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Acquired a horse...know NOTHING and scared.

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        10-29-2013, 03:44 PM
      #51
    Yearling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Dilly    
    Hi NorthernMama, and thanks. He's NOT nuts and he's not a monster. (A couple posts have morphed him into a fire breathing dragon.) It's ME that's clueless and being manipulated. There's training there somewhere, he's just been turned out for a couple years. Tied, he gets antsy and wiggly, but he's able to take care of his feet and the vet is able to check him. I'm the doofus in the equation.

    When I was scratching him yesterday, I walked away first, per advice in one of the earlier posts. HATED it cause I wanted to maul him for being sweet, but I walked. NEAT thing is, he stayed! He watched me almost all the way back to the house. AND I didn't have apples with me!

    Probably hokey, lame, and minor, but I'm calling yesterday a win.
    I think you should start a Member Journal about this! I would be interested to follow it and people would shoot you advice too. :) It'd be wonderful to track your progress. And show us pictures.
         
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        10-29-2013, 09:09 PM
      #52
    Foal
    I don't have any advice to give, but I'm following this thread. Like was said earlier, if he getting his feet tended too and vet checked, he's has some training. If there is a lesson barn near by, try taking a few lessons. Start with ground work. You need to know how to handle a horse on the ground before taking riding lessons.

    You're not the doofus, you're just not use to handling him. I was the same way a couple of years ago when I started taking lessons. And large horses totally intimidated me. What finally broke me from being so nervous around them was my instructor sending me out into the pasture alone, with about 20 other horses to get my lesson horse. I was sooo nervous and scared. But the closer I got to them and started to rub some of them, the calmer I got. It was amazing and now I'm not afraid to be around them. I use caution, but is not afraid nor intimidated by them. Now I have 2 horses, a 16.2h quarter horse and a 15.2h appaloosa.

    I wish you the best of luck with your horse and hope everything works out.
         
        10-29-2013, 09:23 PM
      #53
    Showing
    I think this is just a case of miscommunication. You have no clue how to communicate with him yet, so he's not too sure of you and thus wants little to nothing to do with you.

    In time when you begin to learn and apply what you've learned, you will start to bridge some communication gaps and start to form a relationship with this horse.

    But please... consider what gut stomping would actually feel like. It's one thing to say you'd do anything but it's another thing entirely to put yourself into a dangerous situation that COULD have been prevented if you weren't a freight train.

    Seriously, read up on horse basics. How they communicate, simple corrections, talk to people about how they correct x y z, there will be 10 different answers. It's up to you which one you choose to use at each particular time, and then it's your responsibility to deal with whatever response the horse throws at you.

    They will test you, because to them it's about survival and they need to know that you're one of the ones they should trust.

    I think keeping a journal would be good, that way you could ask questions and tell us exactly what steps you're doing with this horse. It's also a great way to track progress.

    Best of luck!
    jmike and Dilly like this.
         
        10-30-2013, 01:57 PM
      #54
    Foal
    Dilly, I just wanted to say that when my horse came into my life, I was a complete novice. I was not a horsewoman or a rider. Like you, my horse came into my life---I didn't go looking for her. We rescued one another & I mean that in every sense of the word. She was abandoned at the boarding facility where we board. I had heard stories about how she was a monster about picking up her feet (pretty true at first!), bucked her previous owner off & would bust through cross ties & run down the barn aisle.

    I did enlist the help of a trainer immediately & we proceeded very slowly. We actually sat down & talked about what I wanted out of the whole deal. I just wanted to be her caretaker. She was a big beautiful Belgian mare & I didn't care if I ever got to ride. I just wanted to learn to be safe around her & give her some kind of life outside of the pasture.

    Let me tell you, 2 1/2 years later, we're riding. We are learning dressage, believe it or not! And she is really good at it! We've just started riding outside of the ring & I hope to get into trails over the next few months (we have trails around the neighborhood where the boarding facility is). I NEVER expected to get this far. EVER! We did a year of solid groundwork. I was in no hurry. It paid off immensely. Be a leader. Be firm, but not aggressive or unfair (this was a hard one for me to learn because I felt like being firm with her was "mean". Now I know she looks to me to be the leader...). Be consistent.

    Today, this mare picks up her feet for the farrier (sometimes falls asleep during her trims!) & lets me do just about anything to her & gives her all to do whatever I ask under saddle. She's amazing & doesn't have a mean bone in her body. She just needed a human to be patient with her & to trust (& trust me, at the time, I needed a living being to be able to trust too!).

    You can do this & the pay-off is amazing. You just have to just be really patient & not have too many expectations & don't push too hard. And get some professional help to guide you along...my trainer has been a Godsend.

    Be safe & GOOD LUCK!
    Dustbunny, SammysMom and Dilly like this.
         
        10-30-2013, 04:19 PM
      #55
    Yearling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by JenniMay    
    Dilly, I just wanted to say that when my horse came into my life, I was a complete novice. I was not a horsewoman or a rider. Like you, my horse came into my life---I didn't go looking for her. We rescued one another & I mean that in every sense of the word. She was abandoned at the boarding facility where we board. I had heard stories about how she was a monster about picking up her feet (pretty true at first!), bucked her previous owner off & would bust through cross ties & run down the barn aisle.

    I did enlist the help of a trainer immediately & we proceeded very slowly. We actually sat down & talked about what I wanted out of the whole deal. I just wanted to be her caretaker. She was a big beautiful Belgian mare & I didn't care if I ever got to ride. I just wanted to learn to be safe around her & give her some kind of life outside of the pasture.

