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Do we need to graduate high school?

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        09-06-2013, 02:17 PM
      #51
    Started
    Home schooling can be a great way to go, and for me it was the best decision. Both my parents worked more than full time, so from grade 8-12 I schooled myself. The distance education center is in town, so a couple times a week I got to go talk to a teacher, plus they were available by phone and email. The PE section had us recording our activities and participating in various things. I was able to use my horses as one PE activity, and even do school sponsored things like running part of a marathon.

    Its also the only way I could have my horses, truck and other things. My parents had no money to spare, I was able to work evenings, weekends and two days a week, then do my schooling around my work schedule, starting when I was 15.

    Don't get me wrong, I don't think its for every one. Parents need to ensure their kids have an active social life and either the parents or the kids have to be very motivated and self disciplined.
         
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        09-06-2013, 02:21 PM
      #52
    Foal
    Well, this is my last comment on this, because I do actually own a business and work from home...something I do specifically so I can homeschool, I'm not blessed in any way. Called doing what I need to do to make things work for our family and what is important to us.

    And Speed racer, you were fairly insulting with your misspelled words and talk about how stupid it is to get a GED. So, I didn't just sit back like my face was covered and I explained that homeshoolers and GED'ers aren't stupid. Soooo, it's funny that you can say what you want and I can't. And again, spending 8 hrs a day is a bit like raising, and that's the trouble, teachers don't want to raise kids and that's what they need, raising, not just random teaching for the masses. Be thankful we don't live in burka land you can choose any thing for you and your kids. Peace.
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        09-06-2013, 02:25 PM
      #53
    Green Broke
    Before you go knocking other cultures Mama26 maybe you should try to learn about the cultures and why they do the things they do. Just because it isn't what you agree with doesn't mean it's wrong.

    Sorry to take this thread off topic.

    OP, I agree with most of everyone else. Whether it's through a high school diploma or a GED, the education that high school has to offer is priceless and will give you the boost you need to even be marketable in today's society.
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        09-06-2013, 02:27 PM
      #54
    Green Broke
    No, sorry Endiku. Mamma26kids was taking a stab at my grandparents and mothers intelligence. I thought I quoted her responses! Sorry again.

    For the record, no I don't think home schooling is a bad things and I'll admit I don't know the nitty gritty of it. I just think it should be on par with states public school, not picking and choosing what one wants to learn. It may not be my cup of tea but if it gives you the SAME education then go for it.
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        09-06-2013, 02:38 PM
      #55
    Teen Forum Moderator
    No worries SideStop! I wasn't bothered by the question even if it was directed at me. My entire life is one of answering peoples' often blunt or even downright rude statements or questions about the way my family chooses to school me. Takes a lot to ruffle my feathers about it now days xD

    Sorry, I didn't mean that we can choose what classes we learn, just how we go about learning them (through a program, on our own, etc.,). Each state's laws are different for home schoolers but in my state (Texas) we are required to have the same amount of credits and same number of credits for each core class as public schools. For me that means 22 credits to graduate, 25 to graduate on track for getting into a college, and 27 to graduate with honors I believe. I'm on the track for 27 credits due to my wish of attending a university. Certain numbers of core classes, electives, etc are required. So a home schooler in my state can't just go "Well, I want to be an engineer and I won't need English, so I'm not going to take any English classes but I'm going to go all the way through Calculus 2 in math."

    I don't necessarily think we get the SAME education as public schoolers, but it is of the same quality and is just as hard. It just may have different teaching styles, points of view, or intensity...much like the differences between remedial, honors, and AP classes.
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        09-06-2013, 06:55 PM
      #56
    Yearling
    I just have to add that in my experience some of the most educated people are the ones who got their GED's and/or homeschool. I've known several people who got their GED's and had dropped out of school to self study and ended up going onto doctoral school or working at a high end job. I've known some that haven't. It's not the type of education, or what it says on that paper, but how much you know imo. Some jobs will frown on it, but some won't; you just have to work ten times harder to obtain it or show that you are intelligent despite people's opinions.

