concrete sidewalk of doom - level achieved - The Horse Forum

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post #1 of 11 Old 09-26-2013, 11:16 AM Thread Starter
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concrete sidewalk of doom - level achieved

we have a sidewalk that leads to our driveway and we were riding the horses in our front yard

Was working with my daughter on riding and having her work with the horse or direct reining and backing up --- front yard was a nice controlled environment to work on this

We started noticing the horse veering away from the sidewalk
So we found the opportunity to work on direct reining, backing up, and crossing the concrete sidewalk of doom

Spent a lot of time walking up to it and backing away, also spent a lot of time back up to it and walking away, then we walked the length of it around the end and back down the other side

Horse would just not walk across it after 2 hours

Finally tried a different motivator --- walked her up to it --- put an alfalfa cube on the far side so she would have to step up on it to get the treat -- and she did it

So we walked her to the end and did the same thing coaxing her to walk the length of the sidewalk

Was really fun trying to figure out how to solve this problem

Was even more fun because my daughter was involved and taught her to to be persistant and solve problems with the tools she has
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post #2 of 11 Old 09-27-2013, 07:18 AM
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Haha this made me smile. I am constantly finding objects of doom to work my boys around. If they show me they don't like it or don't want to go near it, that's where we will spend all the time in the world working around that object. Now they know that if they just give up and go over/around/whatever that we can continue with our day. I think it's great for developing their "thinking" sided of the brain by making them approach the object instead of shying away :)
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post #3 of 11 Old 09-27-2013, 09:48 AM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Janasse View Post
Haha this made me smile. I am constantly finding objects of doom to work my boys around. If they show me they don't like it or don't want to go near it, that's where we will spend all the time in the world working around that object. Now they know that if they just give up and go over/around/whatever that we can continue with our day. I think it's great for developing their "thinking" sided of the brain by making them approach the object instead of shying away :)
I have heard of the soul-sucking plastic bags of doom, and their bigger cousins - the tarp, but I have not found much else

Looking forward to conquering those levels as well

Good opportunity to learn, adapt, and overcome --- and my daughter is having just as much fun as I am
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post #4 of 11 Old 09-27-2013, 09:53 AM
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Do you want to come and show my daughter how to problem solve???

My lesson kids get it just fine. Her, not so much. I've officially run out of ways to solve this problem. I am now turning it over to someone else to solve, hahaha
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post #5 of 11 Old 09-27-2013, 10:20 AM Thread Starter
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sure .. come on over -- i'll make waffles :p

Joking ... not sure if I would be the person to show anyone anything

Took a lot of creativity and persistance to make it that far --- I have what I thought was a well broke horse that was a rescue --- and turns out she is only green broke .... i've ridden horses before when I was 8 (27 years ago) -- and watched my dad break one when I was 5 (i got to be the dummy sitting on her back when she was learning to accept a rider)

A month and 10 days in and I finally feel like I am making progress

Got her off the mechanical hackmore because we haven't learned to be soft with our hands and put her on a snaffle bit with no leverage --- we are just trying to be patient and take it one step at a time --- learn something new - apply it to what we already know --- reinforce our skill sets and then learn something else new
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post #6 of 11 Old 09-27-2013, 10:41 AM
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Sounds like an excellent plan. Not getting the horse "get away" with being scared is a good habit to get into, and the way you went about it sounds like it worked well for everyone involved.

I sort of have the opposite problem. I've been around the block a few times (still see something new each time) and my daughter learned to ride on my horse who typically WAS NOT a beginner horse, he's very well trained, but likes to challenge his rider. She learned instantly how to problem solve with him.

We just got a more beginner pony for her & her Grandma to share. The pony has a lot of things that need to be worked on, but in a much shorter more manageable scale, lol (mine is a SOLID 15hh, the pony is 13.2ish). Suddenly, the Princess is helpless *head desk*. Granted she's only 10, and is quite a smart "dumb blonde", but even if the simplest thing doesn't work like she thought she flips out. Stupid stuff too. She dropped the end of the lead rope and the pony stepped on it. She pulled & pulled and the pony just stood there. I was nearby doing something else and was just watching. Finally, she got so upset, she just screamed at me to help her. When I asked why she hadn't just pushed the pony's shoulder over, I got "Oh, I didn't think of that".
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post #7 of 11 Old 09-27-2013, 11:32 AM Thread Starter
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I think the first thing we worked on with our daughter (12 years old) was managing her own attitude and temperment and letting her know that the horse would pick up on it and react accordingly

When my daughter gets mad and snippy asking why the horse isn't going -- I try to ask her questions to lead her to the right answer so that she gets into the habit of thinking about it instead of reacting to her own frustration

I wonder what how her expectations of the pony differ from her expectations of the bigger horse .....
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post #8 of 11 Old 09-27-2013, 11:49 AM
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Who knows, lol. I have a feeling I'm just in for longer "teenage" years with this one :/

I'm pretty sure A LOT of it has to do with the fact that as a mom, I know ABSOLUTELY NOTHING!!! And that she really is the smartest "dumb blonde" there is, haha. That's just who she is, always has been. My guess now that I think about it, is that with my horse she learned quickly that she had to problem solve instantly, there was no other choice. Whether it was a good solution or a not so good one, she had to make come up with something NOW.

It wasn't that she was afraid of my horse, or even that he was unsafe for her, he just challenged her. And she learned VERY fast with him, if you let him get away with anything just once he'll do it every time without fail. The had to learn very quickly to be the boss, which is completely opposite of her personality. She will ignore issues because she doesn't want to deal with them, she's very passive that way. When she was working with my horse she understood that she couldn't be that way.

With the pony, she see's less of that type of challenge. The pony is more forgiving in that she lets you make a lot of mistakes and doesn't hold it against you. She allows the Princess to be to passive again. Because the minute she's doing anything with mine, she's right back to being the boss.

We only got the pony 2 weeks ago, so I'm crossing my fingers that it gets better and she just hasn't been challenged enough yet. I'm sure that next spring when we start getting ready for show season and she has to teach her showmanship and show a 17 yr old pony that may have never been shown before that more assertive side will come back out.

Unfortunately, she had to learn to ride backwards, lol. She learned on the challenge, and THEN got the teacher.

I just have to duck tape my mouth shut until then.
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post #9 of 11 Old 09-27-2013, 12:04 PM
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OP...Me thinks your daughter is lucky to have Dad so involved here! : )
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If you ever find yourself in a fair fight, it's because your tactics suck. ~ Marine 1SGT J. Reifinger
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post #10 of 11 Old 09-27-2013, 01:26 PM Thread Starter
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thanks Dustbunny


I totally understand busysmurf --- I feel the same way with mine --- dreading those teenage years -- 1 year to go and the battle lines are already being drawn
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