Basic Equipment List - Page 2
 
 

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Basic Equipment List

This is a discussion on Basic Equipment List within the New to Horses forums, part of the Keeping and Caring for Horses category

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        04-18-2014, 02:57 PM
      #11
    Foal
    Part of me wants to give you an answer like livelyblueeyes, but another part of me wants to tell you that you can generally figure a lot of this out as you go. I have been around horses for over 20 years of my life, and I still have not muscled the courage to own my own horse because of how much there is to know. With that said...people make horse ownership a lot more complicated than it really has to be (eg, supplements of every possible description, various training aids and methods, blankets of different shapes/sizes, etc.). The fact of the matter is that you can keep a horse alive and happy with NONE of the things I just listed. The main things you should make sure you have easily accessible are: a vet you trust, a farrier (your horse needs to be trimmed regularly even if he is barefoot), a safe/secure enclosure, a source of good hay, and the internet! Your head is in the right place if you are asking the www for help. Other than the essentials I mentioned (I'm sure I am missing a couple), you can find LOADS of info on the web. Also...don't believe everything you hear. There are lots of right answers, and in my experience, horse people are very opinionated on issues that that do not have black and white answers!
         
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        04-25-2014, 07:27 PM
      #12
    Foal
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by evilc123    
    Part of me wants to give you an answer like livelyblueeyes, but another part of me wants to tell you that you can generally figure a lot of this out as you go. I have been around horses for over 20 years of my life, and I still have not muscled the courage to own my own horse because of how much there is to know. With that said...people make horse ownership a lot more complicated than it really has to be (eg, supplements of every possible description, various training aids and methods, blankets of different shapes/sizes, etc.). The fact of the matter is that you can keep a horse alive and happy with NONE of the things I just listed. The main things you should make sure you have easily accessible are: a vet you trust, a farrier (your horse needs to be trimmed regularly even if he is barefoot), a safe/secure enclosure, a source of good hay, and the internet! Your head is in the right place if you are asking the www for help. Other than the essentials I mentioned (I'm sure I am missing a couple), you can find LOADS of info on the web. Also...don't believe everything you hear. There are lots of right answers, and in my experience, horse people are very opinionated on issues that that do not have black and white answers!
    This has to be one of thebest answers I have ever seen. Bravo!
         
        04-26-2014, 09:45 PM
      #13
    Foal
    So basically I would need:

    Basic grooming kit
    Halter
    Lead rope
    Vet
    Farrier
    Food
    Water
    Land
    Shelter from elements
         
        04-29-2014, 03:00 AM
      #14
    Foal
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by evilc123    
    ..don't believe everything you hear. There are lots of right answers, and in my experience, horse people are very opinionated on issues that that do not have black and white answers!
    Boy, ain't that a fact, lol!

    The other thing I've found is that price does not determine quality. I will usually look at a number of websites and at least one shop before purchasing anything of any value. But there are often good deals to be had at consignment shops, Craig's list, etc.

    Very little I can add to the good advice you've gotten, but...
    -For a lead or lunge rope, look for something that won't burn your hands unless you wear gloves.
    - I use rope halters, but I might have drank some Koolaid on that one.... but if you use them, there's a certain way to tie them. Not difficult, but necessary. If you get the regular ones and you can afford brass fittings, they won't rust out as easily.
    - Hoof picks are cheap and easily misplaced. About $2 max. Get twice as many as you think you'll need!
    - Take your time before purchase -as you already stated you would - but try out as many different horses, breeds, sizes, etc. as you can before you settle on one. There's a lot of variety. Never purchase one on the first visit (like me, lol).
    - Fly masks. Mine don't usually make it through much more than one season. The newer type of velcro attachments stay on much better.
    - You probably already know that most horses prefer company - one horse alone is usually not a good idea, depending on the horse. They are herd creatures and most need the security of others.

    Best of luck!
    livelyblueyes likes this.
         
        05-02-2014, 09:38 PM
      #15
    Foal
    Thanks for the great advice everyone, keep it coming!

    Quote:
    You probably already know that most horses prefer company - one horse alone is usually not a good idea, depending on the horse. They are herd creatures and most need the security of others by Pagencat.
    Yes I do know this and that is why my husband and I are waiting to purchase 2 horses so that we know that we can afford them.
    Pagancat likes this.
         
