Acting strange - The Horse Forum
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  • 2 Post By SlowZippen14
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post #1 of 9 Old 05-10-2013, 09:13 PM Thread Starter
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Acting strange

Hi guys!

I have had my 14 year old gelding for about a year now, and its been good for the most part. Today we had a rain/thunderstorm for about an hour. I don't know if my horse was frightened by all the thunder, because when I bring him in I have to turn him around to shut the gate behind me. As I turned around he didn't rear but kind of came off his front feet and had his ears pinned and had a strange look in his eye like something was wrong. Anytime in the past my horse has tried running past me while being led I just disengaged his hind quarters until he would walk at my pace, so that's what I did because it happened so fast not knowing if he was injured or not. I looked him over didn't see any cuts or could tell if he was sore anywhere. But he has been out with a mare that is in heat and she flaunts her stuff for him and it seems like he is annoyed by this because he is always trying to get away from her. So my question is do you guys think it was the thunder that startled him or the mare in heat?

Thanks
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post #2 of 9 Old 05-10-2013, 09:20 PM
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If his ears were pinned (touching his halter) he was not afraid or startled- its aggressive behavior.

Geldings can act strange when mares go into heat too even though they have no.. reproductive organs.. yeah. Could be old age-- older horses can become pretty crabby.

Did he try to attack you or the mare?
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post #3 of 9 Old 05-10-2013, 09:34 PM Thread Starter
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If his ears were pinned (touching his halter) he was not afraid or startled- its aggressive behavior.

Geldings can act strange when mares go into heat too even though they have no.. reproductive organs.. yeah. Could be old age-- older horses can become pretty crabby.

Did he try to attack you or the mare?
Well there was another gelding in the the same field as well. The mare was the first to come in. When I went back to get my horse he chased the other gelding away to be the first to come in. I hate bringing him in first because its like I'm teaching him its okay to chase the other horses away to bring him in first but they run to the other side of the field and there's only one gate to bring them in from. But as far as attack I'm not sure because I made him disengage his hind quarters so fast I wasn't going to find out if it was towards me or not.
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post #4 of 9 Old 05-10-2013, 09:41 PM
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Originally Posted by SlowZippen14 View Post
Well there was another gelding in the the same field as well. The mare was the first to come in. When I went back to get my horse he chased the other gelding away to be the first to come in. I hate bringing him in first because its like I'm teaching him its okay to chase the other horses away to bring him in first but they run to the other side of the field and there's only one gate to bring them in from. But as far as attack I'm not sure because I made him disengage his hind quarters so fast I wasn't going to find out if it was towards me or not.
don't worry you're not teaching him to chase the horses away by bringin him in first-- if he chases all the other horses away he's the alpha horse and nothing you can do could change that. Its who he is in the pecking order. Id say its more dangerous for you to bring the other horses in while he's behind them chasing them.. or even when he's in your hands-- especially with a mare that's in heat. They can be annoying to the geldings and can cause them to change their behavior. That's why most people wont pasture geldings with mares-- they can be hussies, lol.

Id bring him in first, put him away then bring in the others.




Good deal. I think you did the right thing with the disengagement of the hindend before it escalated into somethin bad. never let them get away with that kinda behavior in-hand.
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Last edited by toto; 05-10-2013 at 09:45 PM.
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post #5 of 9 Old 05-10-2013, 09:51 PM Thread Starter
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Thanks I'm a big Clinton Anderson fan. It seems he is always chasing problem horses in circles, but I would rather not always have to do this. I will try separating the mare from the geldings and see what happens. Hope this works thanks for your input!
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post #6 of 9 Old 05-10-2013, 09:59 PM
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I agree with Toto on this.

It seems that this is aggresive or emotional behavior not based in fear, but rather impatience or defensiveness or simply a minor tantrum. Your response was correct. You always do what ever it takes to get his mind back on you, and keep him out of your space., regardless of whatever "reason" he might have for being pissy. There is NO acceptable reason, so it's irrelevant.
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post #7 of 9 Old 05-10-2013, 10:15 PM Thread Starter
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I agree with Toto on this.

It seems that this is aggresive or emotional behavior not based in fear, but rather impatience or defensiveness or simply a minor tantrum. Your response was correct. You always do what ever it takes to get his mind back on you, and keep him out of your space., regardless of whatever "reason" he might have for being pissy. There is NO acceptable reason, so it's irrelevant.
Thank you. Owning a horse and having other horses at the barn can be pretty hectic at times if not frustrating when people try telling you how to raise/train your horse. It's my horse and that's that I'm going to try teaching him the way I have seen men and women teach horses for a living
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post #8 of 9 Old 05-11-2013, 09:24 AM
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If given a choice horses will opt to stay outside in a storm. A storm plays havoc with their sense of smell and hearing so they like to be able to flee a perceived predator. The barn has it's own noises which add additional stress to the horse and you want to put it in a cage where it feels trapped. He might have been trying to tell you this. I wouldn't necessarily see it as disprespect.
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post #9 of 9 Old 05-13-2013, 09:36 PM
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He was probably not feeling like this was a good idea and trying to take charge in the only way horses know how.. warning signs. Good on you for correcting him, and then checking him for any injuries.

:)
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"Strength is the ability to use a muscle without tension"
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