afar.

    I wouldn't even be posting this post were it not for the fact that you sound like you've got more grit than six people and also enough common sense to over ride your emotions so you don't get yourself killed by this horse.

    His bad habits most assuredly need addressed and corrected but there's a reason why he's gotten this bad in the first place. A 12 year old horse just doesn't suddenly go off the deep end and run a herd mate thru the fence.

    Some THING has happened -- figure that out and you might be on your way to a decent horse -- you may never be able to totally turn your back on him but it sounds as if you're willing to deal with that if you can save him
         
        10-28-2013, 11:35 AM
      #27
    Yearling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by walkinthewalk    
    He is disrespectful of women
    all women or just the ones that do not handle him properly?


    Quote:
    Originally Posted by walkinthewalk    
    3. Chiropractor and a fantastic one. Male or female but to be good, they need a good "woman's instinct".
    what do you mean by "woman's instinct"?

    Just curious ... I am a guy and unsure of what that entails
         
        10-28-2013, 11:40 AM
      #28
    Yearling
    Anybody else feel the want to see pictures of this horse? :)
    EvilHorseOfDoom and kbg7506 like this.
         
        10-28-2013, 12:14 PM
      #29
    Teen Forum Moderator
    Walkinthewalk- the biggest problem I have with your post is that while your feeding suggestions are ideal, this is a thoroughbred and in my experience, they're sometimes notoriously hard to keep weight on. My TB filly would wither away into a pile of bones without any alfalfa, grains, or things like beet pulp or rice bran. She eats hefty amounts of alfalfa, jigs costal hay, rice bran, and a decent amount of grain every day and is still a little ribby at times. The alfalfa is what I've seen do the most for her. Many TBs just can't live off of grass hay, even if they eat to their hearts content. It also depends on the horse how they handle sugars. As long as I don't go overboard on my girl she's not hot at all. Sensative yes, but that comes with her breed. But she never feels so excitable that a quick reprimand can't calm her down.
         
        10-28-2013, 12:14 PM
      #30
    Foal
    No clue how to post pictures of him here. He isn't flashy, plain ol' bay, but his dayum eyes get me every time.

    It's sunny and beautiful here today, so I'll nab some new pictures shortly in case I figure out how to load em.
    EmilyJoy likes this.
         

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