    At least in my experience the school system is a joke. They don't teach kids how to think anymore, but how to pass a stupid test. They don't care about education, they care about who's going to pass the standardized testing. My experiences with the school system were horrible. I learned nothing from them and even though I have my high school diploma it symbolizes nothing to me other than the four years I put into my own study and research and college lectures that I would skip school to attend because I didn't fee like I was getting educated.

    I guess what I'm trying to say is that education is education, some may have biases against certain certificates but if you're educated I do believe that it will show. :)
         
        09-06-2013, 08:37 PM
      #57
    Green Broke
    I dropped out in year 11. I had hated high school for years, and had an awful time there. I thought it was overrated and could easily make my own way in the world.

    I moved out (as if my parents would want me to stay after leaving school!) and worked at coffee shops for a while, and these ones were pretty awful, high staff turnover, poor conditions. Then I was lucky enough to stumble upon a job at a small solicitors/real estate office, and they gave me a chance, and once I'd proven myself, they offered to send me through some basic business/reception training. However, at this time I could see that while they were wonderful with me, I was "the receptionist" they were "the solicitor" or "the manager" or "the agents" etc and I could never be one of them, because I did not even have the most basic level of education that is expected throughout my country. I could not even begin to apply to the types of courses they had done. Following the path I was on I could become a great admin person, but that was it pretty much. I also learned that regardless what you do, you have to work. And no matter what that work is, it will involve people you don't like.

    High School is hard, but the real world is hard too. There are teachers at high school telling you what to do, and at work there are bosses. You have obnoxious peers at high school, and at work, and at uni, and share accommodation, at horse barns - everywhere.

    I went back and did Year 11/12 in an accelerated program at a vocational type government college with other motivated drop outs and mature aged students. Then I went to university, graduated and learned so much. Now, looking for jobs as a graduate a year 12 is expected, a degree is expected. An applicant without a yr 12 would be immediately rejected. These days, everyone has one, and it is so "standard" that to get anything more than your most basic job you need one, and likely other courses you might do along the way.

    If you're not into learning how you are, look to see if you can do some sort of integrated apprenticeship or something. But don't just walk away, you'll end up likely having to make it later. Life can be hard work, you just have to suck it up, keep going. Focus on your own world, ignore the things that are horrible and you'll make it through.
    tinyliny, Endiku, plomme and 1 others like this.
         
        09-06-2013, 09:16 PM
      #58
    Started
    What the heck happened to you that made you become so distressed that you had to leave?

    I've just graduated and while my job does not require a vast majority of what I learned in school, the communication and multi-tasking skills I learned are invaluable for what I have to do in my job.
    DancingArabian likes this.
         
        09-06-2013, 11:19 PM
      #59
    Super Moderator
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Endiku    
    No worries SideStop! I wasn't bothered by the question even if it was directed at me. My entire life is one of answering peoples' often blunt or even downright rude statements or questions about the way my family chooses to school me. Takes a lot to ruffle my feathers about it now days xD

    Sorry, I didn't mean that we can choose what classes we learn, just how we go about learning them (through a program, on our own, etc.,). Each state's laws are different for home schoolers but in my state (Texas) we are required to have the same amount of credits and same number of credits for each core class as public schools. For me that means 22 credits to graduate, 25 to graduate on track for getting into a college, and 27 to graduate with honors I believe. I'm on the track for 27 credits due to my wish of attending a university. Certain numbers of core classes, electives, etc are required. So a home schooler in my state can't just go "Well, I want to be an engineer and I won't need English, so I'm not going to take any English classes but I'm going to go all the way through Calculus 2 in math."

    I don't necessarily think we get the SAME education as public schoolers, but it is of the same quality and is just as hard. It just may have different teaching styles, points of view, or intensity...much like the differences between remedial, honors, and AP classes.

    I just love this thoughtful, mature post. Obviously, you ARE learning a lot. More than the average teen, if you ask me.
    Wallaby and Endiku like this.
         
        09-06-2013, 11:37 PM
      #60
    Trained
    Stay in school and further, if you want to be able to truly afford horses, get a college degree too. Preferably a doctorate.
         

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