        05-03-2014, 09:53 AM
      #16
    Yearling
    The only thing I would add is to start a savings for items that should be fitted to the horse like saddles and bridles. You don't want to purchase something because you think it is what you want or the style you'd like to ride only to find that it doesn't fit one or both of you.
    mnevans likes this.
         
        05-03-2014, 03:13 PM
      #17
    Foal
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by mnevans    
    Thanks for the great advice everyone, keep it coming!



    Yes I do know this and that is why my husband and I are waiting to purchase 2 horses so that we know that we can afford them.
    Sorry, I missed that - good deal.

    I was thinking about this thread the other day - and excuse me if this is a repeat - but one of the biggest, and most expensive items that I consider necessary is a trailer. Or at least a neighbor or close by friend who has one available.

    It doesn't matter if you never intend to trailer your horses anywhere to ride or show, sometimes you need to either get them to help (vet, etc.) or get them out of a bad situation - heaven forbid, but disasters can happen. I do think this is one of those items that people can *really* overspend on - myself included. I'm currently trying to down-grade my 3 horse + tack close sided trailer to a stock trailer. They are much lighter and living in AZ means the openings only help with air-flow.

    And it does open up your riding options, dramatically!
    mnevans likes this.
         
        05-06-2014, 12:37 AM
      #18
    Foal
    I just started owning a horse (my first) in February. I would really recommend boarding somewhere else first. For one, you can borrow some things that you don't regularly need and wouldn't have thought to buy in the beginning, then figure out what works for you (like thrush buster, wound ointment, hoof treatments etc). Personally, the people I board with are super nice and the owner helps me clip a bridle path when I need to. I don't want to spend the money on clippers for the few times I need one.

    There are also many things that come up that you never would have thought of... I have spent countless hours reading up on horses, yet never realized some small things.

    You can also get to know your horse before you're on your own, and have some people around you to help you deal with things that come up. We got our horse from an auction, so there are quite a few behavioral things that come up and I am thankful for my barn family. :)

    Also, some horses are okay alone but not many. If you are planning on only getting one horse for the time being, I would recommend boarding and you can at least figure out if they need the company or not.

    All that said, you don't sound like the type to get in over your head and that is good. I would say the best things I did for learning about caring for horses would be volunteering at a rescue group and then taking lessons. Nothing beats being a horse owner, though! I learn something new every day. :) I would say IF you are around people that are well experienced and you trust, you can pretty much figure it out as you go as long as you have a solid base.

    As far as things to get before you get a horse:
    -Halter, lead rope, hoof pick, brushes, comb, fly spray, feed, hay, water supply, shelter, a companion, basic medical supplies

    Things to get after you have a horse:
    -grooming supplies (shampoo, stain remover, mane comb, braiding supplies... you could go on forever!), fly mask, tack (I would really wait until after so you can try some things on, figure out what fits and is comfortable), blanket for winter (later on), more specific medical supplies, boots (depending on your horse), riding apparel for you!

    Whatever you decide, you sound like you will be just fine. :)
    Pagancat, 4hoofbeat and mnevans like this.
         
        05-12-2014, 07:09 PM
      #19
    Foal
    Thanks so much everyone, Please keep posting as you think up things. As far as a trailer goes, I was talking with my husband and we will probably just save up for a 2 horse trailer and an older truck(both used but in good shape) for hauling/emergencies/fire on property or whatever else. It is way cheaper to go to the vet than have them come to you!
         
        05-12-2014, 07:17 PM
      #20
    Yearling
    Horse owning essentials:

    A sense of humor
    Humility and the ability to put your ego aside
    Low maintenance friends who won't hate you when you cancel 3 girls' nights in a row due to various equine emergencies
    A good first aid kit (for YOU and the horses alike)
    Wine, beer, or your favorite mixed drink for after the emergencies
    A phone-book full of trusted horse-people...and/or psychiatrists
    A camera to capture the good and bad moments
    Lack of embarassment for when you need to clean sheaths, messy behinds, udders and the like.
    Muscles for all the barn chores on top of riding...unless you have high school aged neighbors who will buck hay for $15 and cookies.
         

    Tags
    clothing, equipment, grooming supplies, supplies, tack

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