    Let me tell you, 2 1/2 years later, we're riding. We are learning dressage, believe it or not! And she is really good at it! We've just started riding outside of the ring & I hope to get into trails over the next few months (we have trails around the neighborhood where the boarding facility is). I NEVER expected to get this far. EVER! We did a year of solid groundwork. I was in no hurry. It paid off immensely. Be a leader. Be firm, but not aggressive or unfair (this was a hard one for me to learn because I felt like being firm with her was "mean". Now I know she looks to me to be the leader...). Be consistent.

    Today, this mare picks up her feet for the farrier (sometimes falls asleep during her trims!) & lets me do just about anything to her & gives her all to do whatever I ask under saddle. She's amazing & doesn't have a mean bone in her body. She just needed a human to be patient with her & to trust (& trust me, at the time, I needed a living being to be able to trust too!).

    You can do this & the pay-off is amazing. You just have to just be really patient & not have too many expectations & don't push too hard. And get some professional help to guide you along...my trainer has been a Godsend.

    Be safe & GOOD LUCK!
    i couldn't help it -- was a good post -- so I bolded a few things
    JenniMay and Dustbunny like this.
         
        10-31-2013, 05:49 PM
      #56
    Foal
    I know the feeling!! When I first got my current pony, I thought she hated me!! But she was probably more scared!!
    First of all, you should buy a horsemanship book, they're really helpful!
    Bring an experienced person with you, a riding instructor/trainer would do!! This horse could be seriously dangerous!! They can have a try at handling him. A trainer can work with him, but you be there every step of the way!
    When the trainer isn't around, sit outside the fence, but be wary at all times!!!! Don't make any sudden movements, just watch it, bring it treats, and show him that you're his friend, not his enemy!!x
         
        11-08-2013, 10:47 PM
      #57
    Yearling
    I'm wondering how things are going! I can't say too much about aggressive or unhandled horses because I've never really had one. All of my horses are generally good natured. I think the important thing is to know when to ask for help (and you did!) and to make sure that you are handling situations in the safest way possible for you.

    I'm not going to tell you to get rid of the horse because I bought a horse with little experience. I rode at a dinky lesson barn for 5 years, learned practically nothing, quit, and then a few years later, got my first horse. I bought him because he was very well mannered and calm. When I got him home, it was an entirely different story because I didn't know what I was doing. He'd bite, kick, do rear threats, take off towards home, throw major tantrums at the vet (vet actually asked if I was sure he was a gelding and not a mare lol) and would absolutely not load in the trailer.

    Through advice, reading, and trial and error, I found a way to make things right. You absolutely have to be firm and let the horse know that you are boss. Praise them when they are good, ignore or slowly correct irritating behavior, and most definitely correct dangerous behavior. I never wanted to hit my horse. Ever. But if I didn't smack my horse in the neck or shoulder or smack him with a crop, he'd still be biting and kicking. That being said, some horses are more sensitive and would respond with a yell of, "No!" or with making a buzzer like sound. But Rusty was a stubborn case, and because horses weigh about 1000 lbs more than we do, we have to protect ourselves first.

    Working slowly and surely will get you where you want to be. Rusty has learned to load in the trailer (though he is still a bit stubborn about it and doesn't enjoy traveling), has no major vices, and was a show horse for a year until he became injured and was no longer able to show. He's my best trail horse and my favorite ride. And he came with the most work.

    I think a persevering attitude is also noted to get you far.
         
        11-12-2013, 03:38 PM
      #58
    Foal
    :) I keep bopping back in and reading all I can in other threads.

    Midterms week hit and I got a little more tied up for a minute.

    Probably a standstill, but nothing more to report other than he's staying tolerant of my scratching on him and I'm walking away first. Staying with this, because I'm trying to read his moods better. Sometimes he acts like he wants me there and I make myself walk, other times it's a quicky and I have to haul out before he does because he just doesn't seem up for it.

    Still up in the air as far as our future and still digging for information from the two footed grump. Apparently, at one point, he was a great buggy horse and the interest in that feigned. I made a little progress in him offering to get the buggy back out if that's what I reeeeally wanted. Don't know that I'm the buggy type and the visual is kind of funny, but if it's an offer to help and do something with him, I'm game! It'll be a starting point in at least having someone else involved.
         
        11-12-2013, 06:43 PM
      #59
    Trained
    It's good that you are still staying connected with the horse. Is he looking for you to come now?

    As far as getting the buggy out, steer clear of that for the moment. A buggy horse is a whole different ball game and training must be 100% (or, you know, as close as we can get to that ) However, if the "two footed grump" is willing to help along that route, that would be super-terrific!
         
        11-13-2013, 01:36 PM
      #60
    Foal
    I thought a couple times he's actually looked like he was anticipating my coming over when I was out working the dogs. He was at the fence and intently looking at me without my speaking to him, ears forward, and turning to see where I was going. In my warped lil mind, I don't go over when he does that, thinking instead I should wait until he's out further again, then call him over. So that's what happens.

    Since the weather's broke, I have gotten brave enough to walk the hay into him instead of cutting the bailing wire and throwing it in in pieces. Lol So far so good.

    I have no intentions of playing with the buggy alone. That would be a him thing, and getting the horse working again. Crossing fingers.

    At this point, he has to stay for the winter and I'll make no decisions. The hay was great this year, so I know he'll have plenty to eat and be taken care of, verses sending him off with gawd knows who, feeding him gawd knows what.
         

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