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  • Can a young horse be dead broke
  • Can a 3 year old horse be dead broke

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    11-11-2013, 07:38 AM
  #11
Trained
Depends on the horse. My first horse was a yearling, incredibly sweet. Very laid back, puppy dog personality, never got a burr up his butt. He was a great first horse and I'd never re-do that.

We had a 2 year old paint we got, gelded the week before he came to us, and he was an absolutely phenomenal horse. Anyone could ride, perfect in all ways on the ground and under saddle. From the very beginning.

It all depends on the horse. Your experience. And the mentors/trainers you have. I'd never say don't do it, because there are always exceptions.
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    11-11-2013, 08:00 AM
  #12
Foal
Thanks to everyone for the comments. Please keep them coming, I'm not going to jump and buy one just yet. Going to listen first.
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    11-11-2013, 09:38 AM
  #13
Showing
As so often happens, the horse is ridden and handled in familiar surroundings. When I take someone shopping, I will have them ride the horse off property a few hundred yards, return and go out a second and third time. By now the horse may be a little ticked off thinking it's going home when it's not. But, what it shows us is the extent of it's reaction. The last horse shuffled her feet with a little backing up, then trotted off as requested. This was after the seller took the buyer for a trail ride so most horses don't want to have to go away again, especially alone. We bo't her on the spot and she worked out well.
     
    11-11-2013, 09:54 AM
  #14
Weanling
I had a 2 year old grade gelding that was practically born broke. I got him at 2, did a year of groundwork and ground driving and by the time I started him at 3 he had it all down. He never threw a buck, rarely if ever spooked and was just a joy in general to be around.

I say if you have a trainer to help you with whatever issues might crop up go ahead and buy him. I even had my 10 year old brother who at that point had almost no experience on him several times (supervised of course)

I think there are exceptions to every rule but with that being said if he is only 3 you will have to stay on guard at all times.
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    11-12-2013, 12:36 AM
  #15
Yearling
While I am inclined to agree with everyone else, I would also note that there are exceptions to the rule. Take my Arabian gelding for example. He's 19 and is spirited and spooky. He's the one that kicked me in the face this summer. But my 12 year old gelding takes care of beginners and rarely spooks. I've had him since he was 9. A lot of it depends on the disposition of the horse. Some take everything in stride and are naturally lazy, and then some are flighty and love to run. However, I would suggest visiting this horse a few more times before making a decision. Get there early because sometimes a horse can be drugged.

The most important thing I would say though is having resources to go to for horse expertise, regardless of what horse you purchase.
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    11-12-2013, 01:00 AM
  #16
Started
I'm another in the "If it's a horse then it CAN be dangerous" field. I'm sure there are definitely 3 year olds that can do anything and see anything without batting an eye. I'd recommend buying one of those after it has aged a few years. There's no reason to buy something that young, especially if you have children riding. When I see people tossing young kids on 3 year olds and younger I always cringe inside. Save the kids for the older, been there type mounts!
     
    11-12-2013, 02:58 AM
  #17
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tate1    
Can a 3 year old gelding be a good first horse? I have read where there is no such thing as a 3 year old dead broke horse. But I have seen him in person and rode him, my kids have rode him and he seems great. We have been told that it has to do with his pedigree is why he is so laid back. We got to meet another horse today from the same pedigree and he was just as laid back.
Well, I know from experience that a horse that young CAN be calm enough for children. I had one. It was nearly 50 years ago but when he was less than 3 years old, the first day I ever met him, I rode him around a fairly good sized pen with no halter/bridle/saddle/pad.... He was totally calm and always in control. And he was that way for the whole time I owned him. He could turn it on if I *asked* him to though: we did well in poles and barrels...

BUT!

I would say that horses like him who are that young are pretty rare. Plus, I'm just not sure how you would ever be able to know, up front, that you had found one. The probability of finding an extremely calm, predictable horse suitable for very inexperienced and/or young riders is much greater in an older horse. Also, there's the level of training. An older horse would probably have more experience and would be more likely to have had more training. Those are both good things when young/inexperienced riders are involved.

The 3 year old that y'all have ridden could be just fine, but the probability is lower than it would be with an older horse. When I was young I had one of each: a less-than-3-year-old who kept me nervous whenever I was riding her and another one who I could have taken a nap on.

Unfortunately there is just no way to eliminate all of the unknowns!

Radiowaves
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    11-12-2013, 03:02 AM
  #18
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by Corazon Lock    
................ However, I would suggest visiting this horse a few more times before making a decision. Get there early because sometimes a horse can be drugged.

.........
That's good advice and I particularly like the "getting there early" suggestion. As despicable as it is, some folks will drug a horse who's being looked at.

Radiowaves
     
    11-12-2013, 06:15 AM
  #19
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by Radiowaves    
That's good advice and I particularly like the "getting there early" suggestion. As despicable as it is, some folks will drug a horse who's being looked at.

Radiowaves
This lady is well known for her horses. When I tell the story and ask around, when her name comes out, all I hear is "you can trust what she says" I know about the drugging but this is just a laid back, friendly as ever horse. We went back to see him yesterday and when we went to leave he tried to follow us out the gate. (NO, he wasn't just trying to escape because he don't like it there) He is always the first to come and loves attention. I am going to buy him and with the assistance of the seller, we will all learn together.
     
    11-12-2013, 08:41 AM
  #20
Started
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tate1    
This lady is well known for her horses. When I tell the story and ask around, when her name comes out, all I hear is "you can trust what she says" I know about the drugging but this is just a laid back, friendly as ever horse. We went back to see him yesterday and when we went to leave he tried to follow us out the gate. (NO, he wasn't just trying to escape because he don't like it there) He is always the first to come and loves attention. I am going to buy him and with the assistance of the seller, we will all learn together.
Careful... I've seen this exact logic backfire on folks, often with injuries to both horse and rider! Especially with kids involved- I've rarely seen an instance when "learning together" has been a good way to go. Teaching new movements and the like, definitely. But teaching to be a calm gentleman is a bit more hairy. I would suggest that you and a trainer put quite a few miles on him before letting the kids loose on him!
     

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